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what does Daisy mean when she says that she hopes her daughter will be a pretty little fool

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Monica Shoshanna what does Daisy mean when she says this? it's something i don't quite get. wouldn't she want her daughter to be smart and able to make good decisions and not be like her?


Geoffrey She`s being ironic.


Monty J Heying Monica wrote: "what does Daisy mean when she says this? it's something i don't quite get. wouldn't she want her daughter to be smart and able to make good decisions and not be like her?"

It could be an allusion to Daisy's own life, in effect admitting that she's been "a fool" to marry for his money Tom Buchanan, a man who has had serial affairs and otherwise treats her poorly.

It suggests that beauty is an essential strength a woman can use to barter for a desirable (i.e., resourceful or wealthy) mate.


Brianna Monica wrote: "what does Daisy mean when she says this? it's something i don't quite get. wouldn't she want her daughter to be smart and able to make good decisions and not be like her?"
What Daisy means when she says this is that she hopes her daughter will be oblivious to the guys around her and not get hurt like Daisy did.
In this Daisy is Talking about Tom and how he was cheating on her!!!!


Emmy Brianna wrote: What Daisy means when she says this is that she hopes her daughter will be oblivious to the guys around her and not get hurt like Daisy did.i"

Exactly what I was going to say!


Katherine It means she hopes she'll never come up against anything that would require her to wise up and not be a fool.


hodges She thinks the only result of intelligence and experience is sadness.


Mark I think she's reiterating the idea that ignorance is bliss. The world Daisy is living in--which I beleive she sees for what it is--is careless, empty, lonely, etc., and she hopes that her daughter is not capable of being aware of those parts of it as she is. Daisy's conflicted about her role in that world, but she still lives with/and is a part of its principles and values, including the state of her marriage. If she wasn't aware of it all, how happier she would be.


Marci I think she's relenting how awful the world is. She can see that, even if she pretends she doesn't. Love, from her experience, is just a fool's dellusion. Everything inevitably falls apart, and the only way to cope is to be numb to it. The liquor helps, but it inevitably wears off.

She can't change her daughter's future, but she can hope her daughter will never realize how awful the world she lives in is.

Give her looks to get her by and give her ignorance so that she never knows how little she is worth.


Silverpiper katie wrote: "It means she hopes she'll never come up against anything that would require her to wise up and not be a fool."

Marci wrote: "I think she's relenting how awful the world is. She can see that, even if she pretends she doesn't. Love, from her experience, is just a fool's dellusion. Everything inevitably falls apart, and ..."
I think you are right Katie.


message 11: by Georgia (new) - added it

Georgia Mae Healy i think she is wishing that upon her daughter so her daughter doesnt have to live through the pian she has, if her daughter is a fool and pretty then she will be able to marry into money but never really be able to comprehend how strict the rules in her life have been because she doesnt know any different and unable to realise that she is being used.


Scarlett There is a saying 'Ignorance is Bliss' and I feel she hopes her daughter will not have to realize all the issues in society. I also think Daisy realizes it is easier to be a woman when you beautiful and unintelgiant. Smart women intimidates people because it breaks gender roles, and I think she is hopping her daughter can grow up and marry, have kids, be wealthy, and live what must may think is the American Dream. When a woman is inteligant the whole concept of the American Dream and Happily Ever AFter is put into question.


Geoffrey I have always taken it that she will be an attractive woman that will marry well, but be sufficiently naive not to realize he´s a philanderer.


Mariyam Scarlett wrote: "There is a saying 'Ignorance is Bliss' and I feel she hopes her daughter will not have to realize all the issues in society. I also think Daisy realizes it is easier to be a woman when you beautifu..."

^True. In those days, a beautiful, frivolous and unintelligent woman made the perfect adjunct to her husband. But Daisy wasn't born a fool, she chose to be one. Daisy she wanted her daughter to be a natural fool so that she would be both financially secure and happy.


message 15: by Renae (last edited Jan 02, 2014 11:55AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Renae Richardson Maybe her consciousness of what comfort is relative to love is what has put her (Daisy)in the entire predicament. She has let her head rule her heart.

Perhaps she wants her daughter to be pretty enough to attract the finest of suitors, those who will idolize her, and give her the best. Yet, at the same time she wishes that her daughter would not be so much about convention, letting her head rule her heart; and thus be a prisoner to conventions. Rather her daughter be frivolous and a fool when it comes to such matters as love. Where her daughter will choose love over the convention of what is deemed right.


Renae Richardson Hodges wrote: "She thinks the only result of intelligence and experience is sadness."

I agree. Sometimes the more you know the less happy you are. Knowledge comes with a price. There are many a happy fool.


Patti This was actually taken from Zelda, who said it when Scotty was born.


