Mrs. Jernigan's Class discussion

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message 1: by Maria (new)

Maria Jernigan (mariajernigan) | 143 comments Mod
Join us as we talk about our books.


message 2: by Maria (new)

Maria Jernigan (mariajernigan) | 143 comments Mod
What is happening in your book?


message 3: by William (new)

William Whitaker For my two books, i decided to choose works that possessed at least some symbolic meaning within its text. these two novels that i chose were catching fire and the Life of Pi. In each novel, there happens to be many significant symbolic meanings hidden within its lines.

What are the different symbols in your book and what do they represent?


message 4: by William (new)

William Whitaker To answer my own question, the symbols hidden in Catching Fire are numerous. The first for an example is the Mocking jay pin that Katniss places on her chest. This specific symbol might seem small, but in actuality has a much larger meaning and effect. what most people don't realize is that that little pin happens to represent hope. When the starving and miserable people of the higher districts see Katniss and her pin, it reminds them that there is still good in the world, and that there is a small chance that it might grow into something bigger. Another symbol used in this novel is the color white. In most books white usually means good and black obviously bad. however, unlike most, it is the opposite. We see that the dark colors tend to be worn by the hard working, and respectable citizens of the poor districts while the rich and corrupted citizens of the capitol wear white. To be more specific president snow, not only has the color white almost printed in his name, but also contains white hair which fits his evil heart perfectly.


message 5: by William (new)

William Whitaker The other Novel containing many symbols is the Life of Pi. This novel starts off a little slow with the symbolism, but as Pi recalls his story we see a little plot twist and find out that his boat buddies, the zebra, tiger, hyena, and orangutan all end up representing specific people. What we didn't realize at first was that these animals were just made up to block the bad memory of his past, and as they come out we see a much bigger meaning


message 6: by Walkerh (new)

Walkerh I read the book "The Hunger Games". Within the book there are alot of different symbolic symbols within the story. My favorite is the MockingJay because to Katniss it is a symbol to remind her surveil. It gives her the determination to adapt and to survive. The MockingJay pin she puts on herself when she goes into battle is her only thing to cling to. By her having it she believes that she is safe and that she has the skills to survive. It also is a way to communicate. She uses them to communicate to others to say she is safe without talking face to face with the other person.


message 7: by Walkerh (last edited Dec 12, 2013 08:32PM) (new)

Walkerh Another book that I read was Tony Dungy. He struggles with his physical attributes and his race in making it in the NFL as a coach and a player. In anyones book do their characters go through a journey to overcome obstacles and challenges to achieve his or her goals?


message 8: by Walkerh (new)

Walkerh answering my question, Tony Dungy grew up in a small town where the only way for him to get out or make something of his life was to play football, that is all he knew. He wasn't the most athletic or the best quarterback ever, but he had he determination and the will to make his dream become a reality. He also was the first African American to win a Super Bowl as a coach. Some of the obstacles were the media and the fans that doubted him in his coaching career. He did overcome the obstacles in his life but he didn't do it alone, he had the Father on his team which is the best way to be able to overcome any obstacles. Obstacles are made that much easier when God is with you, and I believe that even though he worked to get his success, God blessed him with the talent of being a good coach. Even though he didn't make it in the NFL as a player he accomplished his goals as a coach.


message 9: by Walkerh (new)

Walkerh In my book Tony Dungy, the book deals with relationships and bonds within family or friends. Does relationships help you strive to your goals, or do they distract and hurt you from achieving what you want to achieve?


message 10: by William (new)

William Whitaker In my novel Life of Pi, the main character Pi, actually does go through a long journey as he walks us through his crazy story. Pi tells us about his boat crash and how he had to survive through the hardest conditions in order to survive. Pi explains how he had to face his fears and create a killer instinct in order to survive. At the end of his journey, he then had to face his past and realize what actually happened throughout his journey.


message 11: by Walkerh (new)

Walkerh To answer my question, I believe that relationships can hurt you and help if you use them in the right ways. For example, Dungy love to have his kids around his work and playing with him when he is coaching. The is an example of a good relationship. He is building a stronger bond with his kids, and it reminds him everyday that he has to provide for what he loves and treat them with love and respect. On the other hand, a relationship that hurts him is the media and the fans that were against him. Sometimes he focused to much on the evil and that maybe he was doing something wrong, or maybe he isn't good enough. He had to learn how to block out the bad in his life and let in the good so he can be the coach he wants to be and the father he wants to be.


message 12: by William (new)

William Whitaker After looking over my previous question, i started to think. what if many of the symbols we discover and talk about were not really meant in that way.

