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Meet the Author > Meet J Tullos Hennig

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message 1: by Dreamspinner (last edited Sep 10, 2013 11:20AM) (new)

Dreamspinner Press (Dreamspinnerpress) | 2637 comments Mod
Meet J Tullos Hennig, author of "Shirewode" this Saturday, September 14 from 3pm CST right here on the Dreamspinner Press Goodreads Page.


message 2: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 04:47PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Hullo and welcome. I'm J Tullos Hennig, author of SHIREWODE and it's prequel, GREENWODE. Anyone willing to bat a few comments back and forth?


message 3: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 14 comments Yeah, how do you get your ideas? *evil grin*

No, kidding, although feel free to answer that for anyone who hasn't actually had a scary glimpse inside your head.

Me, I wanna hear about your worldbuilding process and how your 'Wode world in particular evolved to become almost a lush character all by itself.


message 4: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 01:27PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Just so everyone knows, both the Wode
books are based on historical ballads with a magical/mystical bent. 'My' Robyn adds another arrow to his quiver of social commentary--he's homosexual. As a noted Robin Hood scholar said, "It's past time for a gay Robin Hood", and I heartily agree. :)


message 5: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Carole wrote: "Yeah, how do you get your ideas? *evil grin*

No, kidding, although feel free to answer that for anyone who hasn't actually had a scary glimpse inside your head.

Me, I wanna hear about your wo..."


Hm... so you just had to start off with the complex ones, eh?

You know, often it's the characters who inform the world for me. I find out where they live through their eyes. Which means a lot of things have to be backtracked and refurbished when it's a Fantasy that's not based in OUR world.

When it's based in our history, the world is there, and it's a huge amount of research to be done. But the way that the characters inform me where and how they're living is still from them. And usually I'm not so savvy as they are as to how they live, so I have to pay attention.

One example would be in GREENWODE, when Gamelyn sees the whip scars on Robyn's back. I rather took it for granted that Robyn likely had them, being the stroppy sort he is, but I didn't know why or how until Gamelyn asked.

It's character building that spreads, I guess.


message 6: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments For those who might be shy, here's an excerpt from GREENWODE to lure you from lurking...
--------------------------------

Gamelyn came riding up just as Rob finished lunch with his sister and was speeding down the front stair.

And every careful plan Rob had made went flying out his ears.

It wasn’t just because Gamelyn suddenly looked akin to something out of an ancient tale, more centaur than mere rider upon that great gray stallion, in a cape with the sheen and color of dried blood and fair hair flicking across his face with the wind. It wasn’t because this time he had an escort riding at Diamant’s tail, a mailed and helmeted soldier that made Rob’s mouth go dry with several seconds of honest fear, then his hackles rise in just-as-honest fury. It wasn’t just because the likelihood of Rob leaving for any clandestine meeting with a wolfshead was likely swolloped now that a nobleman’s son was in residence. Or that Gamelyn was as sure a liability for Rob as Will was for Marion—worse, for more reasons than Rob wanted to count.

It was, somehow, all of those things and none of them, because topping them all was the sense of a warning, a dangerous breath down his neck, time canting sideways and sending itself forward into tens of unknowns.

If he couldn’t even trust his own feelings to not turn and gut him, then who could he trust?

Even if he wanted to.

“Rob!”

The broad smile made Rob’s heart jerk then shudder heat against his breastbone, and all he could think was, And what evil sprite gave you both that lovely smile and such lovely rotten timing? Gamelyn dismounted in one graceful, powerful move, took the rein in one gloved hand, and walked forward. One hand on his sword’s pommel, there was a proper swordsman’s swagger to him that surely, surely he’d not had the last time Rob had seen him… had it truly been only a se’nnight ago, that eager pup in the barn?

And how was it, again, that Gamelyn should look like every mortal sin his Church could conjure up, while Rob looked like something from the rubbish tip, all sweat, dirt, and dander from mucking out a stable.
And if he had straw in his hair, he’d not even had the mouth job to go with it this time.

The smile on Gamelyn’s face slipped, a little, as Rob merely nodded. Rob truly didn’t trust his voice. A slight frown quirking his brow, Gamelyn gave Diamant a pat, dug a treat from his purse and spoke the horse’s name—ah, so that was how he’d managed to get the nappy bugger’s attention.

And that throaty caress of language—directed toward a horse!—only made Rob’s heart give another lurch and bump.

