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message 1: by Mermarie (last edited Feb 10, 2014 05:33PM) (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod


If you'd like, please fill out the few questions below to let us know where your interests lie. Completely voluntary.


How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc:

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?:

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:

When/where do you most like to read?:

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember):

Favorite Gothic Romance couple:

Why did you decide to join this group?:


message 2: by Mermarie (last edited Feb 10, 2014 08:12PM) (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc: Mermarie or Marie

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?: Fog. Witchy lookin' trees and fear-stained heroines. :D

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:
REAL GHOSTS & Supernatural! >:D

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?: Anything by Banis(Jan Alexander), etc. :D

When/where do you most like to read?: On the sofa or in bed, during afterhours. Usually in Autumn or Winter seasons. :D

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember): Oh wow, good question--there are a few I don't recall, but the most memorable was Flowers in the Attic.

Favorite Gothic Romance couple: Thomas Eden & Me. LOL :D

Why did you decide to join this group?: Well, I figured getting a more refined "Gothic" group together would be helpful.


message 3: by Clark (new)

Clark | 1 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc: Clark

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?: Haunted Mansion

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?: something supernatural in an old run down dwelling

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?: Not a book title, but book covers come to mind. A cover with a gothic styled mansion.

When/where do you most like to read?: at night, at home, with a full pot of hot tea beside me.

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember): That was so many books ago that I can't remember. I couldn't even guess.


Favorite Gothic Romance couple: sorry....none come to mind

Why did you decide to join this group?: When I read the description of the group: "specific interests in retro pulpy Gothic novels; either historical or contemporary from the 1960s through the mid-1990s" I knew I had to join. This is my favorite type of book. I have bought hundreds of these old pulpy gothic paperbacks. I have read 20 or 30 so far. I have been buying these books for years so that when I retire then I would finally have time to enjoy them. Well, I just retired so now I'm starting to enjoy them. What attracted me to this genre was the art on the covers of these books. I just can't resist them. I have seen a blog that describes them best by this statement = Women running away from houses!


message 4: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Clark wrote: "How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc: Clark

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?: Haunted Mansion

Is there a key element which you expect ..."


Hi, Clark! It's so nice to meet you. Welcome to The Gothic Trim, as one of the forefathers. =D We're still quite brand new, but check back often as I update and invite other friends. Don't hesitate to do the same. :)


message 5: by Alyne (last edited Feb 11, 2014 11:15PM) (new)

Alyne Winter | 2 comments I'm Alyne de Winter. I love Gothic atmosphere, mystery and suspense.
The word I associate with Gothic: Fairy tale.
A Gothic tale must have the spooky mansion, creepy castle, the tormented heroine and the graveyard. Dark forests are also a must.
Psychological terror vs. visceral horror.
Movies starring Barbara Steele!
I think I began with Grimm, went to Poe and Hawthorne, Shakespeare, and into Tanith Lee, Angela Carter and Anne Rice.
I love the old films of Bela Lugosi and Val Lewton. I love all of it.
Mystify me, lead me from light into darkness,but don't leave me there!


message 6: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Hello, Alyne! Welcome to The Gothic Trim! I see you're a Gothic author, truly glad to have you onboard. I'm pretty great to see a new Gothic author with a penchant for old school classics. ;D


message 7: by Dorcas (new)

Dorcas (onemorepageplease) Hi! I'm Dorcas :)

When I think of Gothic I think atmosphere. And a menacing house /castle of some sort.

Personally, I don't like paranormal /ghosts. A good Gothic should be able to achieve thrills and chills without the age old bumps in the night. But I do love atmosphere. MM Kaye's "Death in Kenya " us a good example of this as well as Mary Stewart's "Wildfire by Midnight " set in craggy Scotland. Janet Caird's "The Shrouded Way " is also amazing.

I love tunnels, secret passageways, hidden rooms etc.