Jenna Daisy wants her daughter to remain oblivious to the "trials and tribulations" that come with knowledge. She believes that if her daughter can just remain silly and vapid, she will always be happy because she'll basically never truly know what's going on. Daisy's knowledge of "true love" (Gatsby) and Tom's infidelity have taken her happiness.


message 19: by Anna (new) - rated it 4 stars

Anna She hopes that her daughter will remain forever innocent and not be changed by the harshness of the world.


Kayla Brown She knows that a pretty naïve girl will feel less pain and loss then a smart woman.


message 21: by Iris (new) - rated it 3 stars

Iris A pretty little fool: Meaning she wants her daughter to be frivolous, charming and dainty. She doesn't want her to be a strong independent woman because life is always hard for those girls. She wants her daughter to coast through life by hypnotizing men and not thinking too much about anything.

It's an understandable desire for her to want that for her daughter.


message 22: by Cheryl (last edited Jan 18, 2014 12:42PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Cheryl Hudson Daisy is flaunting a calculated cynicism about the world because it is a fashionable pose to adopt among her social circle. Part of the cynicism is directed at the new independence and political power of women in the 1920s. Fitzgerald is highlighting a mood among upper class women who disdain greater freedom and political rights because they believe it demonstrates too much vulgar optimism about the future.


Flávia Marques If she's a fool, she'll not realize how empty and meaningless a live like Daisy's can be, and will not suffer for knowing that.


message 24: by Rebecca (last edited Jan 13, 2014 01:30PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Rebecca There is a part in This Side of Paradise (Or was it The Great Gatsby?) where he meets a female friend of his at night in a field, and I think it explains really well and sums up nicely how impossible and hopeless the situation of any woman with half a brain at that time was.

You were not allowed to have your own dreams, at least not in their social class, you had to find a man while you were still young and give your whole life up to him. Only a fool could live a happy life in that kind of situation. Only a fool could not feel the emptiness of it.


Emily Women's soul gets less distorted in the real world than men did, though women is forced to live by the expectation of men with part of their soul flying away from them .


Elizabeth Geoffrey wrote: "She`s being ironic."

no, she's not being Ironic! she wants her daughter to be a pretty little fool so that she doesn't have to deal with real problems.


Geoffrey Or perhaps that she will attract the men but once landing one on a permanent basis will never learn about his extramaritals. I like that explanation better.


Kayla If anyone can tell, Daisy is a very intelligent woman. She knows Tom is cheating on her; she knows how 'life for a woman during the Jazz Age' works. She feels that being that "educated" is more harmful than helpful for a woman because there is nothing they can do with that education instead let it wallow inside of them (women's rights was little to nothing back then). So, what she's saying is that she wants her daughter to just be beautiful and innocent; to have fun like everyone else during the 20s. She doesn't want her daughter to be smart and miserable like she is.


Natalia What I noticed at least, she does is ironic about his life, which she's not completely happy, even though he likes the luxury and good style wearing. Some live in ignorance is better to know everything and many know that Daisy is good to forget things just to pretend that all is well.


Stenedria We recently talked about this book in my English class. We finished the book and the movie. Daisy meant by hoping her daughter will be a fool is to keep her from getting hurt by pretending to not know what's going on.


Natalia Stenedria wrote: "We recently talked about this book in my English class. We finished the book and the movie. Daisy meant by hoping her daughter will be a fool is to keep her from getting hurt by pretending to not k..."

I know. Although the way she says it's not nice.


Stenedria Natàilia wrote: "Stenedria wrote: "We recently talked about this book in my English class. We finished the book and the movie. Daisy meant by hoping her daughter will be a fool is to keep her from getting hurt by p..."

I agree.


Natalia Stenedria wrote: "Natàilia wrote: "Stenedria wrote: "We recently talked about this book in my English class. We finished the book and the movie. Daisy meant by hoping her daughter will be a fool is to keep her from ..."

Because if we look closely, both in the book, like in the movies, Daisy has made her mistakes for no reason, no one forced her to marry Tom Buchanan and leave Gatsby or let him blame for the death of Myrtle.


Geoffrey Yup, this tale is the story of a bunch of fuckups. She can´t wait, gets married to the wrong guy for the wrong reasons, the hero only writes one letter in 6 months which arrives when she is about to get married, she inadvertedly kills her husband´s lover in a hit and run driving accident, the victim´s husband mistakenly murders the wrong guy, and on and on it goes.


Natalia Geoffrey wrote: "Yup, this tale is the story of a bunch of fuckups. She can´t wait, gets married to the wrong guy for the wrong reasons, the hero only writes one letter in 6 months which arrives when she is about t..."

In other words, she run away.


message 36: by Mkfs (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mkfs Geoffrey wrote: "Yup, this tale is the story of a bunch of fuckups..."

What's scary is how accurate that summary of the novel is.


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