Favorite Fictional Holidays discussion

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What's your favorite fictional holiday?

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message 1: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (gailzmartin) | 4 comments Mod
Is there a holiday you've read (or written) about in a book, TV or movie that you wish you celebrated? What is it? What appealed to you? Did you ever try to celebrate it?


message 2: by L (new)

L {These two "holidays" may come as no suprise}

Hobbit Day and Tolkien Week

Tolkien Week

Tolkien Week is observed as the calendar week containing September 22, which is always observed as Hobbit Day.
Both celebrations began in 1978. Hobbit Day in particular, and Tolkien Week as well, have gained some measure of legal dignity through a variety of proclamations, declarations, tributes and similar governmental documents prepared by elected officials who support the Society, its goals and the observance of these holidays. Both events have attracted bipartisan support, from the county courthouse to the White House and U.S. Capitol!

Tolkien Week honors J.R.R. Tolkien and his son and editor, Christopher J.R. Tolkien, and celebrates the Middle-earth cycle: The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings (The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King), Unfinished Tales, and The History of Middle-earth.

The most popular method of observing Tolkien Week is the library, bookstore or school display. Most libraries have bulletin boards or cases, and some have enclosed display tables and other facilities up to and including display windows of considerable size. Many librarians among our members and friends create displays; other members contact their libraries and assist in preparing displays.

Hobbit Day

Hobbit Day, on the other hand, is scheduled to fall on Bilbo's and Frodo's mutual birthday, the date of the Long Awaited Party (translated in text by Tolkien as September 22). This is perhaps the oldest festal observance associated with Tolkien fandom. Celebration actually predates the formal designation of the holiday. A variety of names have been applied to the date and the celebrations.

In large part, Hobbit Day is usually taken up with the fun activities - the feasts, games, costume events, fireworks and the like. Hobbit Day is a virtually ideal holiday, incorporating attractive elements of several others: the masquerade fun of Halloween, the feast of Thanksgiving, the exchange of greeting cards and gifts associated with Christmas and birthdays, the fireworks of Guy Fawkes Day... and the study and reflection associated with many commemorative days throughout the year.


message 3: by L (last edited Nov 25, 2013 07:10AM) (new)

L what apealed to me ~ just having fun {and an excuse!} to celebrate my favorite author and his wonderful creation.

Have i ever celebrated either? Yes, i do celebrate Hobbit day and Bilbo Baggins birthday by planning my own party! I have banners and cake and lots of yummy food :)


message 4: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (gailzmartin) | 4 comments Mod
That is so cool! Lucinda, you never cease to amaze me! :)


message 5: by L (last edited Nov 26, 2013 12:12AM) (new)

L Gail wrote: "That is so cool! Lucinda, you never cease to amaze me! :)"

You didn't think i would miss Bilbo Baggins birthday?! :)


message 6: by Pauline (new)

Pauline | 2 comments When I was in the Columbia University Science Fiction Society, we started a tradition of celebrating Bilbo & Frodo's birthday with a party & riddles. We also sometimes did public Tolkien readings to honor the Fall of the Ring Day, March 25.


message 7: by Pauline (new)

Pauline | 2 comments But so far we're just talking about holidays about fiction. I thought the topic would be holidays *in* fiction--like the Feast of Respiratory Masks in Kage Baker's _Anvil of the World_.


message 8: by Gail (new)

Gail Martin (gailzmartin) | 4 comments Mod
Pauline wrote: "But so far we're just talking about holidays about fiction. I thought the topic would be holidays *in* fiction--like the Feast of Respiratory Masks in Kage Baker's _Anvil of the World_."

OK, let's do that!


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