The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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Genre Discussions > Cozy Crime / Traditional Whodunnits General Discussion

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message 1: by PollyPips (new)

PollyPips | 1 comments I love the Agatha Raisin series by M.C Beaton and the Booktown Mysteries by Lorna Barrett.


message 2: by Luann (new)

Luann (azbookgal) | 47 comments *Mrs. Pollifax books by Dorothy Gilman

*Aunt Dimity mysteries by Nancy Atherton

*Southern Sisters mysteries by Anne George

*The Cat who... books by Lilian Jackson Braun

*China Bayles mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert

*Chocoholic mysteries by JoAnna Carl


message 3: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 30 comments I love the Aunt Dimity's! I'm glad this topic came up, cause I'm looking for some new cozies.


message 4: by Gail (new)

Gail | 15 comments Needlecraft mysteries by Monica Ferris
any by Dorothy Cannell


message 5: by Jamie (last edited Jun 22, 2009 01:41PM) (new)

Jamie I'm a big fan of the Stephanie Plum series, and I've also enjoyed The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency and Mum's the Word. Another good series is Thistle and Twigg by Mary Saums. I've read The Chocolate Chip Cookie Murder too, though, and thought it was one of the worst books I've read. I won't be reading any more from that series.


JG (Introverted Reader) I love

The Pink Carnation mysteries by Lauren Willig. These are heavy on romance, but I do love them.

The Nursery Crime books and Thursday Next books by Jasper Fforde. These are fantasy, but there are mysteries to be solved too. They're a lot of fun.

The Goldy Bear Culinary mysteries by Diane Mott Davidson

The Mrs. Murphy books by Rita Mae Brown

The Beatrix Potter mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert

I've only read one of these, but Deadly Nightshade was okay.

I agree with those who recommended Stephanie Plum, Aunt Dimity, Agatha Raisin, and the earlier Cat Who books.


message 7: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) The Beatrix Potter mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert

I would also recommend her China Bayles series.




message 8: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Another series by M. C. Beaton - Hamish McBeth. A police constible in a small Scottish village. Terrific.


message 9: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Teresa wrote: "The Beatrix Potter mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert

I would also recommend her China Bayles series.

"


Are they children's books, or just by her? I have never heard of them, but who doesn't love Peter?




message 10: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Susan Wittig Albert

It is an adult series set in Texas. China is a former lawyer who wanted out of the rat race and moved somewhere quieter. She now runs a herb/garden store which has expanded over the years. She has Ruby as her best friend and other close friends too. The books age naturally through the series with normal personal things that would happen over a life. The mysteries are solid and for me it just like catching up with old friends. No real violence and some humorous moments and you even for China when she has bad things happen to her.


JG (Introverted Reader) The Beatrix Potter books are fiction with Beatrix Potter as the main character, living at the farm she bought. They're cute little books. It's been a while since I picked one up, but I believe the cats and badgers and other animals occasionally get chapters to tell what they know about the mystery. They're a lot of fun if that's your kind of thing. They're shelved in the adult section at my library.


message 12: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 30 comments That China Bayles series looks great. The first one is called Thyme of Death.


message 13: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 04, 2009 03:32PM) (new)

I know I mentioned it somewhere else, but thought I'd do so again here, in it's proper thread.
Shirley Rousseau Murphy

Talking, detecting cats, Murphy had cats personalities down pat. Nice locations too.

Would
Sue Grafton's books qualify? I have enjoyed the majority of the alphabet series.


message 14: by Chris (new)

Chris C I love to curl up with any Hamish MacBeth by M.C.Beaton also Agatha Raisin they are really what I call cosy crimes.


message 15: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Hi Chris, I'm a huge fan of the Hamish MacBeth series and the TV series too. They are indeed cozies, just what I like to read on a rainy afternoon.


message 16: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 30 comments I LOVE LOVE LOVE Sue Grafton, but I don't know if I'd call her books cozies. I am rereading B is for Burglar now, and I find it completely to be a comfort read. I just love her, she's so funny and sarcastic.


message 17: by Chris (new)

Chris C Donna wrote: "Hi Chris, I'm a huge fan of the Hamish MacBeth series and the TV series too. They are indeed cozies, just what I like to read on a rainy afternoon."

I have never seen the TV series, in fact didn't even know there was one. What is it called and who plays Hamish?


message 18: by Chris (new)

Chris C Fiona wrote: "Robert Carlyle played Hamish and it was just called Hamish Macbeth.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111993/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91nRyA..."


