UK Book Club discussion

94 views
Genre Challenge 2013-15 > Sept 2013 - Classic novels (pre 20thC)

Comments Showing 1-50 of 73 (73 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
New month, new genre to challenge us. As ever Classics can only be in the eye of the beholder.....one person's Classic is a complete duffer to someone else. Not a genre I usually delve into....I blame this on the recurring nightmares about the size of my uni course reading lists lol, but I've got a couple in mind - Thérèse Raquin by Émile Zola and The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells .

What about you?


message 2: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I think I'm going to skip this month's genre challenge - pre-20thC classics are just not for me. That said, I do have The Time Machine on my kindle which is pretty short so maybe if I get the time, I'll read that.


message 3: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments I had ordered Henry James - What Maisie Knew by Henry James to read before seeing the film and it was written in 1890s! I might revisit Fontane Theodor 1819-1898 as I loved Effi Briest (Penguin Classics) by Theodor Fontane . Had kindled a Walpole but will keep that for when gothic wins.


message 4: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments I fancy Jules Verne, have 20'000 Leagues Under the Sea and have been meaning to read it for years! I really enjoyed Around the World in 80 Days so hopeful I'll like this one too.

September is pretty busy but I do have Cranford on the Kindle, will have to see how the time goes...


message 5: by Liz, Moderator (new)

Liz | 3425 comments Mod
Thanks for posting Ian. I'm finally going to read Anna Karenina; it's been on my 'to read' list for years and years.... Wish me luck!

(Firstly, I need to finish my current read for my local book club - Pure by Andrew Miller - which I'm really enjoying).

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy Pure by Andrew Miller


message 6: by Jonny (new)

Jonny (jonnybillinge) | 3 comments I was really hoping classics wouldn't win as my intimidating 1300 page copy of The Count of Monte Cristo has been sat in my room mocking me for a couple of years now. I guess I can still chicken out and find a different classic lurking about!


message 7: by Susan (new)

Susan I plan to read Candide by Voltaire......it will also be the 'V' on my AtoZ Challenge......


message 8: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Birt (gemmaloubirt) | 65 comments Finished Tess of the D'Urbervilles yesterday which was exhaustingly depressing but stunning nonetheless. I haven't read it for about ten years but well worth the revisit :-) Moved on to Treasure Island... Going to try and stick to Classics completely this month. I don't read half as many as I should and sometimes find they are easier to read in chunks as you get used to the language :-)


message 9: by Bill (new)

Bill | 2714 comments I've started my classic, Daniel Deronda (Penguin Classics) by George Eliot by George Eliot. It may take me a month to read it..


message 10: by Susan (new)

Susan Bill wrote: "I've started my classic, Daniel Deronda (Penguin Classics) by George Eliot by George Eliot. It may take me a month to read it.."

I read about a third of this last year, but wasn't keen....I loved both Middlemarch and The Mill on the Floss, so I'm not sure why this one didn't appeal.
I'll be interested to see what you think......I have Adam Bede on my bookcase, which a friend has highly recommended, so perhaps I'll try to get to that this month if possible.


message 11: by Kiwi Sarah (last edited Sep 02, 2013 11:32AM) (new)

Kiwi Sarah (mjs13) | 169 comments Have downloaded Candide by Voltaire by Voltare and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley by Mary Shelley;

both free for Kindle, both 18th century books, both shortish and so manageable and both books I have been meaning to read forever...

(althought I also really want to read Middlemarch too but that might be beyond what I currently have time for... on the "to read" list instead for the never-never...)


message 12: by Helen (new)

Helen | 4238 comments I hated Frankenstein when I attempted it.


message 13: by Kiwi Sarah (new)

Kiwi Sarah (mjs13) | 169 comments Helen wrote: "I hated Frankenstein when I attempted it."

