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ARCHIVE > RADIAH'S 50 BOOKS IN 2014

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message 1: by Radiah (last edited Apr 16, 2014 01:49AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments JANUARY

1. My Heroes Extraordinary Courage, Exceptional People by Ranulph Fiennes by Ranulph Fiennes Ranulph Fiennes

Date finished: January 24, 2014
Genre: Non Fiction
Rating: B
Review: I had mixed feelings about this book, however, this is, in a way, a personal compilation of heroes that have inspired Sir Fiennes. It's an enjoyable read though sad at times.


message 2: by Radiah (last edited Feb 06, 2014 09:32PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 2. They Fight Like Soldiers, They Die Like Children The Global Quest to Eradicate the Use of Child Soldiers by Roméo Dallaire by Roméo Dallaire Roméo Dallaire

Date finished: January 28, 2014
Genre: Non Fiction / War
Rating: A
Review: It is heartbreaking and at times difficult for me to read, the accounts are relentless in pushing the point that child soldiers should never be used in war, however, faced with the fact that they are a cheap inexhaustible supply of weaponry that can be taught, molded and manipulated, they are the best recruits in any armed conflict. The writer is committed to ending this cycle and it is certainly worth a read.


message 3: by Radiah (last edited Apr 17, 2014 10:48PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments FEBRUARY

3. The Shock Doctrine The Rise of Disaster Capitalism by Naomi Klein by Naomi Klein Naomi Klein

Date finished: February 1, 2014
Genre: Non Fiction / Politics / Economics
Rating: A
Review: A disturbing read highlighting the motivations behind some of the biggest political and economic upheavals in the 20th century. From CIA-sponsored coups in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America to the Tianenmen Square massacres and the "solutions" to the Asian financial crisis, the book is well-researched and ties in events I did not expect were linked.


message 4: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Great start, Radiah. But remember to put an author's link. For example:

The Shock Doctrine The Rise of Disaster Capitalism by Naomi Klein by Naomi Klein Naomi Klein


message 5: by Radiah (last edited Feb 06, 2014 11:10PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 4. Scurvy How a Surgeon, a Mariner, and a Gentlemen Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail by Stephen R. Bown by Stephen R. Bown Stephen R. Bown

Date finished: February 3, 2014
Genre: Non Fiction / History
Rating: C
Review: An interesting read, if slightly boring. What I found most interesting was how the cure for scurvy was found and lost many times even though it was the cause of 75% of the deaths out at sea; neither combat nor shipwrecks accounted for the number of deaths scurvy took. Through reading it, I wondered why more attention wasn't paid to solving the problem.


message 6: by Radiah (last edited Feb 06, 2014 09:33PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 5. The Forgotten Highlander My Incredible Story Of Survival During The War In The Far East by Alistair Urquhart by Alistair Urquhart Alistair Urquhart

Date finished: February 6, 2014
Genre: Non Fiction / History / Military
Rating: A
Review: Being from Singapore, this account of a Scottish infantryman who became a POW when the British surrendered us to the Japanese hit close to home. He was sent to work on the Death Railway, a horrendous episode in South East Asia. Having survived that, he then survived the infamous hellships. Brought to Nagasaki, he was nearby when the atomic bomb was dropped on the city. Amazingly, he survived all that to be brought home to Scotland, where subsequently he was treated appallingly. This is one of the best books I have ever read about WW2.


message 7: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 6. The Good Soldiers by David Finkel by David Finkel David Finkel

Date finished: February 7, 2014
Genre: Non Fiction / Military
Rating: A
Review: Well-written account delving into the experiences of Battalion 2-16 in Baghdad during the Iraq war. Consisting of men at an average age of 19, the writer conveyed the dreams and the nightmares these optimistic young infantry soldiers faced as they were stationed in a particularly vicious area of Baghdad. I teared reading about how some attempted to take their own lives after being maimed while on patrol, and how some faced such terrible PTSD on duty they were seriously contemplating suicide even knowing their families were waiting for them to return. For whatever reasons wars are fought, this book tells a universal tale of the price of war.


message 8: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great, Radiah, you have the citations figured out, very good. Great titles, I look forward to reading your posts here.


message 9: by Kressel (new)

Kressel Housman | 917 comments Bryan wrote: "Great titles, I look forward to reading your posts here."

