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Archived Group Reads 2013 > Can You Forgive Her? Chapters LXXVI - the end

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Marialyce (absltmom, yaya) To discuss these chapters


message 2: by Lily (last edited Nov 25, 2013 01:10PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments .
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Chapter 76. The Landlord's Bill
Chapter 77. The Travellers return Home
Chapter 78. Mr. Cheesacre's Fate
Chapter 79. Diamonds are Diamonds
Chapter 80. The Story is finished within the Halls of the Duke of Omnium


message 3: by Denise (new)

Denise (drbetteridge) | 19 comments Done! I was holding my breath to the very last few pages, just wondering. :) I was kind of pushed into reading this one, but I'll definitely be reading the rest of the series. I like Trollope's style.


message 4: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments Denise wrote: "...I was kind of pushed into reading this one, but I'll definitely be reading the rest of the series...."

May I ask by whom? (I.e., you needed answer.)

Glad that you now consider Trollope worthy of further reading. I have put at least one on my 2014 list of desired readings.


message 5: by Denise (new)

Denise (drbetteridge) | 19 comments A friend's mother, who is well into her 80's. I guess Trollope used to be more popular. I think I will try to read the entire Palliser series next year, although I just read that the series overlaps with the Barsetshire series. I imagine it would be maddening to try to figure out how to read them in some sensible order.


message 6: by Lily (last edited Dec 23, 2013 08:59PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments Denise wrote: "...I imagine it would be maddening to try to figure out how to read them in some sensible order. ..."

If there is one, someone has probably already done that work. (We had a lot of discussion on another board about what that meant for Zola's work -- and found where his view was expressed.) Unlike Zola, my impression for Trollope has been readable pretty much in order of publication, but I didn't realize the two series are considered to overlap. I thought they could be treated independently. Advanced search of the .edu domain might turn up some scholarly opinions.


message 7: by Trudy (new)

Trudy Brasure | 93 comments This was definitely a different story than what I first expected. I thought that Alice really did find Grey a bore and that there was a common bond of spirit between her and George.
Lady Glencora is a hoot. She's adds an attitude of withering bluntness that undercuts all the snobbery and finery of her status. She is normal under all that wearisome privilege!
I don't really love the main theme of this novel. I get the message that a girl should not try to exert her will to any extensive intent, especially in regard to her lifelong match.
Or am I being a little too drastic? What is Trollope trying to say?


message 8: by Lily (last edited Jan 01, 2014 07:18PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments Trudy wrote: "...I don't really love the main theme of this novel. I get the message that a girl should not try to exert her will to any extensive intent, especially in regard to her lifelong match. Or am I being a little too drastic? What is Trollope trying to say? ..."

Trudy -- I guess I didn't go there. I thought Trollope over-all was quite sympathetic of Alice, especially for the time. She had to pull a couple of social doozies, but she did eventually get much of what she wanted in a husband -- a decent man involved in the bigger world. I think Trollope was quite sympathetic of his main characters, even if they were a bit manipulative, whether Mrs. G or Lady G or Alice. Some of the rest, like George, he just sort of shipped off to their self-inflicted fate. I didn't really dig for a theme, more just enjoyed the ride.

But I also appreciated reading your take on the situation!

To some extent, I felt as if Trollope used the story as a set up for introducing the characters for the Pallister series to come. And to make himself some money by creating a fair sized series of installments as he complicated and elongated the telling.


message 9: by Trudy (new)

Trudy Brasure | 93 comments Yes, I do see that Trollope was very sympathetic to Kate's dilemmas throughout and that would have been a progressive perspective for the time period.
I can't seem to help comparing Victorian authors for their take on various social themes/messages. I'm on a quest to see if I can find an author I like better or as much as Elizabeth Gaskell. :)


message 10: by Lily (last edited Jan 04, 2014 07:54PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments Trudy wrote: "I'm on a quest to see if I can find an author I like better or as much as Elizabeth Gaskell. :) ..."

Any thoughts on where George Eliot is positioned in that Quest? She doesn't have the warmth and the innate ability to capture kindness I like about Gaskell, but she is probably the more skilled and widely probing writer.


message 11: by Trudy (new)

Trudy Brasure | 93 comments Gaskell's scope is fairly wide, and I enjoy her thought-provoking look into the role of capitalism in society as well as her emphasis on equalizing humanity on all fronts: gender, class, religion, wealth, etc.
I know I personally value heart over intellect, so I find something lacking in the little I've read of Eliot's works. (I tried to read Middlemarch and couldn't continue after chapter ten. I couldn't muster any sympathy for the heroine, who seemed very cold.)
It's exactly the warmth and kindness that I love about Gaskell. Without heart applied to all humanity's trying issues and dilemmas, we won't make much progress as a race.
Hardy is my second favorite so far. He really makes you think about social/moral issues -- and with such beautiful prose.
Trollope was good. I'll read 'The Way We Live Now' as it is sitting on my shelf! :)


message 12: by Lily (last edited Jan 05, 2014 12:21PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments Trudy wrote: "...I'll read 'The Way We Live Now' as it is sitting on my shelf!..."

I loved every bit of that I read. Some of the characters were such fun to observe. It was one of those times that I had too many books open at the same time, however, so I only skimmed the latter part of it. Although I consider that I have "read" it, I do hope to return to it some day. But, I may do The Duke's Children first since one of you here has said it deals with relationships with grown children. At this point, that subject interests me.


message 13: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (tnorbraten) | 107 comments Lily wrote: "But, I may do The Duke's Children first ..."
I loved The Duke's Children. I read it without this Can You Forgive Her background. It's just a great book.


message 14: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1290 comments Teresa wrote: "I loved The Duke's Children. I read it without this Can You Forgive Her background. It's just a great book."

Thanks, Teresa! I didn't remember who had recommended it and didn't take the time to go back and look. :-(


message 15: by Quan (new)

Quan | 1 comments I truly enjoyed the book. My first Trollope novel and will read his other novels. I love how he engages the reader into the story. Thank you for making it this month's read.


message 16: by Denise (new)

Denise (drbetteridge) | 19 comments I agree. I really enjoyed it. I can't wait to get stuck in to his next one.


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