And he was bloody pathetic.

“Sir Gamelyn!”

And why should Marion sound all… happy? As if she’d nowt on her mind that a visit from His Lordship wouldn’t sweep away like dried-out cobwebs. She came flying down the stairs and pounced on Gamelyn, gave him a great buss on the cheek then a hug that made Diamant cock a wary ear and might’ve broken a rib or two if Gamelyn hadn’t been wearing a chainmail tunic under his surcoat.

Chainmail. Pretentious… nobleman.

And Gamelyn’s broad, lovely smile returned. He lifted Marion off her feet, gave Rob a glance that surely said, See, this is what a real greeting looks like, you pillock! then closed his eyes and returned Marion’s hug all the fiercer.

But all Rob could think of was how, did he have the chance, he’d show Sir Gamelyn a greeting, all right, one that would weaken his knees and pop his eyes from his head….

Save him, and he couldn’t even ask the Horned Lord for strength. Ask a fertility god with a knob as subtle as a pikestaff to help him deflate?

Aye, that was likely.

He’s another lad, Rob gave it a game try, nevertheless. Surely you’d rather I fancied a lass with huge breasts and nice wide hips, to make lots more little fawns to sing your name in the night.

No answer, but it took care of his inconvenient erection, right enough. Sent it, all nice and pliable, back where it belonged.

“What are you doing here, all….” Marion trailed off as she got a better look at Gamelyn’s companion, and Rob could sense the sudden fear in her, felt fury once more lick fire behind his eyes.

“Why is he here?” he growled, jerking his head to the soldier.

Oddly enough, the soldier didn’t look like the normal bully in mail; his broad shoulders were hunched, his gaze averted to the ground. Hiding something, sure enough.

Marion’s gaze flitted to his, warning, even as Gamelyn shrugged, his smile fading once again.

“My father’s orders.”

Marion pushed back slightly, once more shooting a wary glance in Rob’s direction. “Your… father?”

Rob felt the breath stutter in his chest. Casually he pretended to clasp his hands behind his back, one going for the dagger he always kept sheathed above his right buttock.

Gamelyn was smiling. “I’m here on legitimate business, this time.”

Rob’s fingers touched the dagger’s pommel, caressed their way into a grip.

“Off with you, then,” Gamelyn told the soldier, turning to him. “Find a place where you’ll be comfortable, and you’ll have done your duty.”

The soldier made a stiff, awkward bow, turned first to Marion then to Rob with somewhat deeper, but hastier bows, then mounted and wheeled his horse. It seemed that he couldn’t retreat fast enough.

Again, Marion shot a glance to her brother. “He’s… leaving.”

Rob had already fingered his dagger halfway to his shoulder blade, nearly free. He paused, uncertain.
Gamelyn was watching the soldier go. “Aye, he wasn’t happy about encroaching upon your place this far, believe me. But this way he can satisfy both his orders and his conscience.” Gamelyn shrugged, turned back to them. “We’ve come to an understanding, he and I, seeing as how he seems to be as wary of….” He trailed off, seemed to notice Rob’s wary stance. “What?”

“Why are you here?” Rob said, quiet.

“I….” Gamelyn looked confused. “Well, I’m here to make sure you’re both all right. And this time, like I told you, my father sent me. He’s… well, he’s very sick and wants your mother’s help; he’s insistent that she come and attend to him. It was the perfect way to make sure that you were both all right.”

Silence, with only the retreating hoofbeats of the soldier disappearing over the near rise.

Marion smacked Gamelyn upside the head.

“Ow! Marion, what the—?”

“You great silly… git!” she burst out. “Coming in here all tarted up with a soldier on your tail… after what’s happened! Have you lost your bloody mind?”

Gamelyn’s mouth dropped. He closed it, put steepled hands to his face. “Oh.”

“You’d better do a sodding sight better than ‘oh’,” she retorted.

“I didn’t mean… I’m sorry.”

Rob flipped his dagger in the air and caught it, his gaze smacking into Gamelyn’s. “I was ready for him, lad. Don’t ever do that again.”

The green eyes were wide, stricken. “I didn’t—”

“Didna think,” Rob supplied, and stuck his dagger back in his belt.


message 7: by Koozebane (new)

Koozebane | 113 comments Finally made it here--the excerpts look great!


message 8: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Koozebane wrote: "Finally made it here--the excerpts look great!"
Welcome, welcome!