My first Gothic was a Victoria Holt but I cant remember which one. Either "Lord Of The Far Isle " or "The Shivering Sands ".

Favorite Gothic couple...no idea!


message 8: by Sita (new)

Sita | 3 comments Hi all, and thank you for the invite. I have had a hard time trying to decide if "gothic" is the right genre descriptor for some of my favorite types of novels, and recently I have been pondering just that. That said, this group may help me to figure it all out.


How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc:
Sita has worked for 34 years, so I will just stick with it I think. ;)

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?:
I have had a hard time with this. I love dark family secret type novels. Flowers in the Attic and the like, which is considered gothic; but I am not into supernatural so..

I would say, dark, mysterious, chilling..

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:
I guess dark secrets, a mystery to be unraveled, more than the usual danger (unusual dangers and psychological trauma).. Historical by at least, 50 years.. Contemporary books just don't "feel" gothic to me.

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:
Flowers in the Attic, it is the first one I ever read.

When/where do you most like to read?:
In bed.

Why did you decide to join this group?:
Hoping to find inspiration on novels with the mystery, dark secrets and danger elements I enjoy. It is hard to find since "gothic" frequently is paranormal.. and the parts of gothic I like, do not have their own separate genre that I am aware of.


message 9: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Welcome to the group, Sita & Dorcas!

@Sita, do the pulpy Gothics seem Gothic at all to you? Like the Gothics that were written in the 1960s, etc.


message 10: by Sita (new)

Sita | 3 comments Thanks Marie. To be perfectly honest with you, I don't know that I have ever read one. Outside of V.C. Andrews, I can count on one hand the books I have found which may fit the gothic genre, or at least had that dark, lurid danger and mystery of one. Which is frustration, cause I always find them spell binding when I get my hands on one. I haven't read one in years though.

I have tried to find them, but never knew what they were called. I would look for historical suspense most often as that is what I called them.

What exactly is a "pulp gothic?"


message 11: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Sita wrote: "Thanks Marie. To be perfectly honest with you, I don't know that I have ever read one. Outside of V.C. Andrews, I can count on one hand the books I have found which may fit the gothic genre, or at ..."

I generally associate a lot of pulpy gothics with contemporary setting Gothics. :D


message 12: by Sita (new)

Sita | 3 comments Ah I see. I don't read many contemporary novels. As I am fairly new to gothics, I really couldn't say if I would like them or not though. That is certainly why I joined. I am hoping to be inspired. :)


message 13: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Sita wrote: "Ah I see. I don't read many contemporary novels. As I am fairly new to gothics, I really couldn't say if I would like them or not though. That is certainly why I joined. I am hoping to be inspired. :)"

I'm kind of averse to Contemporary too, but I enjoy the paranormal/spooky factor of ghostly figures being implemented into storylines, so that generally distracts me from the contemporary drag. I've discovered I rate Gothics, too, by whether or not they've frightened me, and that's generally with real paranormal settings, etc.


message 14: by LaTonya (new)

LaTonya Reed | 1 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name etc.? Tonya

What key words do you associate with "Gothic" when applied to literature? Dark, sinister, haunted, horror.

Is there a key element you expect Gothic books to contain? Sometime of paranormal aspect and it must be dark and gritty.

Which is the first book that springs to mind when thinking of Gothic literature? "The Good, The Bad and Undead" by Kim Harrison

When/Where do you most like to read? At night, with a huge cup of hot tea, at home.

First Gothic novel read? Blue Moon (Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter #8), didn't realize it was a series at the time and read out of order, lol.

Favorite Gothic romance couple? Damali and Carlos of "Minion" (Vampire Huntress series) by L.A. Banks

Why did you decide to join this group? The description is what drew my in! Sounds like the type genres I like to read and looking forward to this group and the suggestions.


message 15: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Hey, LaTonya! Welcome to the Gothic Trim group! We've just put down the foundation and extremely new, but feel free to start up a conversation and tell us about your latest reads, etc. :D


message 16: by Paul (new)

Paul Majkut | 1 comments Call me PAUL.