Agreed! Looks like substantive stuff!


message 10: by Radiah (last edited Feb 11, 2014 11:31PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 7. The Long Walk The True Story of a Trek to Freedom by Slavomir Rawicz by Slavomir Rawicz Slavomir Rawicz

Date finished: 10 February 2014
Genre: History / Adventure / Non Fiction
Rating: B
Review: Some controversy exists about the authenticity of the story. Regardless, it is riveting. Walking from a Gulag camp in Siberia to British India, they encountered many dangers and had two of their number perish in the Gobi desert. Upon reaching Tibet, it was heartening to read about the hospitality of the Tibetans towards total strangers. There were moments where I wondered about the story, but I still enjoyed it.


message 11: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 8. Koba the Dread Laughter and the Twenty Million by Martin Amis by Martin Amis Martin Amis

Date finished: 12 February 2014
Genre: History / Politics
Rating: B
Review: A haunting read, but honestly, it was difficult for me to finish. I guess I prefer a straightforward listing of what Stalin did that affected the 20 million and I could do without the weaving in of personal touches. The writer meticulously researched the information in the book and I was very much interested in the factual parts of the book.


message 12: by Radiah (last edited Feb 16, 2014 06:25PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 9. Hunting the Tiger The Fast Life and Violent Death of the Balkans' Most Dangerous Man by Christopher S. Stewart by Christopher S. Stewart Christopher S. Stewart

Date finished: 14 February 2014
Genre: History
Rating: B+
Review: The writer was subtly threatened and told off, and still persisted in compiling information on Arkan Raznatovic, a Serbian paramilitary commander who was well known to be wanted by the UN for crimes against humanity during the tragic Yugoslav wars. He did a commendable job and tried to sift through fact from fiction. In the end, I wasn't too sure if he managed to obtain actual facts about Arkan's life. However, he did manage to paint a vivid portrait of the hero or the monster, depending on which side of the fence you were on.


message 13: by Radiah (last edited Feb 16, 2014 11:05PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 10. Bridge of Spies by Giles Whittell by Giles Whittell (photo not available)

Date finished: 17 February 2014
Genre: History
Rating: B
Review: A look into a prisoner exchange between the US and the Soviet Union in East-West Germany on Feb 10, 1962. The writer traces the lives and missions of each of the prisoners, how they were captured and their roles in the Cold War. I'm starting to learn more about the cold war right now, and this book was a good start. It is packed with information about weapons, spying techniques and hidden decisions which shaped the direction of the cold war.


message 14: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 11. Soldiers of Fortune A History of the Mercenary in Modern Warfare by Tony Geraghty by Tony Geraghty Tony Geraghty

Date finished: 21 February 2014
Genre: History / Military History
Rating: A
Review: Mr. Geraghty presents the motivations behind the PMC’s involvements in conflicts [profit, of course], their growing roles in conflicts, and presents his research in a straightforward writing style which I found engaging. He traces the history of mercenary agents in conflicts in the Congo and Angola, to Oman, Yemen, the ugly war in the former Yugoslavia up to Iraq and Afghanistan and subsequently, raises questions on the seemingly indiscriminate policies governing the use of private contractors and lack of accountability governing them.


message 15: by Radiah (last edited Feb 27, 2014 07:14AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 12. The New Cold War How The Kremlin Menaces Both Russia And The West by Edward Lucas by Edward Lucas(photo unavailable)

Date finished: 27 February 2014
Genre: Politics
Rating: B
Review: I feel the author's anguish at losing a friend and the oppression of journalists critical of the government of a country. I live in a similar environment, and yes, it is difficult when the press is not allowed to be critical or voice their opinions without the fear of repercussions. His criticisms of Russia's economic policies were one I could do without. Call me an optimist, or perhaps naive, but after the disaster of the Yeltsin years, I believe they are still trying to find their economic footing. Perhaps a more immediate concern would be that the Western concept of liberalism isn't embraced enthusiastically in that part of the world. Regardless of my opinions, this book raises some questions that seem alarming when put together.


