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The L&G Kitchen Party > Words I Have Come To Loathe

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message 1: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
For Ruth, it's literally. For me, it's basically. But that's the tip of the proverbial iceberg for both of us, no doubt.

What about you? What words drive you to distraction, either on their own accord or because they've been used (or misused) to death?


message 2: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
Let's throw in parameters, just for good measure.


message 3: by Ken (last edited Sep 02, 2013 01:49PM) (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Existential, which has been robbed from Sartre and Camus by the political hacks, who use it as a pig-in-pearls word for "exists." Duh....


message 4: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments "Issues" and "challenges" to describe difficulties or unpleasantness.


message 5: by Anthony (last edited Sep 02, 2013 02:36PM) (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments "Between a Rock and a Hard Place" has replaced the more traditional, "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea", which, though hackneyed, was more colourful. ("Hard Place", my backside!)


message 6: by Carol (last edited Sep 02, 2013 02:49PM) (new)

Carol | 10390 comments For me it is whatever with the attitude, or just saying .


message 7: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) I hate "awesome." When will it stop!


message 8: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Put them in the isolation cell, where Prof. Grammardore goes to work. Once they speak like civilized beings, the school lets them out.


message 9: by Anthony (last edited Sep 03, 2013 02:57AM) (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments More on "would have" ("would of", "wood've", etc.).

As a museum man, I frequently came across this tense (I called it "the past unlikely") in expressions such as, "Queen Elizabeth would have slept in this bed"; or "King John would have walked down this path on sunny evenings."

Its main use is for making spurious statements of fact when there is no real knowledge. It replaces statements such as "Queen Elizabeth slept in this bed - - -" or "King John walked down this path - - - " where one does indeed know the truth of the matter.

Better to say "probably" or "perhaps", or "I believe that - - -" or "King John might have - - ", if there is some doubt, not least because these expressions are more honest.


message 10: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Anthony D wrote: "More on "would have" ("would of", "wood've", etc.).

As a museum man, I frequently came across this tense (I called it "the past unlikely") in expressions such as, "Queen Elizabeth would have slep..."


I wish people would stop and think this honestly, but they don't. It's too easy to go colloquial.

Another word I'm tiring of: leverage as a verb.


message 11: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) I dislike "journal" used as a verb. I haven't heard it lately. Perhaps people are less introspective.


message 12: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Or how about "read" as a noun?


message 13: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) Grrr...like "Fifty Shades Of Gray was a good read?" A big bowl of wrong.


message 14: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Yeah. Like that! (Do you pour milk on wrong, or melt cheese on it?)


message 15: by Dianne (new)

Dianne | 276 comments Irregardless when they mean regardless. Arghhhhh!!!


message 16: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments So, I find "so" has been creeping in to supplement, "well" and "I say," as a useless introduction to a sentence. I don't thing we "so" in this context.


message 17: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Anthony D wrote: "So, I find "so" has been creeping in to supplement, "well" and "I say," as a useless introduction to a sentence. I don't thing we "so" in this context."

Yes, I've been noticing speakers who tack it on the beginning of every sentence they utter, almost like a stalling tactic for thinking. In that sense, "So..." is becoming like "Um...."


message 18: by Portia (new)

Portia Honestly


message 19: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Right?


message 20: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) Sick


message 21: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Wicked


message 22: by MissJessie (new)

MissJessie | 81 comments Shut UP!!!!! As a comment when the speaker says something completely unexpected.


message 23: by Elmwoodblues (new)

Elmwoodblues | 5 comments 'Literally,' when one can only hope the user literally had his mind blown.


message 24: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
very (in writing more than speaking, it's very annoying)


message 25: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments Actually, it's very, very annoying.


message 26: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
really, really annoying


message 27: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) Was it Twain who said to replace "very" with "damn" in all writing, then the editor would remove all the "damns" and the writing would be improved?


message 28: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
I know I've heard that. Sounds good to me.


message 29: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
When in doubt, say Twain said it. The man loved to talk.


message 30: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) I'm tired of "Seriously" unless it's the Geico owl speaking.


message 31: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Wow, do we have adverbs on the run or what? (Uh, hope no one's sick of "or what?" at the end of sentences....)


message 32: by Jane (last edited Sep 12, 2013 09:49AM) (new)

Jane Newengland wrote: "Wow, do we have adverbs on the run or what? (Uh, hope no one's sick of "or what?" at the end of sentences....)"

No, we don't. I loathe anything that's used as a 'filler'. Many adverbs are that--just something to let the speaker get his thoughts together a little more.


message 33: by Portia (new)

Portia I am fond of Geico's Maxwell the Pig. Wee, wee, weeee, all the way home."


message 34: by Jane (new)

Jane Portia, are you serious or sarcastic? :)

BTW, I never knew he had a name!


message 35: by Portia (new)

Portia I'm serious. It all started with the original commercial with the guy saying,"Can Geico really save you ...? Did the little pig cry wee, wee, wee ...."

I have all of the ones I know about with Maxwell on my laptop. The zip line is my fave.

My spouse likes the one with the wood chucks. Large grin. :>)


message 36: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
I'm lost.


message 37: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
Me, too.


message 38: by Elmwoodblues (new)

Elmwoodblues | 5 comments The woodchuck references, well, woodchucks chucking wood. As for the pig, I am literally in a fog.


message 39: by Portia (new)

Portia That's bucuz we are waaaay off topic.

Sorry.


message 40: by Elmwoodblues (new)

Elmwoodblues | 5 comments At the end of the day, you are right, Portia.


message 41: by Portia (new)

Portia Yes, Elmwoodblues. It was My Bad.


message 42: by Elmwoodblues (new)

Elmwoodblues | 5 comments No problem.
(Which is another major expression I have come to hate: saying 'thank you' to a waiter is being polite; hearing the response 'no problem' infers that bringing me that iced tea could have been a problem, but wasn't in this case.)
Now, get off my lawn!


message 43: by Ken (last edited Sep 13, 2013 01:40PM) (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Speaking of waiters, my dad goes ballistic when they say, "How's it going, guys?" even to the ladies. I tell him to lighten up, even if "guys" for "everyone" deserves loathed status....


message 44: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments I am originally from Ohio, and you guys was common usage and inclusive for all.


message 45: by Portia (new)

Portia I am originally from Pennsylvania and "you guys" is the accepted form of address for the northeastern part of the state as well as for New York State. For the Pittsburgh area, as we all know, the proper term is "youns" :-)

Now here is a pronunciation a truly loathe.

Pen-si-vania. There is a pencil in that state!


message 46: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments "Guys" among waiters has even reached Northern Ireland, maybe in the last three or four years. I was going to mention it as a pet hate, but Newengland beat me to it.


message 47: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) I hate when I order some dish, and the waiter says, "Awesome choice!!!"


message 48: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
I hate it when the waiter comes to check while you're eating and asks, "You still working on that?"

Sheesh, if it was work do you think I'd be here paying good money for it?


message 49: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
When I hear "y'all" up north. No, no, no. Leave it in Dixie, please.


message 50: by Jane (new)

Jane "Have a good day", "Have a nice day" or any of that ilk.


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