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Archived Group Reads 2013 > Can You Forgive Her? Chapters XXVII - XXXIII

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Marialyce (absltmom, yaya) To discuss these chapters


message 2: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1289 comments .
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Chapter 27. The Priory Ruins
Chapter 28. Alice leaves the Priory
Chapter 29. Burgo Fitzgerald
Chapter 30. Containing a Love-letter
Chapter 31. Among the Fells
Chapter 32. Containing an Answer to the Love-letter
Chapter 33. Monkshade


message 3: by Lily (last edited Nov 26, 2013 05:48PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1289 comments Chapter 27. The Priory Ruins

Which of the following images comes closest to your sense of where Alice and Glencora walked in the moonlight that cold night as Mr. Jeffrey Pallister waited for and then joined them?

https://www.google.com/search?q=Paint...

For a linkage to the Romantic period and William Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey (1798), see here:
http://www.wwnorton.com/college/engli...
http://www.rc.umd.edu/rchs/reader/tab... -- poem itself, with its mixture of politics, nature and...
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/... -- enlarge the painting to fully enjoy

Our novel here was published in 1865.


message 4: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (tnorbraten) | 107 comments With all the will in the world, I am losing interest I this book. I'm a pretty good Victorian reader, too. I think Alice's wishy-washiness is getting to me.


message 5: by Lily (last edited Jan 13, 2014 07:44AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 1289 comments Teresa wrote: "With all the will in the world, I am losing interest I this book. I'm a pretty good Victorian reader, too. I think Alice's wishy-washiness is getting to me."

I'm sorry to hear you are losing interest, Teresa. I read quickly, like what I call a "good read," and found it fun. I don't remember if there is a shift in pace, but the side bent on Burgo Fitzgerald probably was one of the slower spots for me -- Trollope seemed to be adding to the number of installments he could sell. But in the end, the contrasts between characters and some of their eventual supporting each other held me to the end. I didn't think of Alice as wishy-washy, but as wanting more than she could get in a single package and largely inhibited by the age in which she lived in finding fulfillment independently, rather than through a man (or men). She must face some of her insecurities and vulnerabilities in the process. The parallel Glencora story came to feel like setting the stage for the novels to follow, whereas Mrs. Greenacre provides an amusing and contrasting subplot on what the savvy, and wealthy, woman might do.


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