Wodehouse cracks me up discussion

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Favorite Wodehouse short story

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message 1: by Dan, Tenth Earl of Emsworth (new)

Dan Schwent (akagunslinger) | 114 comments Mod
Mine's The Crime Wave at Blandings. Who would have thought an air rifle could cause so much trouble?


message 2: by Ian (new)

Ian Wood | 3 comments 'Crime Wave at Blandings' is definently the best Blandings short story but my favorite overall would have to be 'Romance at Droitgate Spa' from 'Eggs, Beans and Crumpets'.

The Magicial, Mortimer Rackstraw, is absolutly fantastic and his final flourish is the best ending of any short story or possibly that should just be of any story.


message 3: by jennifer (new)

jennifer (mascarawand) | 8 comments My favorite is "Jeeves and The Song of Songs" where Tuppy Glossop has fallen in love with the opera singer, who is,"...in shape, a bit on the lines of the Albert Hall."


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian (ianw) | 10 comments My favourite short story - "Honeysuckle Cottage", a Mr Mulliner story.


message 5: by Dan, Tenth Earl of Emsworth (new)

Dan Schwent (akagunslinger) | 114 comments Mod
Ian wrote: "My favourite short story - "Honeysuckle Cottage", a Mr Mulliner story."

I don't think I've read that one. Which book is that story in?


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian (ianw) | 10 comments Dan wrote: "Ian wrote: "My favourite short story - "Honeysuckle Cottage", a Mr Mulliner story."

I don't think I've read that one. Which book is that story in?"


It's in "Meet Mr. Mulliner", a collection of nine short stories published in 1927.


message 7: by Dan, Tenth Earl of Emsworth (new)

Dan Schwent (akagunslinger) | 114 comments Mod
I have Meet Mr. Mulliner so I guess I must have read it. Perhaps it's time I re-read it.


message 8: by Frederick (new)

Frederick "The Clicking of Cuthbert." The Russian Wodehouse Society, which, indeed, exists, probably loves this one, and, thanks to Sir Plum's good nature, for the right reasons. This story, about a Russian golfer on a British course, is not a snide bit of stereotyping, but a bit of SEEMINGLY snide stereotyping. Light, effortless and masterful. Wodehouse in peak form.Clicking of Cuthbert


message 9: by Dan, Tenth Earl of Emsworth (new)

Dan Schwent (akagunslinger) | 114 comments Mod
Even though I find televised golf boring and have no desire to play, I really enjoy Wodehouse's golf stories. That's always one of my selling points when I try to get people to read Wodehouse: He makes golf fun to read about.


message 10: by Brian (new)

Brian Steed (seamusp) | 21 comments I love the mad plots of the Mulliner stories. The one that comes to mind now is "The Code of the Mulliners" - young man happens to spy his mother performing the most bizarre facial contortions, concludes that she's gone loopy, and spends the rest of the story nobly trying to lose favor with his fiance so that she'll break their engagement, thus saving her from marrying into a family with a history of insanity. His every scheme to this end has the opposite of the desired effect, naturally. Includes one of my favorite Wodehouse scenes, where young Mulliner tries insulting the girl's bore of an uncle in the middle of his "rhinoceros" story (spoiler: even this brave effort spectacularly fails to lose him any favor with anyone).


Trevor (I no longer get notified of comments) I have to agree with Seth, Goodbye to all cats is one of the funniest things I've ever read. The line the father says to his daughter when he meets her young man, "Who's the half-wit?" Will be the model upon which I hope to base my relationship with the young men that come around after my daughters.


message 12: by Zedder (new)

Zedder | 11 comments My first choice is "Uncle Fred Flits By," though "The Crime Wave at Blandings" is a close second.


message 13: by Prateek (new)

Prateek (prateeklibros) | 2 comments My dedicated lens to Jeeves & Wooster. It is incomplete but planning to make it more.

http://www.squidoo.com/jeeves-and-woo...


Suggestions are welcome


message 14: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrew619) Hi. Until now I have never read anything by Wodehouse and I would demand you what would be a good novel to begin.
Thanks!


message 15: by Prateek (new)

Prateek (prateeklibros) | 2 comments Andrew wrote: "Hi. Until now I have never read anything by Wodehouse and I would demand you what would be a good novel to begin.
Thanks!"


