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message 1: by Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ (last edited Jan 04, 2014 12:45PM) (new)

 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments

What are some of the best fairy tales or myths you've read?
What do you know about fairy tales or myths that most may not?
Do you have any unusual fairy tales or myths to share?
This is the place to do so! :) Let us discuss all things fairy tales & myths on this thread.


message 2: by Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ (last edited Jan 04, 2014 11:57AM) (new)

 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments The Witch Must Die: The Hidden Meaning Of Fairy Tales

The Witch Must Die The Hidden Meaning Of Fairy Tales by Sheldon Cashdan

This is one of my favorite books on fairy tales and specifically the notion of the witch, evil stepmother, and other antagonists in fairy tales.


message 3: by LaLaLa Laura (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) | 4443 comments Mod
What a great thread! Thanks Jen! Can't wait to read what we all have to share!


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Thanks Laura :)


message 5: by Melanti (new)

Melanti I'm a big fairy tale fan... In fact, I'm in the Into the Forest group that does nothing but talk about myths, fairy tales and retellings - so if anyone really likes the subject, come visit!

Something that's interesting is that most of the original versions of fairy tales are not the Disney-ish confections we think of today and many were rather gruesome.

The one that has most surprised me is "Beauty and the Beast." Today we think of the story as a love story - don't judge a man by what he looks like, etc - but that's not what the story was about originally.

It was originally a 18th century French novella by Madame de Villeneuve. And in that version, it was actually more about submitting to arranged marriages. In fact, Beauty dreams of the prince in his human form and falls in love with him in her dreams. She then decides to turn her back on her dream lover in order to marry the beast. Since, after all, doing your duty and submitting to the wishes of your family is much more important than mere love.

It was Robin McKinley's Beauty and Rose Daughter that got me addicted to fairy tale retellings way back when I was a teenager and I've been reading them ever since.


message 6: by LaLaLa Laura (last edited Jan 04, 2014 02:32PM) (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) | 4443 comments Mod
I read The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales about a year ago, and it was definitely cool to see how the stories were originally told. For example, in order to fit into the glass slippers in Cinderella, the step sisters cut parts of their feet off! My goodness. I can't imagine how badly you need a date to do that!


message 7: by Melanti (new)

Melanti The one with the biggest "ewww" factor for me in Grimms was Sleeping Beauty. She didn't wake up from a kiss... She woke up when one of her two children sucked the splinter out of her finger.

What children, you ask? Why, the children she had with Prince Charming while she slept!


message 8: by LaLaLa Laura (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) | 4443 comments Mod
Melanti wrote: "The one with the biggest "ewww" factor for me in Grimms was Sleeping Beauty. She didn't wake up from a kiss... She woke up when one of her two children sucked the splinter out of her finger.

Wh..."


yes, I would say Disney clearly made some "revisions." or clean up should I say!


message 9: by Julia (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Melanti, one of my former students is signed up for "Into the Forest", although she's busy making films based on fairy tales/myths, so doesn't participate much.

However, she DID get permission from Neil Gaiman to produce his Snow, Glass, Apples as a theater performance, and he was delighted; he's offered to let her use more of his material.

Gaiman is one who can retain all the original darkness of a tale--and THEN some! This version is for the adult reader and is found in his collection Smoke and Mirrors.

"The story retells the famous fairy tale of Snow White from the point of view of Snow White's stepmother, who is traditionally the villain of the piece but is here depicted as struggling desperately — and ultimately, unsuccessfully, as the "happy ending" takes place on schedule — to save the kingdom from her unnatural and monstrous stepdaughter." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow,_Gl...


message 10: by Melanti (new)

Melanti I wonder what Disney would make of "Donkeyskin"? It's one of Perrault's tales.

A beautiful dying queen makes the King promise that he'll never marry anyone less beautiful than her. The widowed King searches high and low, looking for anyone more beautiful than his previous wife.

He eventually comes to the conclusion that the only person he could possibly marry is his own daughter, who has grown up to be more beautiful than her mother.

The girl delays him by asking for impossible ball gowns, but when she realizes the king won't be put off for long, she runs away to a neighboring kingdom where she works in the kitchen and secretly attends various court functions in the gowns, and it ends much like in Cinderella...


message 11: by Melanti (new)

Melanti Julia wrote: "Melanti, one of my former students is signed up for "Into the Forest", although she's busy making films based on fairy tales/myths, so doesn't participate much.