Are you a fan of Historical? Fantasy? Romance? All in a lovely melange? And of course, have you read either of the books yet, or are they on your TBR list?


message 9: by Koozebane (new)

Koozebane | 113 comments I'm mostly into contemporaries, m/m-wise, but a good historical is always nice. I'm just getting into steampunk, too...


message 10: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Another incentive to not be shy:

Everyone who comments today will get a chance to win a signed, trade paper copy of their choice of either GREENWODE or SHIREWODE. So come on in and make your presence known.


message 11: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Koozebane wrote: "I'm mostly into contemporaries, m/m-wise, but a good historical is always nice. I'm just getting into steampunk, too..."

I've always had a fondness for steampunk, ever since the original Wild, Wild West. Which I guess sort of dates me. :/ What periods of historical do you prefer?


message 12: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments Hello. (I'm just getting into steampunk, myself, too :)

Not sure about anyone else, but my tastes in historical periods tend to change over time...but I also think that a really good story can reach out to you no matter what time period it's in. I actually struggled with the Robin Hood/Crusades period *until* I read Greenwode. I had read other things that just didn't speak to me, before having read this book; but now, I'd be open to things from any time period as long as it had a good story and good characters to back it up :)


message 13: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Research on the internet is such a recent thing, full of as many perils as pleasures. But the amount of visual images available is truly wondrous. I visited a lot of place in my research, but one place I've never gotten to visit is the Nottingham Caves, which I used pretty heavily in SHIREWODE. Well, about 6 months ago I found this site on YouTube that lets you go through the caves, virtually. It is AMAZING. Here's the link to the one of Mortimer's Hole:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6DJU0...

The only thing is, now I really want to visit the caves in person!


message 14: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments J wrote: "Research on the internet is such a recent thing, full of as many perils as pleasures. But the amount of visual images available is truly wondrous. I visited a lot of place in my research, but one..."

Oh wow. I don't blame you for wanting to visit the caves in person. I definitely need to add this to my list of things to visit next time I'm over in the UK. Thanks, J! The last time I was there, I drove through Derby, just to the west of Nottingham...we wanted to go to the Forest but there just wasn't time. Maybe next time, though now when I visit I'd probably feel like I'm channeling Rob and Gamelyn, ha.


message 15: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments Research on the internet really is amazing these days. Nothing can compare to being there, but sometimes you can almost come close. I love being able to look at photos, and 360-degree views, of places when I'm trying to picture the scene in my mind's eye.


message 16: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Jesse wrote: "Hello. (I'm just getting into steampunk, myself, too :)

Not sure about anyone else, but my tastes in historical periods tend to change over time...but I also think that a really good story can rea..."


Hullo, and welcome!
I totally agree. Story trumps many things. And characters I can dig into. I don't have to like them, but I have to feel something.

I will confess to liking to read historical periods I don't know entirely too much about. That way I'm not picking nits instead of enjoying myself. And no matter how much you research, there are always nits! ;)


message 17: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Jesse wrote: "J wrote: "Research on the internet is such a recent thing, full of as many perils as pleasures. But the amount of visual images available is truly wondrous. I visited a lot of place in my researc..."

Channelling... *snort* I love it. Last time we were in England, Spouse and I went on some serious castle crawling and wished we had our longbows to aid in our own channelling of Outlaw Spirits. I'm sure the castle caretakers are used to it by now, but it was lovely fun. And who cares if we're supposed to be grown up?

Those caves... the video is AWEsome, in its original meaning. Both times we tried to get in they were closed for something, and I wanted to howl.

Just be careful how much you channel Robyn and Gamelyn, though. They live a might dangerously, methinks. ;)


message 18: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments J wrote: "Jesse wrote: "Hello. (I'm just getting into steampunk, myself, too :)

Not sure about anyone else, but my tastes in historical periods tend to change over time...but I also think that a really good..."


Yes, I can see how that could be. If one knows a good bit about a certain historical time period and s/he reads something that is blatantly inaccurate, historically speaking, it would be hard not to pick nits. That's sort of like watching a movie where a character is "playing" the piano but in reality they're hitting all the wrong notes at the wrong time, but the audio is dubbed over with perfect flawless piano.