Many thanks Fiona, I will try to find it on DVD and have a look on youtube.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 554 comments They were shown on BBC America a year or so ago, I think.


message 20: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
I just finished A Reconstructed Corpse by Simon Brett. It's the first book by him that I've read and I did enjoy it. I think this one was pretty far into the Charlie Paris series so I will have to check my library for some of the earlier ones in the series.


message 21: by So_Many_Books (new)

So_Many_Books (so_many_books_so_little_time) | 2 comments I LOVE M.C. Beaton's Agatha Raisin series!
I am currently on book #4 Agatha Raisin and the Walkers of Dembley.




JG (Introverted Reader) They are a lot of fun, aren't they? I can't help but like Agatha in spite of herself!


message 23: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (sharon2020) I really enjoy Laura Childs Tea Shop and Scrapbook cozies. Have read them all and she has another series in the works. The tea series especially has a great cast of characters.


message 24: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (nancykh) | 13 comments True cozies are also written by Robin Paige in her victorian series. I have enjoyed several of her titles. A list of cozies must include Elizabeth Peters and Miss Amelia Peabody.


message 25: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa (vanessamc) Love the "Cat Who" series by Lilian Jackson Braun. A lot of humor and great characters. The audio books are great. They are read by George Guidall and he is awesome. A word of caution, though. She is no longer living and the more recent ones were written by a ghost writer and aren't nearly as good.


message 26: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 36379 comments I used to read these books. Maybe I just read too many of them. But they started to seem the same to me. Plus the fact that I don't even like cats. When these two thoughts hit home I swore off the "Cat Who" books.

I didn't know she was no longer living though. I wonder how long ago she died - was it when I decided they all seemed the same?


JG (Introverted Reader) I didn't know that either. The latest ones really have been terrible. I finally gave up.


message 28: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa (vanessamc) I'm not sure of the year she died, but I believe the last one she did was The Cat Who Brought Down the House. I know for sure that the Bananas one and the Turkey one are not hers and all the ones after that. The very latest ones, I think, are awful. I stopped reading them too.


JG (Introverted Reader) The Banana one is the one that I think of as being the first of the worst.


message 30: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa (vanessamc) I honestly couldn't remember where I read that she had died, and so I just did some research on the internet. It seems there is some disagreement on whether she is still alive or not. I found excerpts from an interview she supposedly did in 2005. One site said she was born in 1911 and Wikipedia says 1913 and says she is still alive and living with her family. Other people say she is still alive and not writing and that recent books have indeed been written by a ghost writer. It has also been reported that her publisher is not commenting and that her family at one time asked for everyone to give her a little space, whatever that means. Some say her age has been a hindrance to her writing and that's why the later books weren't as good. I was convinced I read for certain she had died, and really never considered I could be wrong until some of the posts on the board seemed to indicate that it was not common knowledge. Sorry, I didn't mean to mislead anyone. If she is still alive, then she is in her late 90's. But whether alive or not, ghost writer or not the early books in the series are great, and they are a unique set of books and well worth the read.


message 31: by Afsana (new)

Afsana (afsanaz) | 179 comments Vanessa wrote: "I honestly couldn't remember where I read that she had died, and so I just did some research on the internet. It seems there is some disagreement on whether she is still alive or not. I found excer..."

she would be round 97 and I am trying hard to believe that someone could have the faculties left to writer still (when I mean write I mean a book to sell)


message 32: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 36379 comments Not all people necessarily lose their faculties.

It is true that when my father died at the age of 88 he wasn't the writer that he once was. But he could still write. Of course, he wasn't trying to sell any books.

My mother, at 92, still works and has no problem. Her work is done out of the home. It is only within the last month that she has come to the realization that she should not drive at night. She apparently drove into a ditch. But a teen-ager came out and helped and drove her home.

Of course, then there is also the question of how long she has had a ghost writer, should she still be alive. For a good number of years it has been known that Margaret Truman used a ghost writer. She probably did do the first few herself. But it is probably just much easier using a ghost writer. Carolyn Keene has done it for years.


message 33: by Afsana (new)

Afsana (afsanaz) | 179 comments Jan wrote: "Not all people necessarily lose their faculties.

It is true that when my father died at the age of 88 he wasn't the writer that he once was. But he could still write. Of course, he wasn't trying..."


didn't mean to offend-I didn't mean faculties but more over the ability to sit and write a novel to sell-writing a book is hard work or so writers lead us to believe and takes alot of time and energy


message 34: by Joyce (new)

Joyce | 21 comments I'd add Joanna Fluke to the list of enjoyable cozies. Also G. A. McKevett, Jill Churchill, Clea Simon, Carolyn Hart, and Sandra Balzo, Mary Daheim, and Katherine Hall Page.


message 35: by Beth (new)

Beth | 408 comments For funny cozy mystery authors, I recommend Donna Andrews and Tim Cockey.

For Western themes, I recommend Margaret Coel and C.J. Box.

