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Doha 12
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Group members who write/publish > DOHA 12, international thriller, by Lance Charnes

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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Doha 12 by Lance Charnes Jake Eldar’s and Miriam Schaffer’s names may kill them.

Jake manages a bookstore in Brooklyn. Miriam is a secretary at a Philadelphia law firm. Both grew up in Israel and emigrated to build new lives in America. Neither knows the other exists…until the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad uses their identities in an operation to assassinate a high-ranking Hezbollah commander in Doha, Qatar.

Now Hezbollah plans to kill them both.

Jake, Miriam and ten other innocents in five countries – the Doha 12 – awake to find their identities stolen and their lives caught between Mossad and Hezbollah in an international game of murder and reprisal. Jake stumbles upon Hezbollah’s plot but can't convince the police it exists. When his wife is murdered in a botched hit meant for him, Jake and Miriam try desperately to outrun and outfight their pursuers while shielding Jake's young daughter from the killers on their trail.

Hezbollah, however, has a fallback plan: hundreds of people will die if Jake and Miriam survive.

Inspired by actual events, Doha 12 will sweep you from the suburbs of Beirut and Tel Aviv to a pulse-pounding climax in the wintry streets of Manhattan as Jake and Miriam race along the thin, faded gray line between good and bad, hero and villain, truth and lies.

Doha 12 is available for Kindle through Amazon US/BR/CA/DE/FR/IN/IT/JP/MX/UK
Also available for Nook, Kobo, and iTunes
ePub also available through Chapters Indigo (CA) and Collins (AU)
Trade paperback available through Amazon US/CA/DE/FR/IN/IT/JP/UK | AbeBooks | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository (UK) | Books-a-Million | Booktopia (AU) | Indiebound | Powell's | The Nile (AU) | Vroman's
Trade paperback also available (in English) through Adlibris (SE) | Agapea (ES) | eBook.de (DE) | Suomalainen (FI) | Thalia (DE)


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Kristen Elise, author of The Vesuvius Isotope , explains something I tried (and failed) to do in three attempts -- incorporating science into a thriller without wrecking the science or putting readers to sleep. Maybe I should've tried biology instead of archaeology...

Read her post here: http://www.wombatgroup.com/general/kr...


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Doha 12 is now available on Scribd! If you're already a subscriber, you can read Doha 12 as part of your monthly fee. If you're not, Scribd allows you to read as many books as you like for $8.99 a month, with a free month up front.

Get Doha 12 on Scribd here.


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Nathan Abrams, a professor of film studies in the UK, has written an opinion piece in The Conversation, the title of which says everything you need to know about it: “Mossad Agents Were Suave and Effective on Screen, Now They’re Ineffective Blunderers."

Is he right? In another brush with the Criminal Element , I take on his theory in light of how the other intelligence agencies are faring on big screens and small.

See my conclusions here.


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Ellis Shuman has written a fine review of Doha 12 for The Times of Israel: "breathtaking cat and mouse pursuit...an action-packed thriller in which one exciting climax follows another." Thanks, Ellis!

See the full review here.


message 6: by Werner (last edited Jun 03, 2015 04:39PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Werner | 1550 comments Although I'm not as prestigious a reviewer as the gentleman featured in the post above, I just finished reading Doha 12 yesterday evening, and I have to add my hearty endorsement to his. My review is here: www.goodreads.com/review/show/701898560 . Kudos on an excellent job, Lance! And I'm also looking forward to reading South --hopefully sooner rather than later.


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Wow -- thanks for the great review! I'm glad you liked it so much, and I hope you find South as enjoyable.


Werner | 1550 comments You're welcome, Lance! (I call 'em like I see 'em. :-) )


Werner | 1550 comments Lance, something that was said on another thread got me to thinking of this question: would it be fair to say that Jake and Miriam are really pretty much co-protagonists in Doha 12?


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments That's exactly what I intended -- they're a team of equals. They rescue each other more-or-less the same number of times and contribute equally to their common goals.


Werner | 1550 comments Lance wrote: "That's exactly what I intended -- they're a team of equals. They rescue each other more-or-less the same number of times and contribute equally to their common goals."

The more I thought about the book, the more clear that seemed! We (or at least I --even though I should know better!) tend to have the ingrained stereotypical reflex of tagging the male in those cases as THE protagonist, but that doesn't always reflect reality. When I wrote my own novel (though it's in a different genre, and the rescuing is distributed differently because of symbolic elements unrelated to gender), I always saw my leading couple as co-protagonists; they alternate the role of viewpoint character, and the tale is their common story, not one where one or the other is just along for the ride as the "love interest."


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Lance Charnes (lcharnes) | 67 comments Werner wrote: "I always saw my leading couple as co-protagonists; they alternate the role of viewpoint character, and the tale is their common story, not one where one or the other is just along for the ride as the 'love interest.'"

I think that's a lot more interesting. When you have co-leads with agency, you also have opportunities for their goals or methods to diverge or conflict, and then the tensions involved in getting them back into sync (if they do). They can also fail individually without fatally damaging their joint enterprise.

South has the same setup; Luis and Nora are definitely equals.

One of the things I find myself missing in my current WIP is that when you use first-person POV, it's almost impossible to create a co-lead -- everybody else becomes a sidekick just by the nature of who's telling the story. Maybe someday I'll get to be good enough at this to pull off alternating 1st POVs, but for now, it just isn't in the cards.


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R. Billing (r_billing) | 38 comments Lance wrote: "One of the things I find myself missing in my current WIP is that when you use first-person POV"

When I was young I read John Blaine's "Rick Brant" novels many times. The result of this was that I learned how to do plot and counterplot. The novels are dated now but a very good example of multi-threaded writing.

It's also worth reading David Beaty's "The Take Off" which has about a dozen chapters, each in first person from the point of view of a different character.

Part of the trick is to switch threads at the exact point that the reader needs to know something.


Werner | 1550 comments I've never tried writing fiction in the first person; I only do third person, but from a character's viewpoint. So, in my novel, I simply alternated viewpoints in each chapter. It would be harder, I think, to have two equal protagonists if one were the sole first-person narrator. (You could do it if you alternated first-person narrations, as you mentioned, Lance; but the challenge would be creating two different and consistent narrative voices.)


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