However, she DID get permission fro..."


I love Gaiman! Not only is he a fantastic writer and narrator, but by all accounts he's just an all-around nice guy!


message 12: by Julia (last edited Jan 04, 2014 03:52PM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) So true, Melanti--and his American Gods is one of my favorite books. I taught mythology, and what he does in that book is simply incredible--tying together so many forms of myth.

I was especially glad to see Anansi, the Spider God of West Africa. "Anansi (/əˈnɑːnsi/ ə-NAHN-see) the trickster is a West African god. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the god of all knowledge of stories. He is also one of the most important characters of West African and Caribbean folklore. He is also known as Ananse, Kwaku Ananse, and Anancy; and in the southern United States he has evolved into Aunt Nancy. He is a spider, but often acts and appears as a man." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anansi

So when Gaiman calls him "Mr. Nancy", he's staying true to the myth :-)


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments This is one of my favorite African myths that I learned about in an Origins class in college:

Ekoi(South Nigeria):
In the beginning there were two gods, Obassi Osaw and Obassi Nsi. The two gods created everything together. Then Obassi Osaw decided to live in the sky and Obassi Nsi decided to live on the earth. The god in the sky gives light and moisture, but also brings drought and storms. The god of the earth nurtures, and takes the people back to him when they die. One day long ago Obassi Osaw made a man and a woman, and placed them upon the earth. They knew nothing so Obassi Nsi taught them about planting and hunting to get food.

What I love about these origin stories are the similarities in the human imagination. :)


message 14: by Julia (last edited Jan 05, 2014 04:33AM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Jen ƸӜƷ wrote: "This is one of my favorite African myths that I learned about in an Origins class in college:

Ekoi(South Nigeria):
In the beginning there were two gods, Obassi Osaw and Obassi Nsi. The two gods cr..."


Jen, you're so right about origin stories--they can be so involved and creative, right out of the human imagination :-) I found this site: http://www.bigmyth.com/2_eng_myths.html It was highly commended by the MEDEA awards in Brussels, and the founder has a great explanation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvC9F...

"The Big Myth is a new experimental learning module designed for use in European primary school classrooms. It is a sociology textbook for the comparative study of world creation mythology. The myths are told using Flash animation and are accompanied by an overview of the culture, the pantheon of the gods and a series of exercises based on that culture. The Big Myth combines the internet and Flash animation as a presentational medium with a highly progressive group learning method known as complex instruction. Teachers are advised to start in the teacher's section for more complete instructions. The Big Myth consists of the Mythology section, Links and Bibliography for further research, a Write Your Own Creation Myth section for students, the Teacher's Guide and a Discussion Forum where an off-line debate is held over the material." http://mythicjourneys.org/bigmyth/2_e...

Since "The Big Myth" is for primary students, the animations are very short and basic, but how wonderful to have children begin to think about these stories at an early age!


message 15: by LaLaLa Laura (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) | 4443 comments Mod
I can't post pictures from my phone app but I saw a necklace that says

"I still believe in 398.2"


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Julia wrote: "Jen ƸӜƷ wrote: "This is one of my favorite African myths that I learned about in an Origins class in college:

Ekoi(South Nigeria):
In the beginning there were two gods, Obassi Osaw and Obassi Nsi...."


A great idea indeed!


message 17: by LaLaLa Laura (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) | 4443 comments Mod
Melanti wrote: "I'm a big fairy tale fan... In fact, I'm in the Into the Forest group that does nothing but talk about myths, fairy tales and retellings - so if anyone really likes the subject, come visit!

Someth..."


Hi Melanti. Looks cool. I didn't know you were a moderator as well! Feel free to encourage your members to join in on our thread here as well!


message 18: by Tea✿Rose (new)

Tea✿Rose (dollygirl) | 17 comments I love fairytales! Favorite book in that genre is Tithe by Holly Black. Was really interesting and the writing creates very vivid imagery! *__*
I'm willing to bet everyone already knows this, but after reading many fairytales, I learned that the difference between fairie and faerie is that one is "good" while the other is "evil" (essentially). I also learned that unicorns aren't the cute creatures people think they are. In many myths, they're in fact deadly, except to female virgins. Have a feeling less people know about that tidbit - when I found out about it, I could no longer look at unicorns the same way. o__0


message 19: by Tea✿Rose (last edited Jan 09, 2014 11:07AM) (new)