Had you been interested (research-wise) in the late 12th century (hope I got that right...) before writing Greenwode and Shirewode? I remember reading that the first incarnation of Greenwode had been written some time ago. Was the love interest M/M even in its first incarnation, when you originally wrote it?


message 19: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments J wrote: Channelling... *snort* I love it. Last time we were in England, Spouse and I went on some serious castle crawling and wished we had our longbows to aid in our own channelling of Outlaw Spirits. I'm sure the castle caretakers are used to it by now, but it was lovely fun. And who cares if we're supposed to be grown up?

Exploring amazing old castles can do that to a person :) I can completely relate...I totally feel like I'd want a sword (or a bow) in my hand as I stormed around letting my imagination get the better of me...how can one NOT visit a place like that and be swept away?


message 20: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Here's another excerpt, from SHIREWODE. It's when Guy de Gisbourne think he's finally outsmarted Robyn Hood and infiltrated the pagan ritual of Hallows (Samhain):
---------------------------------

It could rival a market day in Nottingham: individuals drinking, eating, sitting and standing and dancing. All masked, from the simplest of things to elaborate and detailed, limbs bared to the firelight, most garbed with some outlandish overtunic or tatterdemalion cape. Guy relaxed as he came closer to the main fire, noting everything.

Including the fact that it was roiling up into one amazing revelry.

A woman bumped into him by accident, turned to apologize. Her eyes went big as they met his, and for a horrific and nerve-twining instant Guy thought he was somehow discovered. She started laughing and let out a whoop.

“Th’ Hob! The Hobby!”

Hob? Guy remembered the name all too well, and it shook him. What?

At first none heard the woman. Guy tried to back away, lose himself in the crowd from whatever had amused her—she was probably drunk, nothing more. But as he retreated he found others turning to him, and soon the woman’s cry was shifting through the crowd, and they were turning to him with the same glee.

“The’ ’Ob ’Oss!”

“Th’ Wode Horse! The Tup!”

The Tup... The Wode Horse... It hissed through and over the crowd, excited murmurs, echoes in the trees.

“Aye, the Tup! An’ he’s brung seed to th’ dying ground!”

Within a matter of moments, Guy was amidst a small crowd of masked revelers, a dance twining and spiraling about him. The ones coming the closest were mostly females, and they were laughing, each trying to shove the other toward him.

Guy had to forcibly make himself not turn tail and run. Inconceivable, that a bunch of maidens would nearly make him retreat when he had faced down desert armies.

Abruptly he remembered the teeth on his mask, groped at his chest for and yanked at the string. The teeth snapped together with decided effect; the lasses shrieked, darted away. But they were laughing, and they kept coming back for more.

Fairly soon he was the center of laughing and hollering folk, pulled into the line of the dance. He went along. There was something thoroughly exhilarating about the wanton energy of it, the familiarity that must be speaking to his mother’s Saxon blood….

Another mark on you….

Hubert’s voice, reminder and sobriety.

You have the right….

Nay, I really, really don’t.


And just like that, Guy was back in himself, the detached weapon looking for something to cut into.
The dancing line swung past the river, curled about, and came back to the caverns. Guy played his part, every sense he had waiting. Waiting.

“’Tis time for the horseplay, aye?” A growling purl of a baritone, its common accent not dodging its power in the least. Everyone turned, expectant. If Guy hadn’t known who he was, the surge forward and murmurings of the surrounding people told him.
Waiting was over. It stood, limned in the largest of the cavern openings. A man… a beast… unbelievably tall with an immense, fourteen-point rack seeming to sprout from the cowled head. Caped with furs and feathers, rags and leathers, it was impossible to see body shape, or to discern if there truly was a body beneath. The sight of it stirred the unlikeliest of fears in the deepest places; Guy barely caught himself from angling back in sheer instinct. It was the gilt on the tines, and the glint of chain—bronze and silvered—dangling from the rack of antlers like the scrapings of velvet, which pulled him further from superstitious instinct, from reaction to rational.

This was no simple pilfer from the king’s deer… the horns held upon them more wealth than any of these peasants would see in a lifetime. The Horns of the god? Was Guy looking at part of what his master had sent him for—one of the artifacts that this murderous wolfshead had stolen?

The beast-man’s fire-lit eyes locked on him. Guy abruptly found himself in the midst of the circle, the masked revelers parting around him. He was left solitary, ringed by masked faces and glittering eyes.