Are there any examples in your book in which there might have been an unintentional symbol


message 13: by William (new)

William Whitaker to answer my own question once again, i do believe that there are some symbols that we find that aren't really intentional. I do believe that the majority of the symbols found are meaningful, but after reading multiple books it seems that a few are not


message 14: by Walkerh (new)

Walkerh I believe that symbols in a book are made to be what the reader wants them to be. If a symbol doesn't have a direct mean and is clear cut, then the reader can determine what they believe the meaning of something is if that is a physical symbol or a metaphorical symbol. The eye of the beholder can associate deferent symbols and apply them to their own life to help them understand the story or even bring them to their own lives.


message 15: by Ruth (new)

Ruth I agree with Walker in saying that symbols differ depending on how the reader takes them. Everyone thinks differently and the initial meaning of the symbol that the author planned might not be seen the same way to the audience. In "Matched" there are artifacts that people can keep, (the only thing they are allowed to have that hasn't been given to them by the government), and I find the symbol to be something around freedom and independence , but Ally a indie (the author) might have a different meaning for them.


message 16: by Walkerh (new)

Walkerh In my book Tony Dungy, he finds help from a ex-football player and now pastor in the book to help him on his journey. Does anyone have a mentor that they look up to, and help them with their goals?


message 17: by Marianna.ward (new)

Marianna.ward Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

In my book, the author and main character Mindy is struggling with finding her place in the male dominated world of comedy screenwriting. Being a minority, she has always been looked down upon and left out throughout her life.

For me it is extremely uplifting that there are women out there who are willing to throw themselves into male dominated fields.


message 18: by Marianna.ward (new)

Marianna.ward Walkerh wrote: "In my book Tony Dungy, the book deals with relationships and bonds within family or friends. Does relationships help you strive to your goals, or do they distract and hurt you from achieving what y..."

I believe that relationships and bonds within families only help people achieve goals. In my book, the main character would not have achieved her goals of writing and acting of it was not for the extremely loyal support of her best friends and parents.

In my life, I know that when I am trying to achieve something big it always helps to know that my family and friends are standing behind me and supporting me.


message 19: by Mac (new)

Mac Keck Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

In my book Red Dragon, detective Will Graham and Jack Crawford track down a violent serial killer named the "Tooth Fairy." The "Tooth Fairy," or Francis Dolarhyde is obsessed with the painting "The Great Red Dragon and The Women Clothed in Sun" by William Blake. Dolarhyde is so obsessed with that he feels by murdering, or "changing" people, he can better become his alternate identity... "The Great Red Dragon." Dolarhyde eventually goes to the museum where the painting is being held and eats it.


message 20: by Mac (new)

Mac Keck Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

Eventually, in Red Dragon, Will Graham discovers that the only way that Dolarhyde could have known the layouts of all of his victims houses is by working for the lab that processes people's home movies. Dolarhyde sees the police interviewing his boss, and fakes his own death by burning his own house with his girlfriend and the body of a gas station worker inside. Dolarhyde then attacks Will Graham and stabs him in the face. Graham's wife then shoots and kills Dolarhyde resolving the book's major conflict. Afterwards, Graham receives a letter from Hannibal Lecter wishing him the best of luck, and hoping that he isn't "too ugly."


message 21: by Houston (new)

Houston Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

Coming Back Stronger by Drew Brees with Chris Fabry portrays Drew's life has a football player growing up. It includes how he got where and most importantly how to come back stronger after injury. Drew always had the passion to play the game sense he was little and he got to play college football at Perdue. After a successful four years in college we winds up getting drafted by the Chargers. In 2005 he dislocated his shoulder and had season ending surgery and gets traded to the Saints. Trying only to worry about getting healthy he now has a new team to prepare for. Football in New Orleans was all about the team until hurricane Katrina hit and then it became about the community. So not only does he come back stronger himself, but he helps a community come back stronger then ever and goes on to win the super bowl.