Tea✿Rose (dollygirl) | 17 comments Oh yes!
I read the book titled The Water Mirror (a really great fantasy book) and it depicted mermaids as being very vicious creatures with sharp teeth that could bite through metal! o_O
It was pretty intense since it was the first time I witnessed mermaids being depicted in that kind of way; and get this: their mouths open and stretch big enough to cover half of their face!!
They were still very beautiful and graceful, though (somehow) - just not as nice and sweet as I imagined, since their beauty was mainly used to lure men in to eat for dinner... :O


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments ✿ Wendy wrote: "I love fairytales! Favorite book in that genre is Tithe by Holly Black. Was really interesting and the writing creates very vivid imagery! *__*
I'm willing to bet everyone already knows this, but a..."


Do you have any suggestions on books with the different types of fairies/faeries and stories of unicorns?


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments ✿ Wendy wrote: "Oh yes!
I read the book titled The Water Mirror (a really great fantasy book) and it depicted mermaids as being very vicious creatures with sharp teeth that could bite through metal! o_O
It was pre..."


Once Upon a Time did a pretty good job at depicting the mermaids, with reference to them being dangerous, destructive forces working with dangerous seas.


message 22: by Tea✿Rose (last edited Jan 10, 2014 09:19PM) (new)

Tea✿Rose (dollygirl) | 17 comments Jen ƸӜƷ wrote: "Do you have any suggestions on books with the different types of fairies/faeries and stories of unicorns?"


Well, the book I read about the deadly unicorns was kinda boring to me. I managed to finish it and learn a lot about unicorns in the process, but reading it was slightly painful. If you want to check it out though, it's called Rampant.
As for books that include the fairies and faeries...? I'm not so sure.
I read Tithe and they only had faeries - like fairies, but more sinister; they'd kidnap children and trade a changeling version of the original child back to the parents, etc.
I've never read a book that had both in it, since it's kinda like they live in separate worlds.

But you should check out Tithe if you're a teen or young-adult. The unicorns/deadly horses do make their appearances, but barely, since they play a considerably small role in the story.
Also, Ash by Malinda Lo was pretty good; it's very eloquently written. Not many unicorns in it either, though, if at all.
Sorry! I mean, I'm sure they're out there. I just don't read as much fantasy as I do other genres these days so I wouldn't know. :(


message 23: by Tea✿Rose (last edited Jan 10, 2014 09:15PM) (new)

Tea✿Rose (dollygirl) | 17 comments Jen ƸӜƷ wrote: "Once Upon a Time did a pretty good job at depicting the mermaids, with reference to them being dangerous, destructive forces working with dangerous seas. "
I've never read or heard of that book. :o
So thanks for telling me about it - I'll make sure to check it out later! :)

Edit: Who's the author?
The first result was a book that's basically a collection of many different fantasy stories - was that what you're talking about?
Also, were you asking me for a recommendation of that type? A book that's a collection of stories, specifically about unicorns, faeries, and fairies?
If so, then I'm sorry but I don't know any. :(


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Thanks Wendy, I'll keep looking and I actually was interested in a non fiction book about the different types of fairies.

Once Upon a Time is a TV show on Sunday night where fairy tales are altered with connections created and personalities changed of the fairy tales we know.


message 25: by Julia (last edited Jan 11, 2014 10:07AM) (new)


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments I think I am going to have to give Purkiss' work a spin :)


message 27: by Melanti (new)

Melanti Those Froud books are a lot of fun to browse through. I wouldn't vouch for the accuracy of the folklore but he's a fantastic artist.


message 28: by LaLaLa Laura (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) | 4443 comments Mod
deadly unicorns and destructive mermaids? I never knew what fairy takes were really like!


message 29: by Tea✿Rose (last edited Jan 11, 2014 09:00PM) (new)

Tea✿Rose (dollygirl) | 17 comments Oh, I know it then. My best friend loves it! But I don't really watch TV so I've never seen it for myself. That's interesting though.

And haha Alicia. It's pretty cool, I know! :D


message 30: by Julia (last edited Jan 11, 2014 02:12PM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Melanti wrote: "Those Froud books are a lot of fun to browse through. I wouldn't vouch for the accuracy of the folklore but he's a fantastic artist."