Hey! Andrew!

I would suggest to begin the series with "The Inimitable Jeeves".

I have creating this squidoo page just for reader who want get into world of jeeves.


message 16: by Somdutta (new)

Somdutta | 4 comments I have read plenty of Wodehouse, but cannot think of any one favourite short story. Ukridge's Dog College is certainly very funny.


message 17: by Cindy (new)

Cindy | 38 comments Thank you Jeeves, or My Man Jeeves!! Great books to start with. Also the same with me, I cannot think of one short story title off the top of my head.


message 18: by Cindy (new)

Cindy | 38 comments A really good novel to start with, I think, is Luck of the Bodkins by P.G. Wodehouse . Monty is one of my fav Wodehouse characters!!


message 19: by Andrew (last edited Apr 21, 2013 11:15PM) (new)

Andrew (andrew619) Thank you all. As soon as possible I'll start with one of these.


message 20: by Beverly (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) One of my favorites is the golfing story "Excelsior" about the young man who is ordered by his boss to lose a golf game to a potential business client. The goings on at this game had me ROFL. Several years ago, I read it aloud to my golf-playing dad on a road trip, and he also thought it was a hoot.


message 21: by Beverly (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) I was wondering if any of the Wodehouse fans in this group could help me with this:

I am trying to remember the title of one of his short stories that I read many years ago, in an anthology of Wodehouse short stories.

The story involved a vicar's daughter and the two young men who were competing in vying for her affections. The vicar's daughter was organizing and running some kind of church fete, and she put both of these young would-be suitors to work.
The part I remember the best is that she sent one of the young men on an outing with the senior citizens. They were riding on a bus, and the seniors were lobbing tomatoes out of the bus at bicyclists. When they reached their destination, an amusement park, the seniors created so much chaos that they were ousted from the park.
I don't remember what the other young man was assigned to do, I believe he had to help with some children's activity.

Does anyone know the name of this story?


message 22: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Oh | 1 comments Was it "Tried in the Furnace"? If I recall correctly, it was all older women--which fits with the Wodehouse motif :-)


message 23: by Beverly (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) Patricia wrote: "Was it "Tried in the Furnace"? If I recall correctly, it was all older women--which fits with the Wodehouse motif :-)"

Patricia-- I will look for that story and see if it is the one I was thinking of. Thank you so much!


message 24: by Richard (new)

Richard Walsh (richard_walsh) | 2 comments Definitely "Tried in the Furnace". I read it in the story collection Young Men in Spats.


message 25: by Beverly (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) Patricia wrote: "Was it "Tried in the Furnace"? If I recall correctly, it was all older women--which fits with the Wodehouse motif :-)"
and Richard:
I finally got a copy of The Most Of P.G. Wodehouse through my library system. And yes, thank you both so much, that is the story I was trying to remember, but couldn't remember the title of.


message 26: by Michael (new)

Michael Wilton (michaelroll) | 2 comments The Blanding ones are my favourites,with Monty coming a close second. However, my favourite Mulliner story is called, "The Story of Webster", followed by "Cats will be Cats" featured in "Mulliners Nights"(one of his earlier offerings printed in 1933 by Herbert Jenkins)in which a staid cat called Webster influenced by his upright owner, the Dean of Bolsover, almost persuades his nephew Lancelot to give up his alleged wordly fiancée, Gladys Bingley in favour of a girl called Brenda Carberry-Pirbright. He was saved by the cat lapping up a spilled bottle of whiskey and going on a toot,turning into a gangster and cleaning up the neighbourhood. He went on to save his owner from falling prey to a certain Lady Widdrington, by mopping up her evil looking cat, Percy, and putting it to flight, so saving his master and earning Lancelot a very welcome cheque. But there are many others, as we know.


message 27: by Holly (new)

Holly | 6 comments "Uncle Fred Flits By." I'm also very partial to "Mr. Potter Takes a Rest Cure."


message 28: by W (new)

W Several Jeeves and Wooster stories,though I don't recall the names.


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