Twilight (The Twilight Saga, #1) Twilight discussion


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Recent Title Trends

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Debbie Hey, is anyone else getting sick of these one word book titles? I mean, it was cool when Crichton did it, but now it's just too cliché. What happened to properly long winded titles? They don't need to be a whole sentence, but more than a syllable would be nice. It sure is going to be difficult to find books in the future unless we memorize which author wrote which "Marked" or "Legend". I mean, just what is wrong with "The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of Jacky Faber, Jewel of the East, Vexation of the West, and Pearl of the South China Sea" for example?! It has clearly been thought over and not just tossed out there to be hurriedly consumed by the masses and forgotten in a moment. Anyway, I think titles need either a more through usage of all the fabulous words out there. I'm not saying that it hasn't been done right, but the book I linked this to, is on of the forerunners of this absurd trend, in my eyes at least. Sure single word titles aren't entirely new, take "Utopia" for example, but there has certainly arisen a definite amount of laziness, esp. amongst teen fiction. I believe some exertion shows not only, a little more love for the book from the author, but also more incentive to read. I find my self turned off by many well regarded books because of this. Though we all know not to judge by a cover I find it is nearly impossible not to do so anymore. Any thoughts? Please feel free to share your ideas regarding this recent trend do you find it good? Easier and more concise something beneficial, or is it something more ... to my thinking?


Debbie Oh yeah, I didn't know where to put this, so.... Sorry Twilight fans! I just wanted to get a good discussion going, and this is a good book for it.


message 3: by Izzy (last edited Nov 18, 2013 01:55AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Izzy Debbie wrote: "Hey, is anyone else getting sick of these one word book titles? I mean, it was cool when Crichton did it, but now it's just too cliché. What happened to properly long winded titles? They don't need..."

I am wary if this is a serious discussion but nobody is going to remember off by heart, "The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of Jacky Faber, Jewel of the East, Vexation of the West, and Pearl of the South China Sea"
That title is long winded, boring and not memorable at all. Perhaps if it had been shortened to, "The Mark of the Golden Dragon" then that would've been better.
If I'm going to be perfectly honest, just looking at that title makes me question what the actual book is like. The title gives me the impression that the writing and the story is just as boring and long-winded as the title. Based on the title and cover alone, I wouldn't give this book the time of day.

People will remember such titles as "Marked", "Twilight", "Lord of the Rings" or "Night World" because they are short, to the point and they catch your eye. Short emotive or descriptive titles seem to be the best to use because it's striking. Even if you glance over a book and manage to just catch the title, you'll still be able to remember it.
It's not laziness but psychology, if you will. It takes very little time for us to judge someone and make our first impression on what that individual is like. It's the same with books and whether we're interested in it or not. If there's a small window of opportunity to make up our minds then it makes sense for authors and publishing houses to choose short, simple titles for their books. Depending on how the books are shelved, the first thing that we will see is either the spine of the book which only has the name of the title and author, or the front cover. If market research shows that consumers prefer short titles then it makes sense to listen to that.


message 4: by Gerd (last edited Nov 18, 2013 04:29AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gerd Actually, the title _is_ "Mark of the Golden Dragon" if you look at the cover, which by the way is beautfifully done and quite memorable IMO.

I was only surprised to find that L.A. Meyer is a man's pen name - don't they say authors prefer to use manly sounding names because apparently those sell easier?

More on-topic:
This one word title trend seems to be a trend that finds more notice in YA series writing, though:
Legend
Ashes
Shiver
...the last parts to Hush, hush


message 5: by Jacquelyn (last edited Nov 18, 2013 04:40AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jacquelyn Sorry, just to be a dick I'm going to point out even Twilight is two syllables. . . .
Yeah, that was unnecessary, sorry just trollin' xD

In all seriousness though, you'd be very surprised at how good those titles can be. And on a positive note, you never forget the titles!


message 6: by Izzy (last edited Nov 18, 2013 04:57AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Izzy Gerd wrote: "Actually, the title _is_ "Mark of the Golden Dragon" if you look at the cover, which by the way is beautfifully done and quite memorable IMO.

I was only surprised to find that L.A. Meyer is a man'..."


No, it's not listed as 'Mark of the Golden Dragon'. The title that I linked to is the title in its entirety. If you enlarge the cover then you can see that the rest of the title is put on the book. It's listed as the title on Amazon, Goodreads and other sites. The entire thing seems to be the title.

EDIT: I've just searched the internet and if I'm understanding correctly then a subtitle on a book is considered to be included as part of the title? So this book would indeed be titled, "The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of Jacky Faber, Jewel of the East, Vexation of the West, and Pearl of the South China Sea"?


message 7: by Gerd (last edited Nov 18, 2013 05:00AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gerd Well, yes, the rest is on the book cover, but I wouldn't consider it as integral to the title, just as we don't talk about: "Frankenstein, or the modern Prometheus" but simply would inquire after "Frankenstein" or "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein" when looking for the book...