He certainly is, Melanti--and he worked with Jim Henson on several projects, including the film LABYRINTH. Here's one of my favorite images by Froud:




message 31: by Melanti (new)

Melanti I like that one. Looks like it might be a self-portrait?

I thought Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book was hilarious. He teamed up with Terry Jones (of Monte Python fame) to tell the story of a girl who found out that she could capture impressions of faeries by snapping her journal shut on them...

This random internet blogger has some random pages from the book: http://forthelifeofmeg.blogspot.com/2...


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Melanti wrote: "Those Froud books are a lot of fun to browse through. I wouldn't vouch for the accuracy of the folklore but he's a fantastic artist."

I agree love his art :)


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Julia wrote: "Melanti wrote: "Those Froud books are a lot of fun to browse through. I wouldn't vouch for the accuracy of the folklore but he's a fantastic artist."

He certainly is, Melanti--and he worked with ..."


And The Dark Crystal :)


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Melanti wrote: "I like that one. Looks like it might be a self-portrait?

I thought Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book was hilarious. He teamed up with Terry Jones (of Monte Python fame) to tell ..."


I have that one!


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Julia wrote: "I just ordered the DVD of "Mythic Journeys" from my library; Amazon says:

"With gorgeous stop-motion animation and enlightening interviews, Mythic Journeys seeks to reclaim the power of myth, whic..."


Sounds awesome, will have to look it up. :)


message 36: by Julia (last edited Jan 17, 2014 03:26PM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) I just checked this out from the library: Faeries: Deluxe Collector's Edition. This edition came out in 2010, and is simply magical, combining the work of Froud and Alan Lee (who live just doors from each other in Devon!)

I loved this comment by Betty Ballantine in the introduction: "Fairie is a world of dark enchantments, of captivating beauty, of enormous ugliness, of callous superficiality, of humour, mischief, joy and inspiration. It is far richer than fiction would general lead one to believe and, beyond that, it is a world to enter with extreme caution..."

The foreward is by Jane Yolen, who points to this book as the cornerstone of her huge collection. She says that this book "has become, in the world of fairy tales, a kind of talisman, a touchstone, that has not lost its own glamor in the thirty years since it was published. Fairy-tale lovers still keep it, as I did, as the lynchpin of their libraries."




message 37: by Julia (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Amazon says this:

"A quarter of a century after its initial publication, and with more than a million copies in print worldwide, Brian Froud and Alan Lee’s Faeries is a certified fantasy classic. Now, Froud and Lee return to their most enduring and beloved work in this deluxe anniversary edition. This ultimate collector’s book features eight new pieces of art by Froud and Lee with the original pencil drawings and watercolors.

More than just a reissue, this deluxe revised and updated edition contains essays from both Froud and Lee on the continuing influence of Faeries. There is also a foreword by bestselling author Jane Yolen."


message 38: by Heather (new)

Heather (clockwork_wings) | 10 comments Scary Tales on netflix is pretty cool. It shows you an old-school version of a familiar story, while explaining the real-life events or morals of the story.

For instance, in the village of Hamelin, as in "Pied Piper of," there is a window that reads something to the effect of, "It's been XXXX since the piper lead our children away."

Let that sink in a moment.


message 39: by Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ (last edited Jan 31, 2014 09:43PM) (new)

 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments A musical being made into a movie, Into the Woods , is coming out this December and has a fairy tale theme:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2180411/


message 40: by Julia (last edited Feb 01, 2014 12:40AM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Oh, Into the Woods is my favorite musical! I have the DVD of the Bernadette Peters version--she was incredible as the Witch, and I'm looking forward to seeing Meryl Streep tackle that part. This is Stephen Sondheim, so the music is really intricate and overlapping--and simply magical! Act I ends with the song "Ever After"--and then Act II takes us to much darker places.



One of the funniest songs is "Agony", where Cinderella's Prince and Rapunzel's Prince sing of their love: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFgMo...

However, I just read this: "Overall, the screen adaptation by James Lapine is fairly close to his original stage musical. The only large change is the replacement of the Narrator using the Baker's voiceover for the narration. Another noticeable change is the cut of the Mysterious Man.

BIG mistake imho--in the stage production,the same actor plays both the Narrator and Mysterious Man, who ends up being the Baker's father! I'm becoming concerned that the "Disneyfication" of such an unusual musical may water it down in terms of the deeper themes.