message 22: by Houston (new)

Houston Walkerh wrote: "In my book Tony Dungy, the book deals with relationships and bonds within family or friends. Does relationships help you strive to your goals, or do they distract and hurt you from achieving what y..."
I believe friends and family do not get in the way, but help you get through tough obstacles. Drew Brees goes through a lot on and off the field and without support of family and friends he would not have came back stronger.
Even in my life, my best friend plays a big role in who I am. We push each other to our limits because if we don't we both know we are not doing each other good. Plus life is not easy and not made for people to live alone, we need family and friends to hold us accountable because life is filled with too much for us to handle.


message 23: by Houston (new)

Houston Walkerh said:"In my book Tony Dungy, he finds help from a ex-football player and now pastor in the book to help him on his journey. Does anyone have a mentor that they look up to, and help them with their goals?"

like I said earlier, I believe mentors and friends are key in life, I personally have a group of guys I feel comfortable around to share my life with and also have a mentor who is our team Chaplin. For me a mentor is a man who is there for you whenever, someone who has paved the way and can guide you so one day you can be the mentor and that is exactly what he is to me. I would encourage for all people to have a group of guys and or mentor they can trust because it helps.


message 24: by Bretthuseman (new)

Bretthuseman Maria wrote: "Join us as we talk about our books."

I read quite a few books. In all of them I am finding many symbols and struggles that the protagonists must conquer. This leads me to believe that every book contains a decent to darkness, much like the book "heart of darkness" that we read in class.


message 25: by Bretthuseman (new)

Bretthuseman Walkerh wrote: "I read the book "The Hunger Games". Within the book there are alot of different symbolic symbols within the story. My favorite is the MockingJay because to Katniss it is a symbol to remind her surv..."

I read the same book as you. The mockingjay becomes a symbol for many things and as the conversation said earlier, things are symbols for whatever you want them to be. To me, I think an argument could be made that the mocking jay is a symbol for Hope or corruption. Everytime she sees it is in a moment of utter corruption. So, her seeing it could mean that the corruption is present or the hope is present. It could be taken either way.

That is what is so awesome about symbols and motifs in books, They can be taken so many different ways.


message 26: by Cole.thompson (new)

Cole.thompson In my two books there are these two brothers that hate each. They both created a company one of them created puma the other one crated adidas. They both started the company during wwII that was really not working for them both.


message 27: by Parker (new)

Parker Howell Well I just finished my last book and it turned out incredibly interesting and exciting. I usually only enjoy books with a lot of action that can keep me entertained enough that i don't fall asleep but this book turned out as a pleasant surprise. The surprising connections made between the events of 800 b.c. and the current conditions of America today come quite shocking and frightening. I strongly recommend this book to anyone in search for a good read and a rude awakening about this country and its fate.


message 28: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Morris Earlier everyone was talking about symbols, and I am reading the Book Thief. One of the main symbols, obviously, are books. I think the books can represent a loss of innocence or the preservation of innocence. The books keep Liesel as a child, but eventually the act of stealing will catch up with her and she will realize the wrong in her actions. I think it can be taken as a good or a bad thing. The fact that Liesel are stealing the books shows the sinful nature in all humans, but I think they also serve the purpose of an escape out of the evil in Nazi Germany all around them.


message 29: by Ruth (last edited Feb 26, 2014 06:34AM) (new)

Ruth Right now Cassia just met up with Xander for the first time in months since her family got relocated to a new providence. It is amazing to see how Xander still loves Cassia so gently and paitently even though she is in love with someone else. I want her to end up with Xander, but also with Ky, so I am interested to see what happens as I read along. I know that she will most likely end up with Ky most authors give the girl to the "under dog." For example, (view spoiler)


message 30: by Ruth (new)

Ruth William wrote: "For my two books, i decided to choose works that possessed at least some symbolic meaning within its text. these two novels that i chose were catching fire and the Life of Pi. In each novel, there ..."

