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What if George Washington wasn't around to lead the American Revolution?

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message 1: by Chris (new)

Chris LaFata (chrislafata) | 3 comments Hi Alternate History fans,

I've been a member of the group for a while, but haven't really posted.

I wanted to let you know I just released my novel, Washington's Providence. It's available on Amazon and will be up on B&N and the Apple store soon.

Here is the book trailer I produced: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbjqS1...

Book Description:
Former history professor John Curry has been recruited by a time-travel company to scout the best vantage point for clients to witness the inauguration of the first President of the United States. There's just one problem: When he arrives in 1789, there is no inauguration—and no United States. Until this point, the time-travel job has had its perks. Getting relationship advice from the legendary lover, Casanova, was valuable. Accompanying Casanova to the opening night of Mozart's opera, Don Giovanni, was even better.

But being stranded in the British Colony of New York isn't what he signed up for. Few people have even heard of George Washington, and the short-lived American Revolution failed—presumably because Washington wasn't alive to lead it. John always knew history could change on a dime, but not after it already happened. Right?

After learning Washington was killed thirty years earlier during the French and Indian War, John realizes the only way he can return home is to ensure there's a United States to return to. Everything hinges on keeping Washington alive—not the easiest task protecting someone famous for leading battles on the front lines while perched on a horse. While traveling further back through time to protect Washington, he uncovers a secret the Freemasons have kept for more than two and a half centuries and learns that the history he thought he knew was completely wrong.

Autographed copies are available at www.chrislafata.com.

I'm setting up virtual book club meetings as well as in-person ones if you're near Denver, CO.

I'd be happy to have a discussion or answer any questions here as well.

Thanks!


message 2: by Alvin (new)

Alvin (covenant) Looks nice! I was about to bug you about the merits of going paperless, but I see you beat me to the punch by offering an eBook. This might be something to read over the holiday... if I can get through all of the books on "here's how we want you to teach your class this week with an innovative new method" books the district has been shoving at me lately.


Btw, your youtube link got broken and doesn't work...

Here is what (I believe) to be the correct link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbjqS... ..


message 3: by Chris (new)

Chris LaFata (chrislafata) | 3 comments Alvin wrote: "Looks nice! I was about to bug you about the merits of going paperless, but I see you beat me to the punch by offering an eBook. This might be something to read over the holiday... if I can get thr..."

Thanks for fixing the link, Alvin. I have no idea what happened.

I am more of an e-reader too. Since I got an iPad four years ago, I can count on one hand the number of physical books I've read.

What do you teach?


message 4: by Alvin (new)

Alvin (covenant) Chris wrote: What do you teach?

I teach 10th grade ESL in an urban school. Most of my kids are from Honduras or El Salvador, or bad parts of Mexico in equal proportion. So few have had formal schooling. So many of the great ideas about how to teach kids I have to read about are completely off base for my kids who really need more personalized attention and are almost all exceptions to the rules, each and every one. Great kids, but hard lives.


message 5: by Art (new)

Art (artfink02) | 3 comments I'm on a parallel track to yours, I think. I taught elementary (4-7) for 35 years, and for the past ten, I've volunteered as a tutor for a literacy program specializing in older adults who can't read. (One client had less sight words than we have fingers)
Lots of ideas, much trial and error with individuals. Now I've gotten two onto Kobo minis (e-reader) at their own levels.


message 6: by Art (new)

Art (artfink02) | 3 comments Hard lives for people in their 50s & 60s who can't read, too.


message 7: by Chris (new)

Chris LaFata (chrislafata) | 3 comments Art wrote: "Hard lives for people in their 50s & 60s who can't read, too."

That's awesome, Art. I've been teaching online classes for college freshmen for ten years, but those students know how to read (for the most part). :-)


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