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Film Noir > Foreign Titles

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message 1: by Still (last edited Nov 25, 2013 06:25PM) (new)

Still (mantan) | 425 comments Bullhead (2011)
"Rundskop" (original title)



Spent the afternoon watching this 130 minute noir that was actually nominated for an Academy Award (lost of course) from 2011.

Directed and written by Michaël R. Roskam this features a truly stellar performance by Matthias Schoenaerts as a steroids popping farmer.

Loosely based on the the Belgium "hormone mafia" scandal
http://www.europeanvoice.com/article/...)

I only bring this up because it is so well written and acted.

Searing film.
It's available on Netflix if you have have it.


For more check the "external reviews" at:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1821593/?...


message 2: by Toby (new)

Toby (tfitoby) | 510 comments I've heard good things about Bullhead too, but at 130 minutes I thought better of starting it. I'm very much a lengthist.

But this is a good thread starter indeed.

A foreign noir won an Oscar relatively recently, I'm sure it's been mentioned before on this forum too, The Secret In Their Eyes.

Other notable modern noirs from non-English speaking countries that I'd recommend include Blind Shaft andpolice, Adjective (more of a procedural).

Then of course you can't really go wrong with any Jean-Pierre Melville and there were some pretty great noirs from Akira Kurosawa.


message 3: by Still (new)

Still (mantan) | 425 comments Among the Chrstmas "want list" items that my wife requested were STRAY DOG, DRUNKEN ANGEL, HIGH AND LOW along with a box set entitled Series 17: Nikkatsu Noir (The Criterion Collection) (2009) -
Koreyoshi Kurahara (Director), Seijun Suzuki (Director), Toshio Masuda (Director), Takumi Furukawa (Director), Takashi Nomura (Director)
:

http://www.amazon.com/Eclipse-Series-....

Since we're both fans of noir (home-grown as well as French & Japanese & Italian) I obliged.
As if I had a choice.

We need to have a discussion about favorite Jean-Pierre Melville noirs. The man was a genius!
I'm at my mother & father in-laws for my own favorite, guilt-free holidays in the U.S.: Thanksgiving.
It kills me trying to respond to posts on my I-Pad


message 4: by Toby (new)

Toby (tfitoby) | 510 comments As good as his filmography is nothing compares to Le Samourai, but then few films can compare to Le Samourai from the entire history of cinema.

Those Kurosawa noirs are pretty great and have been copied almost constantly by western filmmakers ever since.

I can't believe I forgot about Seijun Suzuki! Tokyo Drifter was especially impressive for me. That Nikkatsu boxset sounds impressive. Those directors are very highly thought of if only for one standout film. I hope Santa thinks you've been a good boy this year!


message 5: by Algernon (Darth Anyan), Hard-Boiled (last edited Nov 27, 2013 10:11PM) (new)

Algernon (Darth Anyan) | 539 comments Mod
Samourai was great, but my favorite French noirs are
- Du Rififi Chez Les Hommes (American director though, Jules Dassin)
- Tirez sur le pianiste (Francois Truffaut)
- A bout de souffle (Jean-Luc Goddard)
- La mariee etait en noir (Francois Truffaut)
- Quai des brumes (Marcel Carne)
- Pepe le moko (Julien Duvivier)
- Ascenseur pour l'echafaud (Louis Malle, score by Miles Davis)


message 6: by Toby (new)

Toby (tfitoby) | 510 comments Interesting picks Algernon, Carne and Duvivier's films whilst being excellent examples of poetic realism always felt like proto-noir to me.

Truffaut's adaptations of American crime fiction are all incredibly interesting movies, good call.

I think I heard that Rififi was supposed to be a Melville film initially. Although for me I wouldn't say much more about it than check out the heist scene. Even then Melville does it better in Cercle Rouge.


message 7: by Jay (new)

Jay Gertzman | 262 comments Try the Japanese director Keisuke Kinoshita. Try "Woman." A dancer in a revue spends the day with her boyfriend, a gangster. It's early on in the American occupation, which broods over her day off. The beginning and the end are the same scene, showing girls dancing to a vapid and cliched tune about love. The woman learns that her boyfriend is a violent thief. He loves and needs her, however, and what she does to get rid of him is very noir, as is her return to doing what every good American girl would love to do.


message 8: by Mohammed (last edited Nov 28, 2013 09:46AM) (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) Awesome thread since my fav later period film noirs are done by directors like Jean-Pierre Melville, other directors outside USA.

My fav foreign film noirs so far are:

Le Samourai(Melvile)
Stray Dog (Kurosawa)
Rififi (Dassin)
Get Carter (original Caine one)
In Bruges
Brighton Rock (2010)
Animal Kingdom (2010 aussie film)


message 9: by Still (new)

Still (mantan) | 425 comments Wow -some great "fave lists" posted!
Thanks guys.
I have most of these (Criterion, almost all, I think).