“Did you think I’d let you do this, Gisbourne?” Full of some deep emotion, the beast-man’s mellifluous voice slapped Guy sideways and, inexplicably, traced shivers across his skin. “Take him.”

They fell on him, silent and purposeful.


message 21: by Koozebane (new)

Koozebane | 113 comments I kind of like recent historicals (Charlie Cochet's '30s-era stories spring to mind, and I'd love to read something about the glam-rock era), but a lot of it depends on the setting and characters, too. Medieval times just feel right with English places to me, for some reason!


message 22: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 14 comments Koozebane wrote: "...and I'd love to read something about the glam-rock era..."

J! David Bowie! Do it! OMG DOOOOOOO IIIIIIIT!!!!!!!!!


message 23: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 03:13PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Jesse wrote: "J wrote: "Jesse wrote: "Hello. (I'm just getting into steampunk, myself, too :)

Not sure about anyone else, but my tastes in historical periods tend to change over time...but I also think that a r..."


Or the violin when they're just scratching the bow back and forth. (I assume you play the piano, then? I played when I was younger, and it is still my favourite instrument to listen to.)

I've always been a sucker for the outlaw ballads, and of course there's so many theories about where RH started... they're not even sure that Gamelyn started with Chaucer, it's suspected the tale is older than that. As to the 12th century (and yes, you're right :) ) I have to say it was likely The Lion In Winter that first made me really interested in that period. it was the first movie to be more... well, lived in. The writing of it was what made me want more. *sigh* Even then, it was Story, and Character, eh?

As to the first incarnation of GREENWODE, I'm afraid I was very much the usual pedestrian expectation with Marion being the love interest. But there was this chemistry between Robyn and Gamelyn at the time, no question... more 'bromance'. But the connection was there. Waiting for me to quit being so damn pedestrian and figure out what they wanted. ;)

I wasn't a good enough writer to write these books, not then. They're the books they were meant to be, now.

What time frames have you preferred so far, Jesse?


message 24: by Koozebane (new)

Koozebane | 113 comments Carole wrote: "Koozebane wrote: "...and I'd love to read something about the glam-rock era..."

J! David Bowie! Do it! OMG DOOOOOOO IIIIIIIT!!!!!!!!!"


Yeah! Hell, yeah! :-)


message 25: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Carole wrote: "Koozebane wrote: "...and I'd love to read something about the glam-rock era..."

J! David Bowie! Do it! OMG DOOOOOOO IIIIIIIT!!!!!!!!!"


David Bowie!!! He's is just... magnetic.

The Spouse keeps trying to get me to write that contemporary: a seedy expose on the Arabian Horse show world. Sex! Cheating! Stud fees! *chuckle*


message 26: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Jesse wrote: "J wrote: Channelling... *snort* I love it. Last time we were in England, Spouse and I went on some serious castle crawling and wished we had our longbows to aid in our own channelling of Outlaw Spi..."

Royston Cave is another amazing place. They think it was one of the bottle-shaped 'dead man holes', where they tossed people down and forgot about them. I stood in the bottom of that and looked up and thought, yeah. Better to just cut your own throat than stay very long in one of these...


message 27: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 04:33PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Koozebane wrote: "Carole wrote: "Koozebane wrote: "...and I'd love to read something about the glam-rock era..."

J! David Bowie! Do it! OMG DOOOOOOO IIIIIIIT!!!!!!!!!"

Yeah! Hell, yeah! :-)"


Anything with David Bowie is just made of awesome. He would make ten wonderful characters his own self.


message 28: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments J wrote: "Jesse wrote: "J wrote: "Jesse wrote: "Hello. (I'm just getting into steampunk, myself, too :)

Not sure about anyone else, but my tastes in historical periods tend to change over time...but I also ..."


Piano is my first love, musically speaking...been playing almost as long as I've been walking. I do play violin too (well, 'fiddle' would be more of an appropriate term for the style I play...I will never claim to play well, but I've been playing for long enough that I can spot a fake in violin, as well...and you really don't develop an appreciation for how skilled a violinist has to be to make it seem so effortless...)

