Mrs. Jernigan's AP Class discussion

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Sunday, November 24

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message 1: by Annie (new)

Annie Carpenter From the very start of the novel, it is evident that Hazel is cynical and desperate for answers. Is it significant that he is looking for answers in a town with a blind preacher and his unwelcome companion? Is he looking for answers in starting the Church of Truth Without Jesus? What do you think he will experience/learn from starting this church and what do you think he will learn from Enoch?


message 2: by Annie (new)

Annie Carpenter So far Mrs. Leora Watts is introduced as the "friendliest bed in town." What role do you think Mrs. Watts will play in the novel, if any?


message 3: by Megan (new)

Megan Roach Annie wrote: "From the very start of the novel, it is evident that Hazel is cynical and desperate for answers. Is it significant that he is looking for answers in a town with a blind preacher and his unwelcome c..."
I think that it is example of how Hazel is leading his life now, being out of the war. He came out of the war completely blurry in his faith, but never put his mothers glasses on in order to see again. I think that even shows how he is forgetting the good (his mother) that he had within him before he entered the war and became corrupted. Now, a lost man is being led by a blind man. So far, I don't think he is searching for answers in the Church of Truth, but he is looking for flaws to correct or dislike. I don't think he would put his life, fears and all, into the hands of a blind man. However, like most stories, i feel like Enoch will pull the good out of Hazel like a loyal companion would. He is going to lead Hazel into knowing his old self again, and spur on his past life of being a preacher. Similar to this, the church is going to show him his morals and how he should be acting again. Enoch and the church are going to serve as guides, even though there will be hardships in between, to build Hazel up.


message 4: by Maria (last edited Dec 02, 2013 06:16AM) (new)

Maria Jernigan (mariajernigan) | 113 comments Mod
The Hebrew translation of Taulkinham is the city of lesser crosses, which is appropriate as Hazel finds himself immersed in a materialistic society of consumers. Unlike the army (a safe haven of sorts), he faces greed, corruption, and depravity like never before. O'Connor relies on heavy animal imagery to communicate the absurdity of the city and its inhabitants who never "look at the sky." Concerned with their own desires and needs, the people of the "modern day Atlanta" lack compassion and spiritual inquiry. Here, Hazel seeks answers and tries to wrestle with his own doubts, trying to outrun his name and his calling. His encounter with the blind preacher (a false prophet) draws him into the mysteries and ambiguities of faith and false belief, which ironically tease out Hazel's own underlying past and religious fears. O'Connor is in her element when she has Hazel acquire Leora's name and address from a bathroom stall - an address he seeks just to test and break his purity.


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