One symbol in my book would be a compass. Cassia received the compass from Ky to help her find him. It not only represents the journey she is on, but keeps her going. She knows that Ky is out there and wants nothing more to find him.
The author of my book has started to make every other chapter about Ky and what he is doing, and they are both looking for each other.


message 31: by Ruth (new)

Ruth Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

Right now both Cassia and Ky are on the search for each other. Cassia happened to be relocated to the same spot Ky was, just a few days later. Ky went down into the Canyons with two other guys. Cassia followed his path into the Canyons with her friend Indie, living on blue nutrient pills and plants for food. Cassia is getting closer and closer to Ky, I just know something is bound to happen before they meet.


message 32: by Andrew (new)

Andrew M "If a story is not about the hearer he will not listen. And I here make a rule -- a great and lasting story is about everyone or it will not last. The strange and foreign is not interesting -- only the deeply and personal and familiar."

Is this true with your story? Is it something "strange and foreign" or is it the same relatable story?


message 33: by Andrew (new)

Andrew M Steinbeck displays the act of deception achieving the wants and needs of man throughout the course of his novel. Though characters such as Cathy and Cal get there way through this tactic, it makes the reader livid.
Is deception a motif in your story? If so, how does the author portray it?


message 34: by William (new)

William Trapnell Andrew,
I thought that that quote was extremely interesting and thought provoking question. I feel that the only way a book/ piece of literature can survive the test of time is if it appeals to everyone's human nature. There is a reason why there are archetypes, and the way that a work will be listened to is if people can relate to the characters no matter how far fetched the plot is.
My book is more of a look into wall street and Michael Lewis' personal experiences, but similar concepts arise. Lewis is able to draw you into his story because he opens up and shows his fears and what it would be like getting into something that is very intimidating.


message 35: by Parker (new)

Parker Howell Andrew wrote: ""If a story is not about the hearer he will not listen. And I here make a rule -- a great and lasting story is about everyone or it will not last. The strange and foreign is not interesting -- only..."

I think my book is somewhat of both. I am reading Lone Survivor and besides the fact that it is war and thousands of miles away, many aspects of the story any reader can relate to. The sense of brotherhood between each of the Seals, in my opinion, anyone can relate to with someone in one's family or close. Even the aspect of fighting for something or someone (on a much smaller scale of course).


message 36: by Tupperjohnson (new)

Tupperjohnson Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

I am reading Thirteen Reason Why, and so far in my book, it is about a girl who committed suicide. She created cassette tapes with 13 reasons of why she killed herself and sent the tapes to the different people that led her to kill herself. In the story, it is a boy who is friends with the girl Hannah, who killed herself, and he is listening the tapes discovery why she killed herself.


message 37: by Matt (new)

Matt Custodero My book "Pete Rose: the American Dilemma" discusses not only Pete Roses' professional and managerial carrer, but also discusses his thought processes and his reasoning for betting on games as the manager of the Philadelphia Phillies. An obvious physical journey correlates with a metaphorical, emotional journey to show the potential corruption that resides in us all.


message 38: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Kate Mac wrote: "Maria wrote: "What is happening in your book?"

In my book Red Dragon, detective Will Graham and Jack Crawford track down a violent serial killer named the "Tooth Fairy." The "Tooth Fairy," or Fran..."


I also read Red Dragon. How do you think the story would have been different if the tooth fairy had grown up in different circumstances? How responsible is his Grama for his actions later in life?


message 39: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Kate In the book The Goldfinch, the main character's view on life was extremely cynical but also somewhat practical. In his eyes, humans rise organically, wade endlessly through a meaningless cesspool of humanity, then return to organic state in death. Nothing more and nothing less. He also claimed that it was our duty to find happiness anyway and to enjoy those things that death cannot touch. I personally find this view a little too radical and maybe somewhat cheating of the goodness life can offer, I do think that people might hold this life a little bit higher than God calls us to. Yes, it has so much to offer and yes its something to be wholly enjoyed, but this is not our final destination. It truly is just a passageway to the lives we were created to live with our savior.


message 40: by Ruth (last edited Apr 03, 2014 09:15PM) (new)

Ruth In my book Crossed, the main character, Cassia, leaves her work camp for a chance to find her love, Ky. When she arrives at a new camp she risks her life again, escaping the camp to run in the same path Ky ran a couple days earlier. Cassia almost died from not eating on her regular meal plan, but finally made it to Ky.