Don't have the Malle title Algernon referenced.
IN BRUGES was terrific. It's available on Netflix for those here who subscribe.

My favorite Melville might well be Le Cercle Rouge. Also love Le Doulos. Le Samourai and especially Le Deuxieme Souffle.

I'm a stone Jean Gabin fan. He's like a combo Bogart/Mitchum. I really love all of the noirs in which he stars but Pepe Le Moko is a long time favorite.

I have to be home in order to reference the titles in my DVD library.
Recently acquired a dubious South Korean import DVD of Melodie En Sous-Sol (Any Number Can Win) directed by Henri Veneull and starring Jean Gabin and Alain Delon.
More of a crime caper than an actual noir, we had a good time with it.

Don't speak a word of French but the subtitled translations were very good -very hardboiled. And funny in places.
The DVD appeared to have been bootlegged from a previously issued VHS copy of the film.
Got it as a gift from my sister-in-law and she swears it came from Amazon.

What's Amazon doing selling S. Korean boots?


message 10: by Diane (new)

Diane | 41 comments Mantan wrote: "Among the Chrstmas "want list" items that my wife requested were STRAY DOG, DRUNKEN ANGEL, HIGH AND LOW along with a box set entitled Series 17: Nikkatsu Noir (The Criterion Collection) (2009) -
..."


Those three titles you mentioned are super Mantan.
"Stray Dog" my husband thought terrific - I don't
think he had ever watched a subtitled film before.
My favourite is definitely "High and Low" about a
kidnapping of a child - the way Kurosawa frames
the shots in doorways, rooms etc is extraordinary.
A couple of years ago we had an opportunity to
buy some of his films and we went bananas. Even a
film like "Scandal" (1950) about the pressures of
celebrity had us intrigued and Kurosawa's stock
company of actors means that everyone is going to
be just perfect in their roles.


message 11: by Diane (new)

Diane | 41 comments Tfitoby wrote: "I've heard good things about Bullhead too, but at 130 minutes I thought better of starting it. I'm very much a lengthist.

But this is a good thread starter indeed.

A foreign noir won an Oscar re..."

You know I'm used to very old films where a long,
long movie is one of about 90 minutes, but Kurowsawa's
are long but I guarantee you will not be looking at
your watch. "I Live in Fear" (1955) is very topical,
about an elderly gentleman who is convinced everyone
is going to die through nuclear fallout. The rest
of the family is convinced he is going crazy and
try to have him certified. It is a long movie and it
starts out right in the middle of the conflict in an
official's office but we were so caught up in the
harrowing story, the film just speeded along.


message 12: by Diane (new)

Diane | 41 comments Two foreign noirs that I can't see as being
mentioned that I really like are "La Diabolique"
(1955) about the sinister goings on between a
trio of teachers - edge of your seat stuff!!
And "Elevator to the Gallows" (1958) - sort of
a French "Double Indemnity" - just terrific.


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian Truman (iantruman) | 6 comments I've been impressed by a few good Korean films these last years (thanks to Fantasia Festival)

thinks like Koma or The coast guard,
but also Old boy (god forbit that remake!!! I haven't seen it, and I believe there's no way it can be as good as the original, not to me anyways)
and the two first movies in that trilogy (lady vengeance and No sympathy for mr. vengeance)

Japan still has the most titles in great movies if you ask me, but Korea's definitely getting there...

take care,

ian


message 14: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) The best korean noir director is Kim Jae-Woon because of this film:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0456912/?...

A Bittersweet Life (2005), more noirish than Oldboy.

South Korea is the best current asian film country to me. Their dramas,war films,thrillers since 2000 has surprassed Japan, China/Hong Kong years ago.

Thanks to US version of Netflix i have seen many great korean films in recent years.


message 15: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) Mantan wrote: "Among the Chrstmas "want list" items that my wife requested were STRAY DOG, DRUNKEN ANGEL, HIGH AND LOW along with a box set entitled Series 17: Nikkatsu Noir (The Criterion Collection) (2009) -
..."


Series 17: Nikkatsu Noir (The Criterion Collection) (2009) -
Koreyoshi Kurahara (Director), Seijun Suzuki (Director), Toshio Masuda (Director), Takumi Furukawa (Director), Takashi Nomura (Director):


That collection makes me go oh God i wish we celebrated christmas just to ask for gift like that :)


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Truman (iantruman) | 6 comments Mohammed wrote: "The best korean noir director is Kim Jae-Woon because of this film:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0456912/?...

A Bittersweet Life (2005), more noirish than Oldboy.

South Korea is the best..."


see, not I got to watch it!


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