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Antony and Cleopatra (Masters of Rome, #7)
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ROMAN EMPIRE -THE HISTORY... > 10. ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA ~ November 25th ~ December 1st ~ PART FIVE – War - 32 BC to 30 BC - Sections 23 - 26 - (417-485); No Spoilers Please

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message 1: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new) - rated it 3 stars

Vicki Cline | 3835 comments Mod
Hello Everyone,

For the week of November 25th - December 1st, we are reading Part Five - War - 32 BC to 30 BC - Sections 23 - 26 of the book Antony and Cleopatra.

The tenth week's reading assignment is:

Week 10
– November 25th - December 1st
Part Five - War - 32 BC to 30 BC - Sections 23 - 26 - (417-485)

We will open up a thread for each week's reading. Please make sure to post in the particular thread dedicated to those specific chapters and page numbers to avoid spoilers. We will also open up supplemental threads as we did for other spotlighted books.

This book was kicked off on September 23rd.

We look forward to your participation. Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Borders and other noted on line booksellers do have copies of the book and shipment can be expedited. The book can also be obtained easily at your local library, or on your Kindle. This weekly thread will be opened up on November 25th.

There is no rush and we are thrilled to have you join us. It is never too late to get started and/or to post.

Vicki Cline will be moderating this discussion and the back-up will be Jill.

Welcome,

Bentley

TO ALWAYS SEE ALL WEEKS' THREADS, SELECT VIEW ALL

Antony and Cleopatra (Masters of Rome, #7) by Colleen McCullough by Colleen McCullough Colleen McCullough

REMEMBER NO SPOILERS ON THE WEEKLY NON SPOILER THREADS - ON EACH WEEKLY NON SPOILER THREAD - WE ONLY DISCUSS THE PAGES ASSIGNED OR THE PAGES WHICH WERE COVERED IN PREVIOUS WEEKS. IF YOU GO AHEAD OR WANT TO ENGAGE IN MORE EXPANSIVE DISCUSSION - POST THOSE COMMENTS IN ONE OF THE SPOILER THREADS. THESE CHAPTERS HAVE A LOT OF INFORMATION SO WHEN IN DOUBT CHECK WITH THE CHAPTER OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY TO RECALL WHETHER YOUR COMMENTS ARE ASSIGNMENT SPECIFIC. EXAMPLES OF SPOILER THREADS ARE THE GLOSSARY, THE BIBLIOGRAPHY, THE INTRODUCTION AND THE BOOK AS A WHOLE THREADS.

Notes:


It is always a tremendous help when you quote specifically from the book itself and reference the chapter and page numbers when responding. The text itself helps folks know what you are referencing and makes things clear.

Citations:

If an author or book is mentioned other than the book and author being discussed, citations must be included according to our guidelines. Also, when citing other sources, please provide credit where credit is due and/or the link. There is no need to re-cite the author and the book we are discussing however.

Here is the link to the thread titled Mechanics of the Board which will help you with the citations and how to do them.

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...

Introduction Thread:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1...

Table of Contents and Syllabus

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1...

Glossary

Remember there is a glossary thread where ancillary information is placed by the moderator. This is also a thread where additional information can be placed by the group members regarding the subject matter being discussed.

Here is the link:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/8...

Bibliography

There is a Bibliography where books cited in the text are posted with proper citations and reviews. We also post the books that the author may have used in his research or in her notes. Please also feel free to add to the Bibliography thread any related books, etc. with proper citations or other books either nonfiction or historical fiction that relate to the subject matter of the book itself. No self-promotion, please.

Here is the link:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/8...

Book as a Whole and Final Thoughts - SPOILER THREAD

Antony and Cleopatra (Masters of Rome, #7) by Colleen McCullough by Colleen McCullough Colleen McCullough


message 2: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new) - rated it 3 stars

Vicki Cline | 3835 comments Mod
Chapter Overview and Summaries

Part V

War - 32 BC to 30 BC

Section – 23


Cleopatra has been trying to get Antony to invade Italy in order to defeat Octavian, but he doesn’t want to start a civil war. He does agree to move the armies and fleets to Ephesus, but she insists on being co-commander. He writes to Ahenobarbus in Rome, outlining his demands: complete authority in the East, the right to exact tribute and to appoint client-kings, and especially, ratification of his “donations” to Cleopatra’s children. He sends the letter along with his will. Ahenobarbus is shocked at the contents of the letter and decides not to read it to the Senate, but rather to deliver a speech of his own.

Soon after arriving in Ephesus, Antony leaves for Athens, claiming unfinished business. He has to put in at Samos for repairs and gets drunk at a celebration in his honor. When he sobers up after several days, he realizes he’s getting older. Once in Athens, he demands the troops Octavian was supposed to send him, only to be told that was years ago. He sends a letter to Octavia divorcing her and telling her to leave his house and declaring he won’t support their children.

Ahenobarbus has decided that the only way to make Octavian look illegitimate is to move the government to Ephesus. Since he and the other consul for the year are Antonians, as are many of the Senate, it looks pretty easy. Unfortunately only 300 of the senators decide to come with him. Octavian doesn’t do anything to stop them. Antony is delighted to see them, but Cleopatra isn’t allowed to attend Senate meetings and she’s furious. She doesn’t see that the Romans will never consider her their equal, since she’s just a woman.

Section – 24

Octavian isn’t sorry to see Ahenobarbus and Sosius, the consuls, leave Rome since they’ve been doing whatever they can to obstruct him. Once they’re gone he can appoint suffect consuls to replace them. He needs to raise taxes a lot to pay the legions in the upcoming war against Antony. Octavian decides he needs Antony’s will to turn the people against him and not mind about the taxes. He gets Livia to visit the Vestals and find out where the will is kept. The next day, he has some of his German bodyguards go with him to the Domus Publica and seizes the will. He convinces the Senate that Antony is a traitor because of what’s in the will; people are no longer against the taxes if they will result in Cleopatra’s defeat. He also has everyone swear an oath to himself, voluntarily, with no penalty for not doing it. Nearly everyone does.

Section – 25

Antony is devastated when he learns that Octavian has read his will and had him declared a traitor. He settles his troops in western Greece at Actium, on the large Bay of Ambracia, but most of his supplies are on the other side of Greece. He figured he’d have more time to prepare but the weather is uncharacteristically favorable to Octavian’s crossing from Italy. Agrippa is victorious over Antony’s fleets not near Actium, and he has charge of a good part of the seas. Antony tries to cut off Octavian’s supply of water in the camp across the bay from Actium, but fails. Antony decides he must make his stand in Egypt. They will load as many soldiers as possible in their fastest ships and sail away while other ships are fighting Agrippa’s. Antony will leave his ship in a fast pinnace once he sees they are on their way. There are already some legions in North Africa which will join them in Egypt.

Section – 26

It all goes as Antony and Cleopatra have planned; very few of their ships engaged with Agrippa’s. Octavian and Agrippa think the rest are planning a battle for the next day, but they learn the truth from Poplicola, one of Antony’s generals. Octavian has worked out a story for publication about what happened at Actium, making Antony look like a love-sick fool. The North African legions surrender to Octavian’s legates, never having intended to march hundreds of miles across the coast to Egypt.


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Antony and Cleopatra (other topics)

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