I love the outlaw ballads, as well :) And somehow I figured the first time around Robyn's love interest was Marion...nothing wrong with that either, though obviously I'm thrilled you ended up taking the path you did. My earliest attempts at writing had a 'bromance' going on, kind of my subconscious trying to rear its head but not quite being able to. I wrote a fantasy piece once (one of those books that will never ever ever ever EVERRRR see the light of day, and I cringe to think of it, but you have to start somewhere) that had an element like that. And I've read several books where there was just the barest hint of chemistry between two of the male characters, but it was never acknowledged or expounded upon. Which is why it was SUCH a treat to read Greenwode. I was cheering half the time just because it was so great to see the love interest go that way for once.

(And again, you really hit the nail on the head. I'm beyond impressed.)

I've been drawn to the exploration era...16th and 17th centuries...as well as the 18th. Recently I've been interested in the late 19th century...as well as the early 1970s which isn't really "historical" per se, but I've been thinking it would be interesting to write something from that era with some sort of twist to the story. An idea for someday, down the road, maybe.


message 29: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments J wrote: Royston Cave is another amazing place. They think it was one of the bottle-shaped 'dead man holes', where they tossed people down and forgot about them. I stood in the bottom of that and looked up and thought, yeah. Better to just cut your own throat than stay very long in one of these... i>

Mmm. I'm taking notes. (Thanks again for the ideas). I spent some time in a forgotten stone circle down in Cornwall, and a couple of caves along the cliffs there, but this sounds even better.



message 30: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 36 comments J wrote: "The Spouse keeps trying to get me to write that contemporary: a seedy expose on the Arabian Horse show world. Sex! Cheating! Stud fees! *chuckle*..."

Hey, I would read that. Although I also like historical/fantasy/whoozits melange :)


message 31: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Jesse wrote: "J wrote: "Jesse wrote: "J wrote: "Jesse wrote: "Hello. (I'm just getting into steampunk, myself, too :)

Not sure about anyone else, but my tastes in historical periods tend to change over time...b..."


Well, the 1st GW was a looong time ago, and though for as long as I can remember, alternate sexualities and races have been in my writing, I really did take the road mostly travelled, there. But the lads were patient, and let me flounder about. I'm sure they were, all 3 of them, rolling their eyes at me.

I have books like that, too. We all do. But every book gets better. And we get more relaxed in ourselves, and are willing to stretch boundaries, whatever they might be. We all have them, somewhere. And they need stretching!

I am SO glad GW and SW spoke to that part of you, and gave you something that you weren't finding. :D

The exporation era... wow, is that an interesting subject. Particularly since the history is so divided! I have ancestors from both sides of that, you see, and it's a very fascinating subject. We'll have to talk about it more.

And the 70s... heh. I've an old story working about a Russian agent and a defector ballerina... you've made me think I should drag it out.

It all sounds very interesting, Jesse! Keep at it.


message 32: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Kaje wrote: "J wrote: "The Spouse keeps trying to get me to write that contemporary: a seedy expose on the Arabian Horse show world. Sex! Cheating! Stud fees! *chuckle*..."

Hey, I would read that. Although I ..."


Hullo, welcome!

Augh, I lived it for so long, I'm still not sure I can turn about and write it. But man, it would seriously be a case of 'writing from one's experience of life' sort of thing...


message 33: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Hey, everyone, before I forget...

I've a coupon code to thank all of you for stopping by. For 48 hours from the beginning of this chat, you will receive 25% off GREENWODE, SHIREWODE, and all high Fantasy titles on the Dreamspinner Press site. Woot!

Just use this code for ordering: Hennig0914


message 34: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments J wrote: "Hey, everyone, before I forget...

I've a coupon code to thank all of you for stopping by. For 48 hours from the beginning of this chat, you will receive 25% off GREENWODE, SHIREWODE, and all high..."


But we still have about 20 minutes before I have to wrap it up, so are there any questions in particular I can answer?

And actually, I'd like to ask one of all of you: If you could choose any medieval weaponry to sport with, what would it be? And why?


message 35: by Koozebane (new)

Koozebane | 113 comments I like the cudgel. Low-tech, effective, and fun to say!


message 36: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments A Russian agent and a defector ballerina...really! It probably goes without saying that, from reading GW, I will immediately buy any book that you write, but I confess I am quite interested to see what you would do with a story set more toward the present day. That would bring its own surprises, I'm sure. I've been reading a lot of stuff written in the 70s...including some spy/adventure books that feature Russian agents and the like. Neat!

I'd have to do a lot more research before I attempted writing anything from the exploration era, but I have always been drawn to it. Probably more the romantic idea of it than the reality, of course...but "adventure on the high seas" was always something that has captivated me. Finding unexpected islands, abandoned cities, etc. You could go in a lot of different directions with that period...as you said, there are different sides to the story.