Disney can get carried away with sets and special effects; for example, the giant is NEVER actually seen in the stage version, and that's an important choice NOT just based on technical issues.

Have to wait and see--but I just learned that Alan Cumming was considered for the Wolf before Depp, and I wish he'd been cast instead.


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Alan Cumming would be a far better wolf, in my opinion.


message 42: by Julia (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) I agree--somehow Johnny Depp seems to have lost his way after Jack Sparrow. And Cumming has that "sly" quality the Wolf needs :-)


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments Oh so very true...


message 44: by Julia (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) After reading What-the-Dickens: The Story of a Rogue Tooth Fairy by Gregory Maguire, I began thinking about the role the Tooth Fairy has played in other books.

The Tooth Fairy by Graham Joyce is my favorite, albeit a dark story. I recommended it for "people who aren't afraid of the dark", and said this in my review:

"What I remembered, rather than learned, was how really terrifying childhood and adolescence can be! The character of the "Tooth Fairy", at once both horrifying and mesmerizing, wraps up all those childhood (pre-puberty) and teenage (puberty) fears into one repelling yet intriguing character. The story centers on 3 boys--Sam, Clive, and Terry--and begins with a large pike from the local pond biting off two of Terry's toes. It's a rollercoaster ride after that, and a dark one at that--imagine riding a rollercoaster alone in the dark by yourself, and that's how my stomach felt by the end. I can't imagine what fills Joyce's brain (spiders and centipedes, to say the least)--but he really wants to save these children from dark fears and knows he can't. So there's a desperation throughout the book--a long, dark road from Sam losing his first tooth to the boys/young men headed off to college. Linda and Alice serve mainly as foils, especially for the boys' sexual awakening, but Joyce managed to make me care for them as well. As usual, Joyce rips the comfortable veil off of reality, and what lies behind it, in this book, are the sharp, filed teeth of the Tooth Fairy." https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 45: by Heather (new)

Heather (clockwork_wings) | 10 comments Anyone ever seen the Ever After High webseries? They're surprisingly good and the puns more tolerable than the Monster High counterparts. It seems to be the in-thing to present the Evil Queen as misunderstood and in desperate need of a hug.


message 46: by Julia (last edited May 19, 2014 04:43AM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) True, Heather--that's one of the reasons I love Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West so much. Elphaba is the top example for me of letting us see the backstory of "evil" characters, and the musical was wonderful.


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments I enjoyed Oz the Great and Powerful's look at how the wicked witch came to be.



message 48: by Julia (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) I've read American Gods several times, and we're reading it in another goodreads group. For those of you who have read it or plan to, here's an excellent site that identifies all the gods Gaiman uses. He even gave this site a "shout out" in his journal, back in 2003.

http://www.frowl.org/gods/gods.html

And the filming of the book has been dropped by HBO, but picked up by FreemantleMedia: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014...


message 49: by Julia (last edited May 19, 2014 04:43AM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) I'm interested in exploring non-European fairytales, and found The Broken Tusk: Stories of the Hindu God Ganesha by Uma Krishnaswami. The book, written for young children, focuses on the myths and stories surrounding Ganesha, the Hindu deity with an elephant head. One Amazon comment says:

"The Broken Tusk: Stories of the Hindu God Ganesha tells seventeen different stories of Ganesha in easy reader format for second grade and up. The stories also lend themselves well to the read-aloud format for younger children. Many of my old favorites are here including the ones about how Ganesha got his elephant head and about how he made a "pradakshina" around his parents, into a trip around the world....Krishnaswami has done a thorough professional job with this one. She has prefaced the book with a brief introduction to Hindu mythology and to the god Ganesha himself. Also complementing the stories are a glossary of terms, a list of characters (kids would appreciate that!), a list of other names for Ganesha, and a pronunciation guide.

Krishnaswami finishes every story she narrates with a line or two that ties the legend to modern day reality. For example, after the story about Ganesha's head, Krishnaswami explains that in Indian (especially South Indian) temples today, sometimes elephants are fed and maintained reverentially. These acts, Krishnaswami explains, probably acknowledge the sacrifice made by the elephant in the original story. Small explanations like these place the stories in context, a service that I think is especially useful. The last word belongs to the wonderful old-world illustrations by Maniam Selven that complement the stories wonderfully."


 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu (jennschu) | 7041 comments I have a book of aborigine myth tales.The Flying Emu And Other Australian Stories Wonderful stories :)


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