Does a character in your book risk their life, or risk getting consequences for doing something? Also would you or a character in your book ever risk your life for love?


message 41: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Kate Ruth wrote: "In my book Crossed, the main character, Cassia, leaves her work camp for a chance to find her love, Ky. When she arrives at a new camp she risks her life again, escaping the camp to run in the same..."

In my book, the main character also risks his life for love. Plainly, he risks it for a painting, but I think that the painting represents one of the last things that connects him to his mother. There is nothing he has left that is any sort of tie to his old life or the one person that truly loved him except this tiny painting that was present at the death of his mother. In his heart, Theo risks his life to save his mother.


message 42: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Morris Andrew wrote: . Is deception a motif in your story? If so, how does the author portray it?
In the Book Thief, by Markus Zusak, deception is a huge motif portrayed throughout the story. The main character is a thief, she steals from people constantly. I think deception is an important theme to have in a book because it reveals how ignorant and oblivious people can be, it reveals weakness, which is something no one wants to admit they have.


message 43: by William (new)

William Trapnell In my book Lewis is chronicling his journey to Wall Street. He recounts stories of men who only want money. They are brutal and do not care about anyone but themselves. Do you all think that we are blinded by fame and fortune? We focus on material possessions, but ultimately they do not satisfy us. Why then are we so focused on achieving it?


message 44: by William (new)

William Trapnell It was interesting... Lewis ended up getting into the Bond trading side of Solomon Brothers even though he knew that it was not what he loved. He felt like there was more prestige and money in bond trading so he pursued it. He gave up what interested him in order to be seen as successful... this made me think about what success is? How do we measure success. Is it how much money you make? Is it how much you enjoy your job? or is it something different? Has a false sense of success been in any of your books?


message 45: by William (new)

William Trapnell Deception is a motif in my book. The people in the training program for Solomon Brothers were ruthless. They would lie cheat and steal to get a job with the firm. They abandoned all personal convictions because it was a dog eat dog world.


message 46: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Kate I aspect of my book that was very enjoyable but also challenging was the author's extremely descriptive style of writing. On one hand, the detail really allow the reader to connect and get to know the character on a deep level. I sometimes got lost in all of the detail and description of the mundane activities of the character. But these mundane activities are also a window into the characters soul.


message 47: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Kate Another challenge that I encountered in my book The Montromologist was the disconnect between the character's actions and thoughts. I think that was one thing that has caused me to dislike the book at first. The character's "thoughts" were very interesting and mature. His actions were juvenile and dim. I was frustrated with his lack of persona in his actions but very interesting and insightful "thoughts". Maybe it was just a mistake the author made or maybe he was writing it in the eyes of an adult who is adding insight but also reflecting on his actions as a boy.


message 48: by Xander (new)

Xander Isaacs Ruth wrote: "Right now Cassia just met up with Xander for the first time in months since her family got relocated to a new providence. It is amazing to see how Xander still loves Cassia so gently and paitently ..."

Hey I have never even met Cassia! I'm not sure what book you are reading but it sounds like the Mocking Jay book in the Hunger Games series. If it is in the Hunger Games series I think that to have a love story between Xander and Cassia shows the relentlessness and power of love. Despite terrible circumstances pain and suffering all around them they come together and are united by their love.


message 49: by Xander (new)

Xander Isaacs William wrote: "Deception is a motif in my book. The people in the training program for Solomon Brothers were ruthless. They would lie cheat and steal to get a job with the firm. They abandoned all personal convic..."

I was reading william's post considering what I would do if I was trying to provide for my family. Would you abandon morality to keep your job and continue to provide for your family? Is the fact that you work in a competitive work environment aka "a dog eat dog world" justify borderline immorality and personal convictions?


message 50: by Xander (new)

Xander Isaacs Sara wrote that her character had a, "disconnect between the character's actions and thoughts". My Book Think And Grow Rich is about alining thoughts and actions to achieve your goal. Success occurs when someone determines what they want and then does everything possible to achieve that goal even when failure occurs.


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