Edit:
Not that I would disagree with your musings about the long title of the book, but I think that is exactly what the writer wanted to convey, the idea of old-fashinoned, over wrought writing; a harkening back to days when run on sentences were thought of as fashionable.


Izzy Gerd wrote: "Well, yes, the rest is on the book cover, but I wouldn't consider it as integral to the title, just as we don't talk about: "Frankenstein, or the modern Prometheus" but simply would inquire after "..."

I thought this was because in the more modern editions, the subtitle was removed entirely. It may have had that subtitle in the past but because the subtitle was dropped, it's now simply titled, 'Frankenstein' and that's what people now know it as.

If we were looking for a non-fiction novel or a volume such as Dreamsongs: A Retrospective: Book One or David Jason: My Life then the subtitle would be considered to be part of the title and would be listed as such in reviews, interviews and articles.

I'm sure that readers of the series must shorten these titles when mentioned in conversation because it's a lot easier to say but the books are still listed as having long titles.


Gerd Well, not sure how to treat non-fiction in that regard, however, technically I'd say that the David Johnson book is called "My life", you simply need to add that it's David Johnson's to get the right "My life" book. :D

But if you look at the different editions for "Dreamsongs" you'll find that it's equally just called that - no addendum on the covers.

However, there are works in non-fiction with dreadful long titles no one can possibly recall, but mostly those are academic titles nobody reads anyway.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Yes, getting sick of one-word titles.


message 11: by Debbie (last edited Nov 18, 2013 08:20PM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Debbie "Izzy wrote:People will remember such titles as "Marked", "Twilight", "Lord of the Rings" or "Night World" because they are short, to the point and they catch your eye. Short emotive or descriptive titles seem to be the best to use because it's striking. Even if you glance over a book and manage to just catch the title, you'll still be able to remember it.
It's not laziness but psychology, if you will. ... It's the same with books and whether we're interested in it or not. If there's a small window of opportunity to make up our minds then it makes sense for authors and publishing houses to choose short, simple titles for their books. ... If market research shows that consumers prefer short titles then it makes sense to listen to that. "


While there are many books I feel do qualify as following the research, there are some that could just as well be remembered with a slightly longer title but are stunted because the one word title doesn't quite serve to present the book in as favorable/memorable a light as it could be. Those are the books I'm talking about.
Also I think that eventually things will get just a little confusing unless we broaden out the words used in the one word titles. There are just so many words to pick form but I think the practice will wear a little thin one we have to start looking a mere title up in the dictionary because the author found out that someone else already used their first choice, forcing them to pick something a bit more obscure.

BTW You should read the Bloody Jack series, it's not nearly as long winded and stuffy as it appears. And yes I get that the title is constructed that way on purpose, hearkening back and all. In hindsight, perhaps not the best example, but oh well!


Debbie Jacquelyn wrote: "Sorry, just to be a dick I'm going to point out even Twilight is two syllables. . . .
Yeah, that was unnecessary, sorry just trollin' xD"


Ha ha! Got me! :)


Debbie Gerd wrote: "Actually, the title _is_ "Mark of the Golden Dragon" if you look at the cover, which by the way is beautfifully done and quite memorable IMO."

I quite agree that the covers are well done, hard to find something not digitized these days too. Also, I thought the author was female too, quite suprising.


April I agree with you on the one word titles… They're getting a little cliche in my opinion. I am currently writing a novel and the title is more than one word. It's sort of mysterious sounding if you ask me. The novels coming along well (in case anyone cares) and the one word titles are getting a little cliche and a bit annoying. I mean can people please come up with better titles that are a little longer? It would be nice. But not necessarily a title that gives away what the book is about. That's all I really have to say about this topic.


Debbie April wrote: "I agree with you on the one word titles… They're getting a little cliche in my opinion. I am currently writing a novel... "

CONGRATULATIONS!!! Hope to see it when it is published. :)


Matilda Rose Spot on. One word titles that sound possibly intriguing/romantic, even if it has very, very little relevance to the actual contents of the book, and people are jumping on them, at least in the YA market. It's not exactly a subtle approach. And usually the covers reflect that - the trying to be deep but drastically failing, the wisps of silk dresses, the parted lips, staring into space pose...

Not to say that some of these books don't suit their titles. But man is it massively overdone.

I mean, look at these:
Captivating
Glitter
Silence
Dreamless
Goddess
Fury
Fallen
Rapture
Evermore
Tempted
Revelations

... Kinda sad.


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