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The Teleportation Accident
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2014 Book Discussions > The Teleportation Accident - Part 3 (February 2014)

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Casceil | 1692 comments Mod
This thread is for discussion of Part Three.


message 2: by Peter (last edited Feb 02, 2014 02:11PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Peter Aronson (peteraronson) | 516 comments You know, I don't think Beauman likes Southern California very much...


LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 2305 comments I don't think it's Southern California - its LA. I know he's Dutch and if he's comparing LA to Amsterdam, and likes Amsterdam, than LA has to look like a disaster. My personal opinion of LA (but not Southern California) is that it is urban sprawl at its worse. I've spent some time there for work and been laughed at when I asked directions on how to walk someplace that was no more than a mile away. What other city of that size has such poor public transit? Give my NYC (or Amsterdam) any day!


Terry Pearce Page 267 (paperback):

'"gravitational force" and "electric charge" and "Planck's constant" and even "causation" are just the same as Dagon and Tezcatlipoca and Yahweh and Ryujin -- patterns that men think they've seen, when the real pattern is far, far too complex for them to see, like a child with a crayon finding funny shapes in a logarithmic table.'

This. This this this. This is an idea I've heard and played around with in one way or another, but never heard put so well.


Terry Pearce I can see why some people liked Part Three the most, as we start to move away from Loeser as the focus and threads start to pull together. The scenes with Bailey going back and forth in his perception of time were very well done.


Daniel Yes, that quote in message 4 is stellar. It impressed me very much as well.

As for enjoyment ramping up in Part Three, the opposite was the case for me. Part Three was where my interest began to unravel. Judging from the comments so far, it looks like I might be alone in that opinion...


message 7: by Peter (last edited Feb 26, 2014 10:02AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Peter Aronson (peteraronson) | 516 comments The quote is also very Howard Philips Lovecraft (which is unsurprising given the number of Lovecraft allusions up to that point). In Lovecraft stories, statements like that usually mean the character has achieved cosmic enlightenment at the cost of their sanity. In the someone more down-to-earth setting of this novel, I suspect it mostly means that Bailey is as mad as a bag of clams. Of course, being mad doesn't make him wrong, either...


Terry Pearce It is quite Lovecraft.

I can appreciate the style of both Part I/II, and of Part III. I think each suits the stage of the book. But I do miss the lyricism we got when we were more focused on Loeser. However, I'm keen to find out what the hell is going on...


LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 2305 comments Terry wrote: "It is quite Lovecraft.

I can appreciate the style of both Part I/II, and of Part III. I think each suits the stage of the book. But I do miss the lyricism we got when we were more focused on Loese..."


Perhaps that's another part of the genius of the book - those of us less entralled by the parts focused on Loeser get our reward for sticking with it in Part III! As I noted in my review of the book, I was debating between giving it 1 or 2 stars until I hit Part III and found myself engaged.


Peter Aronson (peteraronson) | 516 comments Another effect of sticking with the book, is that I, at least, developed a sort of horrified fondness for Loeser (possibly a form of literary Stockholm syndrome?) and wanted to see how he comes out of all this.


Daniel Peter wrote: "Another effect of sticking with the book, is that I, at least, developed a sort of horrified fondness for Loeser (possibly a form of literary Stockholm syndrome?) and wanted to see how he comes out..."

That was eminently chuckle-worthy...


message 12: by Lily (new) - added it

Lily (joy1) | 2465 comments Daniel wrote: "Peter wrote: 'Another effect of sticking with the book, is that I, at least, developed a sort of horrified fondness for Loeser (possibly a form of literary Stockholm syndrome?) and wanted to see ho...'

That was eminently chuckle-worthy..."


And generative of evoking empathy as feasible!


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