Once Upon A Fairy Tale discussion

124 views
Most "Underrated" Fairytale?

Comments Showing 1-17 of 17 (17 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Michael (new)

Michael Mullin (michaelmullin) What is the fairytale you're most surprised hasn't risen to the "Cinderella" level? I'll start with a favorite of mine: Godfather Death. In a sparse way (typical of fairytales) Death is given surprising depth of characterization. Let's face it: there are plenty of ways to do that character wrong or cliché. The Grim Reaper. Yawn. And the hero/protagonist isn't just given "gold" or "wealth" or a "magic sword" - he's given the means to be a brilliant doctor. And the cave & candles bit? Nice!


message 2: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments I enjoyed The Selfish Giant by Oscar Wilde. Also Bluebeard sort of died recently, because we're limiting fairy tales to children more and it's messed up.


Bonnie (A Backwards Story) (abackwardsstory) | 7 comments I think Bluebeard is still pretty popular. I can think of two novels that came out within the last couple of years with a Bluebeard theme, both YA!

I think novels also made a formerly obscure fairy tale I love, East of the Sun, West of the Moon, popular again, and of course, The Snow Queen is popular now, but was my favorite obscure title before "now." I also really like The Light Princess, Allerleirauh (All-kinds-of-fur), and The Tinderbox...I can't choose one, haha.


message 4: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments I didn't even know about Bluebeard until a children's lit class this year... What are the YA novels?

I love East of the Sun, West of the Moon! And Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow (Jessica Day George); Ice (Sarah Beth Durst); and East (Judith Pattou). I liked all the different twists of it.

I think Frozen definitely popularized The Snow Queen... Although after watching it I read the Hans Christian Anderson story online and it didn't seem that similar; maybe I got the wrong one?


message 5: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments Sorry, Edith Pattou. Autocorrect.


message 6: by Mary (new)

Mary Reagan | 1 comments I also love East of the Sun, West of the Moon! Another one I love is the Goose Girl.


message 7: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments Yes! Have you read the Shannon Hale version?


message 8: by Danielle (last edited Apr 16, 2014 07:36AM) (new)

Danielle | 48 comments I too wish that East of the Sun and West of the Moon and The Snow Queen were more popular. It is cool that there are adaptations that help bring them to new readers, but they've hardly reached the cultural significance that tales like Cinderella or Beauty and the Beast have.

Ellie wrote: I think Frozen definitely popularized The Snow Queen... Although after watching it I read the Hans Christian Anderson story online and it didn't seem that similar; maybe I got the wrong one?

Frozen was only inspired by The Snow Queen, so you were probably reading the right one.

All the East of the Sun and West of the Moon adaptations you listed are my favorites and part of the reason I love the fairy tale so much. :)


message 9: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments Danielle wrote: "I too wish that East of the Sun and West of the Moon and The Snow Queen were more popular. It is cool that there are adaptations that help bring them to new readers, but they've hardly reached the ..."


In the children's lit class I took this year, they actually categorized East of the Sun and West of the Moon as a Beauty and the Beast tale type. I can see some parallels (the whole maiden/bear thing) but the troll kingdom doesn't really come into play in Beauty and the Beast.

Because of the trolls, princesses, and Scandinavian themes, part of me hopes the Frozen sequel follows the plot of East of the Sun, West of the Moon.


message 10: by Danielle (new)

Danielle | 48 comments Ellie wrote: "Danielle wrote: "I too wish that East of the Sun and West of the Moon and The Snow Queen were more popular. It is cool that there are adaptations that help bring them to new readers, but they've ha..."

I definitely see how it relates to Beauty and the Beast, but East of the Sun and West of the Moon has always appealed to me more because in my opinion, there is a greater struggle to save or reclaim the prince. Although I do love Beauty and the Beast too.

Because of the trolls, princesses, and Scandinavian themes, part of me hopes the Frozen sequel follows the plot of East of the Sun, West of the Moon.

Is there really going to be a sequel to Frozen? I feel a little uncertain about how a sequel would turn out, but if that does happen I think that would be so awesome if they followed East of the Sun and West of the Moon for the main plot.


message 11: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments I agree - the princess is a much stronger, more active protagonist in East of the Sun, West of the Moon than in Beauty and the Beast. And the whole North Wind is cool; it's been one of my favorite parts to see across the adaptations.

It's hard for a sequel to live up to the first movie, especially with a hit like Frozen. I'm kind of scared Elsa will get a love interest "just because".

Beauty and the Beast has always been one of my favorite well-known fairy tales. Madame de Beaumont wrote it well.
Although it's interesting how the stories changed for proper court life - the original peasant work stories were much more edgy.


message 12: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments Yes! But the Happy Prince makes me want to cry. Admittedly, that's probably part of why I love it.
And I have no idea why Tom Thumb isn't more well known. It was in my big fairy tale book as a kid, but no one talked about it in pop culture, and it was a good story.


message 13: by Danielle (last edited Apr 18, 2014 12:44PM) (new)

Danielle | 48 comments Ellie wrote: "Yes! But the Happy Prince makes me want to cry. Admittedly, that's probably part of why I love it.
And I have no idea why Tom Thumb isn't more well known. It was in my big fairy tale book as a kid..."


I haven't heard of the Happy Prince, I'll have to look it up.
I think Disney once made a short film about Tom Thumb. I know for certain they've made a version of the Gallant Tailor called "Mickey and the Giant", so maybe I'm thinking of that instead.

So I looked up Madame de Beaumont, and I had no clue the popular version of Beauty and the Beast is based on a longer version.
Edit:While looking up Madame de Beaumont I came across this article about Beauty and the Beast that I thought was pretty interesting and it has a list of different adaptations of the tale at the end.
http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/f...


message 14: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Wig (elizabethwig) | 8 comments That's so interesting! We only read a few of those stories in class (including Angela Carter's "Tiger's Bride". I didn't even know about some of those adaptations - will have to check them out!

It's interesting that Robin McKinley wrote two adaptations of the same story at different points in her life, too.


message 15: by Lacey (new)

Lacey Louwagie Ellie wrote: "I agree - the princess is a much stronger, more active protagonist in East of the Sun, West of the Moon than in Beauty and the Beast. And the whole North Wind is cool; it's been one of my favorite ..."

I'm also nervous about a Frozen sequel and Elsa ending up with the obligatory love interest. One thing I've considered is that "Frozen," which bears so little resemblance to "The Snow Queen" could actually be something of an "origin" story. If I remember correctly, the HCA version doesn't explore how the Snow Queen became that way, but Frozen does. If Disney does go forward with a sequel, it would be interesting to see them delve more deeply into themes from the original, which were mostly abandoned in this *very* loose interpretation (which, by the way, I still adore!)


message 16: by Cassie (new)

Cassie Helwig | 1 comments Which version is best for East of the Sun, West of the Moon? I searched for it and there are about a million authors haha.


message 17: by Zippymae (new)

Zippymae | 2 comments I always found Fair Rosalinda wonderfully creepy.


back to top