message 16: by Radiah (last edited Apr 16, 2014 01:00AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments MARCH

13. Jungle Soldier The True Story of Freddy Spencer Chapman by Brian Moynahan by Brian Moynahan (photo unavailable)

Date finished: 4 March 2014
Genre: Military History / Biography
Rating: B+
Review: I had been searching for months for this book and I was not disappointed. Freddy Chapman, was stranded behind enemy lines when Singapore was surrendered to the Japanese in May 1944. It was a terrible time for Singaporeans, as my grandfather used to say (he still refuses to talk about the war), and the courage it took Chapman to commit himself to guerilla warfare against the Japanese whilst battling malaria, deep leg ulcers, typhus, pneumonia and a whole plethora of other tropical diseases was astounding. That he survived was one thing; that he thrived in the jungle terrain (something many foreign soldiers couldn't handle) was nothing short of awe-inspiring. What an amazing life this man led.


message 17: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 14. No Logo No Space, No Choice, No Jobs by Naomi Klein by Naomi Klein Naomi Klein

Date finished: 23 March 2014
Genre: Non Fiction
Rating: A
Review: As usual after reading Naomi Klein, I had to examine myself, my habits and how I am contributing to the oppression of the masses. This book is classic Klein (I read the 10th anniversary edition, with a great Afterword). Her research is, as usual, meticulous, examining corporations who make obscenely massive profits off the backs of children and women earning $2 a day. Required reading for anyone who has ever examined a tag on the back of their shirts and wondered who makes their clothes.


message 18: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 15. Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare William Shakespeare

Date finished: 24 March 2014
Genre: Fiction
Rating: B
Review: Needed a break from the serious stuff, and decided to re-read a comedy. Twelfth Night is enjoyable with the mistaken identities and characters with such melodramatics. However, it is much better experienced in a play than read.


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 02, 2014 05:27PM) (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Radish great job thus far. The format posted in message one was incorrect - not your fault. Please change Date finished in your entries to Finish date:

This is the actual format: (unfortunate that the format added in your case was not the standard) - not your fault and easy to fix.

Our Required Format:

JANUARY

1. My Early Life, 1874-1904 by Winston Churchill by Winston Churchill Winston S. Churchill
Finish date: March 2008
Genre: (whatever genre the book happens to be)
Rating: A
Review: You can add text from a review you have written but no links to any review elsewhere even goodreads. And that is about it. Just make sure to number consecutively and just add the months.


message 20: by Radiah (last edited Apr 17, 2014 03:11AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments APRIL

16. Gulag by Anne Applebaum by Anne Applebaum Anne Applebaum
Finish date: April 2014
Genre: History
Rating: A
Review: Anne Applebaum's efforts in trying to lay out the history of Russia's forgotten holocaust is incredible . She's woven together stories from victims, accounts recorded in archives and testimonies from families of the victims. Parts of it made me cringe. It is a worthy tribute to their memory.


message 21: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Sounds like a book for the TBR list, Radiah. Thanks for the tip.


message 22: by Radiah (last edited Apr 20, 2014 07:06PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 17. Othello by William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare William Shakespeare
Finish date: April 2014
Genre: Classic
Rating: B
Review: I've seen Othello performed, and reading it was just as dramatic. Not one of my favourite plays, however. I wonder if Tolkien took inspiration from Iago to write Wormtongue's character.


message 23: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 18. Two Soldiers, Two Lost Fronts German War Diaries of the Stalingrad and North Africa Campaigns by Don A. Gregory by Don A. Gregory (no photo avlb)
Finish date: April 2014
Genre: Military History, WWII
Rating: B
Review: Besides trying to make sense of the German military lingo, it was easy to read through. The book is a compilation of two diaries from two Nazi soldiers - one fighting in Stalingrad, another in North Africa. The sense of desperation I felt at times immediately connected me with them. It served as a reminder to me that the soldiers fighting at the war front at times just wanted to survive to see the next day.


message 24: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 19. Red Harvest (Star Wars) by Joe Schreiber byJoe Schreiber(no photo avlb)
Finish date: April 2014
Genre: Sci-Fi
Rating: B+
Review: Pretty well written piece of Star Wars expanded universe, with a look into Sith Academy life.


