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Tudor Book Recomendations > The Time Travellers Guide to Elizabethan England

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message 1: by Catherine (last edited Nov 19, 2013 04:00AM) (new)

Catherine Berry I've just finished reading this book and found it extremely interesting. I was surprised at just how tough the Elizabethans actually were. The description about a night out in the local pub ending in a knife fight and murder and the perpetrator even getting away with it!
The cruelty of the "Justice system"; having a hole burnt into your ear lobe by a hot poker just for being homeless.
I was glad to learn that Elizabeth I was an extremely clean monarch, as popular belief has her taking a bath only once a year. This book proves this to be utter nonsense as she had baths installed in every palace (Windsor even had water running out of oyster shells) and portable baths taken with her on progress.
I strongly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in Elizabeth I and Elizabethan life in general. A masterpiece and very well researched.


message 3: by happy (last edited Nov 25, 2013 04:55AM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 106 comments I've also recently finished The Time Travelers Guide and highly recommend it. However, I didn't think it was quite as good as his book on the 14th Century.

I liked the premise of the books. They are really a different take on history with lots of good trivia :)

I know it a little prior to the Tudor era but, I really like his book
1415 Henry V's Year Of Glory by Ian Mortimer

This a day by day look at the year leading up to Agincourt and its aftermath.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments I would agree with that assessment, Happy.

The 1415 book looks very interesting, I'll have to put that on the ever growing to-buy list.


message 5: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry I think I'll have to read his 14th Century Guide, I'm just discovering 14th Century life as I'm currently reading about Richard III so this will be quite interesting.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments Catherine wrote: "I think I'll have to read his 14th Century Guide, I'm just discovering 14th Century life as I'm currently reading about Richard III so this will be quite interesting."

That's a century later - 14th century is the 1300s. Edward II and III, the Black Prince and Richard II.


message 7: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry Ha ha oh yeah I've just read my post again, I'm totally in the wrong century....oops!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments Easy to do.


message 9: by happy (new)

happy (happyone) | 106 comments Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "I would agree with that assessment, Happy.

The 1415 book looks very interesting, I'll have to put that on the ever growing to-buy list."


I think that is a problem everyone on goodreads has :)

Does it ever get any shorter?


message 10: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry Mine grows by the hour and will I read everything on the list? Maybe it's time for some careful editing.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments No, no it doesn't grow any shorter!


message 12: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn Dangerfield | 18 comments Thanks for the recommendation, will add it to my list...


message 13: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry I'm looking forward yo reading the biography of Elizabeth of York by Alison Weir. Has anyone read it yet?


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments I'm reading it now. Quite good, so far (I'm a quarter or more in - it's 1485).


message 15: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry I'm looking forward to reading it. I don't know that much about her other than what I've read in Philippa Gregory novels; it will be interesting to learn about the real Elizabeth of York and was she really planning on marrying her uncle Richard?


message 16: by Dean (new)

Dean Hamilton | 16 comments Catherine wrote: "I've just finished reading this book and found it extremely interesting. I was surprised at just how tough the Elizabethans actually were. The description about a night out in the local pub endin..."

You might enjoy Liza Picard and her book Elizabeth's London: Everyday Life in Elizabethan London. It is somewhat similar to The Time Travelers Guide but focused on London.


message 17: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry Thank you, I'll add that to my reading list.


message 18: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn Dangerfield | 18 comments I've just asked for it as a Christmas present so looking forward to reading it over the holiday!


message 19: by Aly (new)

Aly (Alygator) | 854 comments Catherine, from what I do know about the time, Elizabeth of York and Richard III weren't going to get married. I believe that this was more of the smear campaign against Richard III. There was supposedly a letter (now lost) that showed that Elizabeth was compliant to this marriage. However, she was his niece. She would've been within the degree of consanguinity that would require a dispensation from the Pope to allow them to marry. Even back then an uncle marrying a niece would've raised a couple of eyebrows.


message 20: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry I thought that part a little hard to believe; an uncle marrying his niece? History has been unkind to Richard III and I'm interested in finding out more about him. I've just finished a biography of him and about to start Elizabeth of York which will hopefully throw up some new information.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments It has been known to happen, uncles marrying nieces (not happily, in the case of the Roman emperor Claudius!), but I cannot imagine how difficult it would have been for Richard to get a papal dispensation for it!


message 22: by Anna (new)

Anna Castle (annacastle) Dean wrote: "You might enjoy Liza Picard and her book Elizabeth's London: Everyday Life in Elizabethan London. It is somewhat similar to The Time Travelers Guide but focused on London."

I'll second the recommendation for Picard's book. The scope is comprehensive and the research is scholarly in depth, but her writing is engaging. You feel like you're visiting London with a native.

If you have a big library handy, you might also like the books about Elizabethan England by A.L. Rowse, like Court and Country. These are like sitting in a leather armchair by a fire listening to a old don with a world of knowledge gossip about people he knew. Fun.


message 23: by Lesley (new)

Lesley (lesleykh) | 17 comments This book has proved useful to me while writing about the Tudor period. It's such a readable book that my husband, who is not into this era at all, has picked it up and dipped in on numerous occasions.


message 24: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Kyle This is a marvelous book: accessible, entertaining, and helpful. I consult it often for research. All lovers of the period will enjoy it.


message 25: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry The accompanying TV documentary was very good too. It was presented by Ian Mortimer and good for research also.


message 26: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Kyle Ah, I didn't know it was a TV doc too, Catherine. Wonderful. I heard Ian Mortimer speak on a panel at the Historical Novel Society in London in 2012 and he was as charming as his book. (I spoke on a panel too, one titled "The Fabulous Tudors" with fab fellow authors Margaret George, Christopher Gortner, and Karen Harper. Great company!)


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1911 comments Catherine wrote: "The accompanying TV documentary was very good too. It was presented by Ian Mortimer and good for research also."

I'd like to have seen that.


message 28: by Dean (new)

Dean Hamilton | 16 comments Actually it is up on YouTube. That's where I saw it.


message 29: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Day | 71 comments I actually saw this in my notifications and came to post about the show! I'd been wanting the book and happened upon the series on You Tube while I've been snowed in this week (in northwest Ohio dealing with that Polar Vortex - and it's been WONDERFUL for You Tubed history docs and reading, although I'm sure to gain 10 pounds with all the cooking, too - but I digress... lol)

Anyways, here's the link to the first episode - it's quite enjoyable (but I still need to get my hands on the book!)~

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFNCF...


message 30: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Berry I definitely recommend the TV documentary. It was shown on the BBC last year but if it's on YouTube it's worth the watch.


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