I have always considered gothic literature (no, more specifically, the gothic novel)symptomatic of the grander decline of literature in the period we call "romanticism," with gothic writing an excessive example of preference for fantasy over realism, subjectivity over objectivity. These preferences seem to be historical and shift from age to age. But, when I gave a talk at the Gothic Institute Conference in San Diego a few years ago, I discovered that "Gothic" as a genre had ambitiously extended itself back in time to include works in the renaissance and middle ages. This is all complicated by considerations of "popular culture" and pulp fiction that operate on an industrial scale.

As a consequence of my rash thinking, you can imagine my unease when my novel, OULANEM, recently came out. It is the completion of a fragment left by the very young Karl Marx (19) before he became the one we all know. Very gothic--full of bombastic speeches, villains and bumblers, distressed damsels. In my hands, it is a novel of revenge, laudanum addiction, and sexual intrigue--extending Marx's intentions and style, I believe. You might take a look at it and give me some feedback.


message 17: by Jenni (new)

Jenni | 2 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc: Jenni

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?: 1st person point of view, macabre, decay.

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?: Mysterious house as a character in and of itself, weather and setting that matches the internal emotions of the heroine, past hidden secrets that come to the surface and result in either hope or greater mental instability.

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?: Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

When/where do you most like to read?: On the road, in the passenger seat.

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember): The Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt.

Favorite Gothic Romance couple: Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester.

Why did you decide to join this group?: Although many of us adore the classic gothics, I think we would like to see more of this genre written today. What might that look like? What would you want to pull from the past and combine with today to make a new kind of gothic? If you know current authors who are writing in this vein, do tell!


message 18: by Sarah Mac (new)

Sarah Mac (princess_wildflower55) | 23 comments Mod
Jenni wrote: "What would you want to pull from the past and combine with today to make a new kind of gothic? If you know current authors who are writing in this vein, do tell! "

Hi, Jenni. :) I'm not sure how pure you like the tropes, but John Harwood has written three novels & they've all got strong gothic elements. One of them is a more contemporary setting, but the other two are pseudo-Victorian. His style strikes me as a more gothic version of Wilkie Collins.

I'd definitely agree that we need more modern gothic authors. Sometimes a book will skirt the edges of the genre, but rarely is there a complete throwback. :/ I've noticed a few indie romance authors are returning to Holt-style novels, but I haven't tried any yet.


message 19: by Jenni (new)

Jenni | 2 comments Sarah, I'm interested in your comment about indie romance authors. Care to share names?

My friend Kat self published a Gothic. I have yet to read it though.Echoes in Stone


message 20: by Sarah Mac (last edited Sep 25, 2014 09:33AM) (new)

Sarah Mac (princess_wildflower55) | 23 comments Mod
The only ones I've downloaded so far are With This Curse & Sea of Secrets by Amanda DeWees...but if you go to the Amazon pages, there are several "customers also purchased" & "you might likes" to browse through. I make no promises on quality, as I've not tested the others. But the blurbs definitely show a Holt influence.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* (erinpaperbackstash) How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc: Erin is fine

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?: Old crumbling castles, running heroines, foggy woods, mystery and tension, the unknown, secretive heroes, an almost english type dry writing

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?: Yes, some mystery in it.

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?: The Dark Opals of Harrow Island

When/where do you most like to read?: I love reading in the bath. I have a standard, boring bathtub, but use a bathpillow that slips sometimes, can get lost in a book for hours in the bath. Also like reading on my new couch. Love when I can find a place outdoors to read and when it's windy/rainy outside.

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember): Flowers in the attic

Favorite Gothic Romance couple: None! Never thought about it.

