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Theo's father

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message 1: by Marsha (new)

Marsha I am on my second read and on the first read I thought that Mr Silver had Theo's father killed. But Silver was looking for Larry after the time of the accident, I think. Was Larry leaving town?


Debby That was Larry's MO. When the going gets tough, leave. Larry ran out on Theo and his Mom and he was doing the same thing to Xandra. Theo couldn't understand why Xandra was shocked by this knowledge.


Cateline Yeah, I thought it was possible that Mr. Silver had the father killed at first. But then I realized that as you mention, he was doing his "running out on everyone" routine...again. Bleech.


Allison Am I the only one who thinks that Theo turned out a lot like his father, more than his mother?


message 5: by Susan (new) - added it

Susan I wasn't sure if Theo's father was leaving town or committed suicide. I am leaning toward suicide.

Also, Theo was alot like his father but he wanted to be different. The drugs, the criminal activity, trying to "play with the big boys," and in disappointing his mother. He knew he could be different and I think at the end he was trying to be better.


Marguerite Czajka Susan wrote: "I wasn't sure if Theo's father was leaving town or committed suicide. I am leaning toward suicide.

Also, Theo was alot like his father but he wanted to be different. The drugs, the criminal act..."


I also thought it was suicide. It surprised me that it didn't seem to occur to any of the characters.


Lisa Yes, Larry's MO was to run. But I wondered if it was suicide as well.

I felt that Theo was just as criminal but much more deceptive than his father.


Adam Rodgers I was surprised that Theo wasn't upset at his lawyer at all because it was his fault in a way that he died. But then again he never really liked his father much.


Travis Roy I think Theo's father's primary concern was self-preservation...whatever the cost, so I really don't think it was suicide. I don't think there is much more to the situation than meets the eye - he was freaked out, got loaded, made the decision to make a run for it and ended up accidentally taking himself out.


Cateline Travis wrote: "I think Theo's father's primary concern was self-preservation...whatever the cost, so I really don't think it was suicide. I don't think there is much more to the situation than meets the eye - he ..."

Yup, history repeating itself. :(


Marcy Theo was like most kids who don't want to end up like their parents; he couldn't help being somewhat like him. But I thought Theo had much more heart and brains than his father.


Cateline Marcy wrote: "Theo was like most kids who don't want to end up like their parents; he couldn't help being somewhat like him. But I thought Theo had much more heart and brains than his father."

I agree, Theo was basically a good kid.

When I said history was repeating itself, I meant the father's history of running away. Whether he deliberately crashed the car or not.


David Streever Allison wrote: "Am I the only one who thinks that Theo turned out a lot like his father, more than his mother?"

I assumed that was a majority opinion; it seems a deliberate thematic element. The one way that Theo does distinguish himself is in staying. He actually doesn't run away, even when he has the chance, which is how he shows that he's not his father. He faces the music.


Cateline David wrote: "Allison wrote: "Am I the only one who thinks that Theo turned out a lot like his father, more than his mother?"

I assumed that was a majority opinion; it seems a deliberate thematic element. The one way that Theo does distinguish himself is in staying. He actually doesn't run away, even when he has the chance, which is how he shows that he's not his father. He faces the music.
"


I like that, and it's very true.


David Streever Cateline wrote: "David wrote: "Allison wrote: "Am I the only one who thinks that Theo turned out a lot like his father, more than his mother?"

I assumed that was a majority opinion; it seems a deliberate thematic ..."


Thank you, Cateline, it is one of the aspects I really loved about this book.

I was a bit distressed by the reviews that said 'no one changed or was redeemed'; to me, that was a central theme in this beautiful book.


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