message 25: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 20. Tales from Nowhere by Don George byDon George(no photo avlb)
Finish date: April 2014
Genre: Travel
Rating: A
Review: The book is a collection of stories from travel writers and journalists who have found themselves at times travelling either willingly or unwillingly to remote locales, trying to connect with the locals and somehow finding more than they expected. The idea of getting lost in the middle of nowhere, in a place that is strange, among people who don't speak your language (or languages)... I wish I could do that again.


message 26: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 21. Children of Atlantis by Z. Lesi&cacute byZ. Lesi&cacute(no photo avlb)
Finish date: April 2014
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: A
Review: This book is a compilation of essays from survivors of the war who had managed to escape and were now living scattered all over the world. I had read much about the war in the news media, but reading the personal thoughts of the Children of Yugoslavia opened my eyes to the reality of what they faced.There was a sense of guilt from the writers from having to run when they felt they probably should have stayed to fight... but fight who? Friends or family members who were suddenly the enemy?

Most inspiring of all was the optimism which came through in their writing; perhaps a telling trait shared by all Yugoslavians whether Croat, Serb, Bosnian or Albanian. Almost all of them wrote that they would be returning home, or to what's left of it to contribute to rebuilding. I hope the Children of Yugoslavia who had been forced to flee a senseless war have found their way home again.


message 27: by Radiah (last edited Apr 26, 2014 05:34AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 22. Afghanistan Soviet Vietnam by Vladislav Tamarov byVladislav Tamarov(no photo avlb)
Finish Date: April 2014
Genre: Military History
Rating: A
Review: The writer, Vladislav Tamarov kept a secret journal and photographic record when he was drafted at the age of 19 into the Soviet Army to fight in Afghanistan. The photographs in his collection are incredible, and his writing is honest and a little poetic. He tells of his personal experiences caught in fire fights, shows pictures of the locals and his comrades; most of whom seemed to have died or been seriously injured and the harsh environment he was fighting in. He conveys his fear, his desperation, his anger and hopelessness at fighting what he saw as a futile war; a voice of the Soviet youth. I truly felt for his struggle and all that he had endured and all that he had to do in the name of war.


message 28: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great review, thank you, Radiah.


message 29: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 29, 2014 08:18AM) (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Radiah I echo what Bryan stated. Just one minor thing to make your citations easier - just add (no photo) at the end when there is no author's photo available - you don't have to add the avlb.


message 30: by Radiah (last edited May 22, 2014 05:49AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments MAY

23. A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare William Shakespeare
Finish Date: May 2014
Genre: Classic
Rating: B
Review: Puck reminded me of one of those meddlesome aunts who sometimes just want to watch the world burn. This classic is pretty humorous, but I didn't quite enjoy it as much as Twelfth Night. Was it just me, or did anyone else want to trap the fairies in a glass cup and throw it into the sea?


message 31: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Good, Radiah, just flip the photo and link around for Mr. Shakespeare.


message 32: by Radiah (last edited May 22, 2014 06:01AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 24. The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer by Guy Sajer(no photo)
Finish Date: May 2014
Genre: Military History
Rating: A
Review: This is an absolutely amazing reading experience. To read it, see Guy Sajer's hopes and dreams being slowly eroded during his time in the war was devestating. From a young man full of idealism, he progressed into a man whose spirit was decimated by the ugliness of what he experienced. I found myself evaluating what I as a civilian read in the news about the various wars occuring now and the men and women fighting them. I'm sure my review could never do this biographic account justice and all I can say is that I don't think I would ever read about another battle again with the same attitude.


message 33: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 25. The Coming Anarchy Shattering the Dreams of the Post Cold War by Robert D. Kaplan by Robert D. Kaplan Robert D. Kaplan
Finish Date: May 2014
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: B
Review: Mr Kaplan has much to say of the coming anarchy, and some of his predictions have come true. This article was published in 1994, I can't make up my mind about whether Mr. Kaplan is a pessimist of the worst kind, or simply doing his human duty in warning us that the social fabric we have woven is coming apart at the seams. I happen to agree with his statement on democracy, namely that democracy cannot be imposed on a society that is not ready for it.