Though it's a bit later in time, when I was in college I wrote a short story set during the American Revolution, from the point of view of the wife of a British officer who had stayed in the colonies long after most loyalists had hied to Canada or back home to Britain...looking at both sides of an event, forwards and backwards (and inside-out), can be such fun.


message 37: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 03:56PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Koozebane wrote: "I like the cudgel. Low-tech, effective, and fun to say!"

It IS fun to say, isn't it? And you really can make one out of anything natural and handy. Or unnatural!


message 38: by Jesse (new)

Jesse (jlmr417) | 9 comments J wrote: If you could choose any medieval weaponry to sport with, what would it be? And why?

I usually would say a sword of some sort (though preferably something light that you can sort of be a bit pompous with while sparring...one can't be sprightly with a broadsword...)

But now I think I'd enjoy a bow, too. Actually, I DO enjoy shooting a bow...but an old-fashioned one would be impressive. (And harder to wield than it appears, I'm sure). But boys do look quite dashing when armed with a nice longbow.

Thank you for your time, J. It was great to get to chat with you for a bit!

One last half-question...you do have other writing projects planned, right? Ones that hopefully one day will turn into books that we get to purchase and enjoy? :)


message 39: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 14 comments J wrote: "If you could choose any medieval weaponry to sport with, what would it be? And why?"

I don't know why I even had to think about this one, really. A crossbow. I love a longbow, and I love how it's all about your own strength and the sort of... connection you have to it. There's a sinuous beauty to it, even when it's used for deadly force.

But a crossbow--there's a blunt but still almost esoteric power to it. The thwap of the release and the thunk of the bolt hitting home. Although I spent most of my archery days with a longbow--and I was actually pretty good at it--there's an elegance to a longbow that I just don't possess. The straightforwardness of a crossbow suits more.

So I prefer a longbow, but a crossbow is more 'me'.


message 40: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Jesse wrote: "A Russian agent and a defector ballerina...really! It probably goes without saying that, from reading GW, I will immediately buy any book that you write, but I confess I am quite interested to see ..."

The Cold War era spy books were terrific.

And yes, RESEARCH. I am its bitch. Love it, but there's more than a little S&M in the relationship, to be sure. I am big fan of high seas adventure, myself. Very romantic, but also with the seedy underbelly.


message 41: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 04:24PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Wow, the time really did go by faster than I thought it would. I still have a few answers to make, but lets take care of business first:

To be sure I have all the names right for the drawing:
Koosebane
Jesse
Kaje
Carole

I will write them down, put them in a cup and let the Spouse draw one out. Come back in about five minutes
and check, and if it's your name you can send me your address for the book: jtulloshennig at gmail dot com


message 42: by J. (last edited Sep 14, 2013 04:21PM) (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments I have many writing projects planned, actually. Carole asked about ideas earlier, and she was being a smart alec, but really, I have too many ideas.

I did just finish a book that is set more in the culture of Indigenous Americas than Western Europe. It is a series, and hopefully someone will publish it.

And I don't think I'm going to get out of the Wode books without at least another one. ;) They are Insistent.


message 43: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments And thanks to all of you for coming and sharing with me! The winner, drawn out of a big straw hat by the Spouse, is...

Kaje!

Please let me know which book you would like, Kaje, and how best to send it, and how you want it inscribed. Please email me at jtulloshennig (at) gmail (dot) com And I hope you enjoy it!

Thank you all so much for visiting. Have a wonderful weekend!


message 44: by Kaje (last edited Sep 14, 2013 04:36PM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 36 comments Honestly, I have to stop showing up at free book drawings - my luck is getting embarrassing. (Especially when I managed all of one comment.) But thank you :) I'll email you. That's very cool. (Thanks Carole for pointing me this way at an opportune moment too.)


message 45: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 36 comments Congratulations on Greenwode reaching the Honorable Mention level of the Rainbow awards - good luck in reaching the finals.


message 46: by J. (new)

J. Hennig | 25 comments Kaje wrote: "Congratulations on Greenwode reaching the Honorable Mention level of the Rainbow awards - good luck in reaching the finals."

I just found out by getting your post in the mail--and there were notifications below it. Double goodies! Thank you, Kaje. :)


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