Why did you decide to join this group?: I love gothic literature and also saw a friend of mine was a mod in the group, Sarah. Well, we're not personally friends, but goodreads friends and i Like her reviews and gothic enthusiasm


message 22: by Roxanne (new)

Roxanne | 1 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc: Just Roxanne :)

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?: Abandoned mansion or castle, shadows, mystery and at least a spooky legend or two of tragic love. Of the heroine overcoming scary challenges in order to be with the one she loves.

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:
- For it to be Gothic (at least to me) it has to have an element of mystery and survival. But also having a Christian theme of right vs wrong.

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:
"The Old English Baron" By Clara Reeves.

When/where do you most like to read?:
At home.
First Gothic novel read (that you can remember):
Oh golly. Northanger Abbey (a parody).

Favorite Gothic Romance couple:
Hmmm. Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester.

Why did you decide to join this group?: After I started getting back into researching 60s 70s Gothic authors. I have a couple from my childhood. I also like the classic Gothic but I am curious to discover other Gothic names.


message 23: by Renee (last edited Nov 06, 2015 07:43AM) (new)

Renee Ross (reneeross) | 3 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc:

Renee

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?:

Foreboding, Cornwall, tower, Castle, brooding, moors, cliffs….etc.

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:

A large, creepy manor with mysterious inhabitants and preferably near the sea.

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:

Since I was around 11 or 12 when I started devouring those paperbacks, I have no idea what the title would have been. It probably had the word 'shadows' in it though.

When/where do you most like to read?:

Sun porch in the morning. Bedroom at night.

Why did you decide to join this group?:

I have loved this genre for 40 years, so something tells me it's not a passing fancy. I am excited to find others who feel the same way.


message 24: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie Seiwell | 2 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc:

Bonnie

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?:

Atmosphere, suspense, mystery

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:

Orphaned heroine, old dark house, family secrets, byronic hero, secret passages, ghosts (real or otherwise), etc., Though I don't need the ghost. I also prefer historical, but it depends.

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:

Jane Eyre. At least that's the story I use to try to get people to understand what I mean when I say Gothic because most people are at least familiar with one of the movies. Everyone always tries to give me Paranormal Romance novels or talk to me about those when I say I read Gothic Romance.

When/where do you most like to read?:

Anywhere

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember):

The Last Contessa by Dorothy Fletcher 15 years ago. It was my mom's. Living in Baltimore my age group was kind of spoon fed Poe since we were in pre-k, but the first actual novel was the Last Contessa.

Favorite Gothic Romance couple:

None really.

Why did you decide to join this group?:

Because the other one is not very active. And I rarely read anything else anymore. I have about 500 Gothic novels/books. I can't possibly get enough and read them whenever I have time.


message 25: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Cowtan | 7 comments Hi everyone,

Cheryl How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc:

Thriller, horror, windy moors, crazy relatives, haunted buildings/castles, mansions What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?:

macabre situations, sketchy relationships, dominating untrustworthy hero, damsel on the run or trying to survive, weather element to create atmosphere, Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:

Anne Rice, though "We have always lived in the castle" was a crazy good Gothic read Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:

On my Kindle in the bath or on long trips while someone else is driving When/where do you most like to read?:

We have always lived in the castle First Gothic novel read (that you can remember):

oh boy ... good question.... Jane Eyre and Edward Rochester Favorite Gothic Romance couple:

I write gothic thrillers and enjoy reading them. Being part o the group is both something I'll enjoy and will help provide me insight into Gothic readers Why did you decide to join this group?:


message 26: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Cowtan | 7 comments Hi Renee,
I had read that Dark Fantasy is the genre that is replacing Gothic ... but I'm not sure that's true.
I think they'll always be some gothic novels being written, just not as many as the 60s perhaps :)


message 27: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Cowtan | 7 comments Hi Sarah,
I agree with indie publishing, authors are able to write what they want instead of being restricted by genre trends and publisher requests. We might see some more gothic coming to the fore. But I wonder how it will be changed by the passage of time.


message 28: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Welcome all! So glad to have you!!


message 29: by Mermarie (new)

Mermarie | 48 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Hi Renee,
I had read that Dark Fantasy is the genre that is replacing Gothic ... but I'm not sure that's true.
I think they'll always be some gothic novels being written, just not as many as the ..."