I've read a rated quite a few cozy mysteries, if you'd like to peruse my book list, and I welcome new mystery reading and writing friends.


message 36: by Shannon (last edited Apr 02, 2010 06:37PM) (new)

Shannon (darwindog96) Sharon wrote: "I really enjoy Laura Childs Tea Shop and Scrapbook cozies. Have read them all and she has another series in the works. The tea series especially has a great cast of characters."

I agree completely - have only read the tea series but do like the three main characters...definitely cozy reading!

I would also add the Louise Penny series with the main character of Armand Gamache - quick reads and interesting characters that recur.


message 37: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 36379 comments I only recently discovered Louise Penny. I just think she is a gem.


message 38: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
I've only read Still Life by Louise Penny, which was the first, and I really enjoyed it. You could tell it had the makings of a good series.


message 39: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 36379 comments I'm in the middle of the third book, The Cruelest Month: A Three Pines Mystery and she just builds on the situation presented in the first book.

The real surprise, at least to me, was the addition of curling in A Fatal Grace.


message 40: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Hi Jan, Well, now I just may have to push A Fatal Grace up on my TBR list since it includes curling. I really, really enjoyed the curling matches on the recent Olympics.


message 41: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1358 comments I'm reading a book I think would qualify as a cozy crime book. It's The Christmas Train, by David Baldacci. If you want to read a book that will make you feel good, this could be it.


message 42: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
I recently finished Bruno, Chief of Police and fans of the Hamish MacBeth series would probably enjoy this one. Small village cop in the lovely Dordogne area of France. Good mystery too.


message 43: by Kate (last edited May 09, 2010 10:46AM) (new)

Kate | 6 comments Ann Purser has a new series started. It looks good!

The Hangman's Row Enquiry
Ann Purser

Ivy Beasley #1
Berkley Prime Crime
May 2010
On Sale: May 4, 2010
Featuring: Ivy Beasley
320 pages
ISBN: 0425234738
EAN: 9780425234730
Paperback
$7.99

Mystery Woman Sleuth, Mystery Cozy

The Hangman's Row Enquiry: An Ivy Beasley MysteryIvy Beasley from Round Ringford days has moved to an old folks` residence in Barrington, a small village in Suffolk. Stroppy and autocratic as ever, she is busy shaping the place up to her standards, when Augustus Halfhide, tall, thin and oddly attractive in a wispy kind of way, moves into Hangman`s Row in the village. He is a mystery, determined to give nothing away about his past, and when he offers to see Ivy home from church one day, it is the beginning of an unlikely and fruitful relationship.

Alongside Ivy, Gus enlists Ivy`s much younger cousin Deirdre, and Ivy`s admirer, Roy Goodman, in setting up a detective agency called Enquire Within. Almost immediately, their first case makes its shocking appearance in the village. Another resident of Hangman`s Row, an old woman known for her sharp tongue and persecution of her hapless daughter Miriam, is found far from well on the floor of her cottage.

Enquire Within is in business!

http://freshfiction.com/book.php?id=3...


message 44: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Hi Kate, I've never read anything by Ann Purser but this sounds interesting. More for my TBR list!


message 45: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 36379 comments Kate wrote: "Ann Purser has a new series started. It looks good!

The Hangman's Row Enquiry
Ann Purser

Ivy Beasley #1
Berkley Prime Crime
May 2010
On Sale: May 4, 2010
Featuring: Ivy Beasley
320 pages
ISBN: 0..."


Sounds like this is a spin-off series then from her Lois Meade series. Does this mean that Lois is being abandoned?

I wouldn't say that the Lois Meade series is all that great but whoever thinks about how much a cleaning service could learn about the clean for. Makes you think. Of course, I generally only get a cleaning service when I am moving.


message 46: by Kate (new)

Kate | 6 comments I didn't care much for the Lois Meade series -- in fact, abandoned it before I got to Friday. But your cleaning lady does know an awful lot about you, & probably things you'd rather she didn't know. I still use one on a regular basis when I can afford it -- it saves my aching back!


message 47: by Melanie (new)

Melanie Jackson (melaniejaxn) | 13 comments My favorite cozy writer is Charlotte MacLeod/Alisa Craig. There has been nothing new for a few years and have put off googling her for fear she has passed away :-(... I like Hamish, but not Agatha.


message 48: by Melanie (new)

Melanie Jackson (melaniejaxn) | 13 comments Oh no! Well, I suspected as much. I do wish they would put her books out in e-format. My older paperbacks are crumbling and even some of her obscure hardbacks are beginning to look tattered.


message 49: by Melodie (new)

Melodie (melodieco) One of my favorite cozy series that I haven't seen mentioned in this thread is Earlene Fowler's Benni Harper series. The characters are like old friends, and Benni's grandma, Dove, reminds me of my own "Mamaw" who has been gone some years now.


*Suzy (ereaderuser)* (suzyereaderuser) Can you explain what you mean by cozy series?


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