message 34: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 26. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer by Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer
Finish Date: May 2014
Genre: Classic
Rating: B
Review: Simply thought of taking a break from the serious stuff and re-reading a few of the classic stories from the Canterbury Tales. Always enjoyable, especially that Wyf of Bathe!


message 35: by Radiah (last edited Jul 01, 2014 04:51AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 27. Eastward to Tartary Travels in the Balkans, the Middle East, and the Caucasus by Robert D. Kaplan by Robert D. Kaplan Robert D. Kaplan
Finish Date: May 2014
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: B+
Review: This book is overwhelming. Writing for a mostly American audience, Robert Kaplan being the gifted writer that he is, had me right beside him as he interviews scholars, political figures and regular locals as he traveled through Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel and then continuing through Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan. He outlines the important historical events and the influence they have had on the modern day struggles of this region. I don’t agree with all of his opinions, but he does make some very interesting and logical predictions which have actually come true (the book was published in 2000). We live in a reality of our own making after all, and Kaplan’s writing in this book is engaging as it pulls you in and doesn't really let go. I've always been fascinated by this region of the world, and I would say Kaplan does do the retelling of its history justice.


message 36: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Good progress Radiah - you have 53 views that means that 53 different and unique people are reading your thread.


message 37: by Radiah (last edited Jul 01, 2014 04:51AM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments JUNE
28. Putin's Progress A Biography Of Russia's Enigmatic President, Vladimir Putin by Peter Truscott by Peter Truscott(no photo)
Finish date: June 2014
Genre: Non-Fiction
Rating: B
Review: Decided to pick this up following the commotion in the Ukraine recently. I've been reading about Mr. Putin in snatches and I decided to pick this one up after a recommendation from a friend. The writer traces Mr. Putin's history from his grandfather's life to his birth and poor upbringing, which I thought partly explains why he's such a stoic character. The writer then goes on to trace his rise through the KGB, his seemingly incidental political career and his dealings with the top issues in Russia since he took office; including Chechnya, the Kursk submarine, the Moscow Theater incident, the Iraq War, dealing with the Russian Oligarchs and his relationship with the West.


message 38: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 29. Forgotten Wars Freedom and Revolution in Southeast Asia by C.A. Bayly by C.A. Bayly(no photo)
Finish date: June 2014
Genre: History
Rating: B+
Review: A well-written account of how the British lost their Asian colonies after the Japanese retreated. Personally, as a Singaporean, I had learnt in school about the sense of dissatisfaction and betrayal we had had against the British for surrendering us to the Japanese and that had caused a tidal wave of resistance movements towards the Crown and subsequently, a resolve to never be beholden to another Colonial Master. This book traces the events and furher elaborates the little known decisions which led to the road to independence. What was most interesting was the pivotal role which Communism played in this region and how more than any other ideology, it created the means to be free of the Crown. The book tells some hard truths; some difficult to read. Reading this made me appreciate the difficulties our forefathers had.


message 39: by Kressel (new)

Kressel Housman | 917 comments In light of our group read of The Raj Quartet, this looks very interesting.

The Raj Quartet by Paul Scott by Paul Scott Paul Scott


message 40: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments It certainly is related. The book does outline the events occuring within India and the overthrow of the British with the support of the Indians living in Malaysia and Singapore. :)


message 41: by Jill (last edited Jul 31, 2014 07:43PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Thanks for posting that book, Radiah......I am going to add to our Raj Quartet bibliography.