I'm not even sure what that genre is! lol I will have to research it.


message 30: by Sarah Mac (new)

Sarah Mac (princess_wildflower55) | 23 comments Mod
Maybe 'replacing' in terms of sales (since there's so much erotica/dark fantasy/dark romance hybrids churned out for epub), but in terms of classic Gothic formula I don't see how they could be interchangeable. It seems like a Dystopia/Post-Apoc type deal to me; some books are both, but other books are exclusive to one genre.


message 31: by Sarah Mac (new)

Sarah Mac (princess_wildflower55) | 23 comments Mod
NB: Apologies for the terrible grammar in that comment. It's 2 a.m. & my brain is tired. :)


message 32: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Cowtan | 7 comments Mermarie wrote: "Cheryl wrote: "Hi Renee,
I had read that Dark Fantasy is the genre that is replacing Gothic ... but I'm not sure that's true.
I think they'll always be some gothic novels being written, just not ..."


I know - keeping up to genre trends... Game of Thrones is considered Dark Fantasy - I believe.


message 33: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Cowtan | 7 comments Sarah Mac wrote: "Maybe 'replacing' in terms of sales (since there's so much erotica/dark fantasy/dark romance hybrids churned out for epub), but in terms of classic Gothic formula I don't see how they could be inte..."

Yes, I can see that - Post Apoc makes sense.


message 34: by Marek (new)

Marek ChoronZone (wagnerzone333) | 1 comments How you'd like to be called/by what name, etc:

Blackie

What key words do you associate with the word "Gothic" when applied to literature?:

To finely written books that can with a full awareness be names works of art where every mystery finds its place in the romantic darkness with sinister taste without any borders and still being intriguing and outstandingly interesting to me.

Is there a key element which you expect a Gothic book to contain?:

Not necessarily, I love the books to be surprising so I leave it to the works themselves without creating any internal pressure on myself and therefore I don't even remember being disappointed. I discover new books all the time as throughout my life I was reading mostly non-fiction books or philosophy and after finding out that I lost a lot I read all sinister fiction massively!

Which is the first book title that springs to your mind when thinking of Gothic literature?:

Bram Stocker works, Ann Rice, Marry Shelly, Ann Radcliffe, E. A. Poe, H. P . Lovecraft among others that I am glad to discover and happy to always quench my never-ending hunger for such works to come to and experience what they contain within..

When/where do you most like to read?:

Whenever I have a time and as long as I have it, whenever I will start to work full-time I will have less time so I us it to th maximum whenever I am, sometimes I cannot read when in train it's too loud as people lately just nearly shout through each other.

First Gothic novel read (that you can remember):

Bram Stoker's Dracula and after that some of the Ann Rice. I will never forget their influence and impressions they left for good on me as they are indeed magical works. Further readings are just a history so to say.

Favorite Gothic Romance couple:

I have none as such as I enjoy every type of goth classics and modern writings, so beside books - M & M Wayans from NBK movie for sure as I love a spice of the madness present in this movie, I love though Count Dracula and Mina.

Why did you decide to join this group?:

I join groups that are sharing the same interests that I have and I didn't even needed to study description or rules for long as it is natural to me to always behave in the way that is necessary and can be termed as fine.

Best Greetings!


message 35: by Taffeta (new)

Taffeta | 1 comments You can call me Taff...

Gothic romances should feature:
* A woman in a diaphanous gown on the cover, peering over
her shoulder at a creepy mansion with a single lit window...
*A ridiculously contrived plot twist
*Muted sexual tension

My first gothic romance was The Jaubert Ring, by Willo Davis Roberts...I lost track of my copy many years ago...(sniffle)

I joined this group because I would love to chat with like-minded souls about this groovy genre! Thanks for having me!


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