The Raj Quartet by Paul Scott by Paul Scott Paul Scott


message 42: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments JULY

30. March Or Die France And The Foreign Legion by Tony Geraghty by Tony Geraghty Tony Geraghty
Finished: July 2014
Genre: History, Military History
Rating: A
Review: The French Foreign Legion has often been portrayed with romance and a dash of fantasy. Tony Geraghty tells the story of the legion, tracing their formation and outlining the character of a legionnaire. From the outset, the legion is shown to have been made up of mostly foreigners, including bands of native warriors from the French colonies. The Legion, as Mr. Geraghty shows, has often had a relationship with the French government that is similar to an evil stepmother with an unwanted stepchild.
The book describes in good detail the events of the major battles which the Legionnaires have been involved in. Starting with Waterloo through to World War I and II, the French involvement in Indo-China and onto the struggle and mutiny of Algeria and the Legion in modern times, each battle saw the loss of scores of legionnaires, either through desertion or death. I was particularly astonished by the Legion’s feat in Camerone and most especially in Indo-China. As with Camerone, Dien Bien Phu was a ferocious battle, with so many lives lost and men made and broken. Mr Geraghty introduces us to the remarkable men (and one woman) of the Legion; men such as Colonel Pierre Jeanpierre, Captain Jean Danjou and many others whose names have gone down in Legion accounts as larger than life figures.
All in all, this is a well-researched introduction to the Foreign Legion and how French politics have shaped and influenced their existence.


message 43: by Radiah (last edited Jul 19, 2014 11:09PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 31. Black Ops The Rise of Special Forces in the CIA, the SAS, and Mossad by Tony Geraghty by Tony Geraghty Tony Geraghty
Finished: July 2014
Genre: Military History
Rating: C
Review: The timelines threw me off, I couldn't quite get a good flow reading this book. There were some interesting insights but it wasn't something I haven't read before, and the book is heavily skewed towards the SAS (I guess because the author did write Who Dares Wins in the 70s and shows a familiarity with the SAS). He touched on the CIA's activities and a little bit on Mossad. It's mostly a case-by-case study of the increasing use of Special Forces in various conflicts around the world. I was more interested in the Appendices where Mr Geraghty has included The MacChrystal Report on Afghanistan, the drug war in Afghanistan and the battle of Tora Bora.


message 44: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Radiah wrote: "JULY

30. March Or Die France And The Foreign Legion by Tony Geraghtyby Tony GeraghtyTony Geraghty
Finished: July 2014
Genre: History, Military History
Rati..."


This looks like a fascinating book, Radiah. I am putting it on my tbr list. Thanks.


message 45: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments It certainly is! I'm now looking for a good second-hand copy to purchase.


message 46: by Radiah (last edited Jul 25, 2014 10:25PM) (new)

Radiah | 375 comments 32. July 1914 Countdown to War by Sean McMeekin by Sean McMeekin(no photo)
Finished: July 2014
Genre: History
Rating: B+
Review: I had shivers down my spine reading this minute by minute account of the events leading up to World War I. At the back of my mind, I kept asking "WHY?!" while reading about the manipulations of each party and how each minute seemed to bring about the inevitable conclusion of a war in which 37 million soldiers and civilians would ultimately sacrifice their lives for. We all know history is written by the victors, but Mr. McMeekin shows the added complexities of the events and decisions which led up to WWI which made me contemplate whether its really all that simple. You could say my mind was blown away.

In honour of the fallen.... Lest we forget.


message 47: by Jill (last edited Jul 31, 2014 07:42PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Wasn't that a great book, Radiah!!! I read it a couple of month ago and was fascinated. The reasons for WWI seem ludicrous and the diplomats who were working feverishly in the background were totally out of their league. Would that it were "the war to end all wars"......but unfortunately even that turned out to be false.


message 48: by Radiah (new)

Radiah | 375 comments Jill wrote: "Wasn't that a great book, Radiah!!! I read it a couple of month ago and was fascinated. The reasons for WWI seem ludicrous and the diplomats who were working feverishly in the background were tota..."

Yes, absolutely! I still can't get over how so many people had to die after reading the sequence of events laid out in the book. You used the perfect word to describe it all: ludicrous.


message 49: by Kressel (new)

Kressel Housman | 917 comments Radiah wrote: "July 1914 Countdown to War by Sean McMeekin by Sean McMeekin(no photo)

I had shivers down my spine reading this minute account of the events leading up to World War I."


I just attempted The Guns of August by Barbara W. Tuchman and couldn't get through it. Perhaps this one is the book I was looking for.

The Guns of August by Barbara W. Tuchman by Barbara W. Tuchman Barbara W. Tuchman


message 50: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I think you will like it, Kressel.


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