Oooh really? Why was that??? Hoping that it's at least accessable enough language to read without stopping to process every three minutes...


message 14: by Helen (new)

Helen | 4238 comments I thought it was dull. I expected it to be more like the films I guess rather than him going to school. But, clearly, most people must like it or it would never have been filmed.


message 15: by Kiwi Sarah (last edited Sep 02, 2013 12:53PM) (new)

Kiwi Sarah (mjs13) | 169 comments Helen wrote: "I thought it was dull. I expected it to be more like the films I guess rather than him going to school. But, clearly, most people must like it or it would never have been filmed."

Luckily I had heard it was nothing like the films so my expectations are low on that count... interested to see what it's like now ;-)


message 16: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 265 comments I liked Frankenstein, Candide is interesting too. He has an...adventurous life.


message 17: by Kate, Moderator (new)

Kate | 1328 comments Mod
I quite enjoyed Frankenstein when I read it not so long ago. :)
I appear to be the only one about to plunge into the world of Dickens with Oliver Twist also picking up a D for A-Z.


message 18: by Laura (new)

Laura | 26 comments My choice for this month is Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. I hope it's not as miserable as Jude the Obscure was...


message 19: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Some good books already mentioned. I might join Trojanhorse and binge on Dickens this month - starting with Pickwick Papers.


message 20: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Birt (gemmaloubirt) | 65 comments Mandy wrote: "Some good books already mentioned. I might join Trojanhorse and binge on Dickens this month - starting with Pickwick Papers."

I read The Pickwick Papers back in January - a long long read but really interesting and funny - enjoy!!!


message 21: by Susan (new)

Susan Gemma....that's one of the few Dickens I haven't read....I've started it a few times but for some reason haven't continues.....I must give it another try....


message 22: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Middlemarch by George Eliot is a great read.


message 23: by Christine (new)

Christine | 4 comments I am listening to The Way We Live Now read by Timothy West (hoping that listening counts as well as reading). Trollope is among my favourite authors but this is a book I did not enjoy or finish first time round I seem to remember. Finding it very absorbing so far.


message 24: by Liz, Moderator (last edited Sep 03, 2013 06:51AM) (new)

Liz | 3425 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "My choice for this month is 'Far from the Madding Crowd' by Thomas Hardy. I hope it's not as miserable as 'Jude the Obscure' was..."

No, Far from the Madding Crowd is not nearly as miserable as Jude the Obscure. In fact, strangely for Hardy, it has a happy ending! I had to read it for 'O' Level (that dates me!), but have reread it since and enjoyed it so much more. I really liked Tess of the d'Urbervilles too, although that's not exactly a laugh-a-minute..... ;)


message 25: by Liz, Moderator (new)

Liz | 3425 comments Mod
Gemma wrote: "Going to try and stick to Classics completely this month. I don't read half as many as I should and sometimes find they are easier to read in chunks as you get used to the language :-) ..."

I agree, it takes a while to get into the language. I find I need to 'hear' the voices, then I'm OK. It usually takes me about 50 pages, especially if I'm coming from something very different in style.


message 26: by Sarah (last edited Sep 03, 2013 04:39PM) (new)

Sarah (sarahlou29) Having read 4 classics last month, I'll only choose 1 or 2 this time round. I'm thinking of North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell and Little Women (Little Women, #1) by Louisa May Alcott


message 27: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments Laura wrote: "My choice for this month is Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. I hope it's not as miserable as Jude the Obscure was..."

It's not... read on...


message 28: by Em (last edited Sep 04, 2013 02:15PM) (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments I like this genre but I can't see myself managing more than one (two at an absolute push) and it'll probably take me into next month. I'm so blimmin' busy this month - my reading time is going to be considerably curtailed.


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm not sure if classics are my thing. I am finally getting to the end of Crime and Punishment, which has been hard work at times and has taken me ages to get through. Not sure I'll be doing another one before the end of the month.


message 30: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 265 comments I am reading several things, and beta reading something else. Plus writing and work I will try but not sure I will pitch into this month. I did read The War of the Worlds recently.


message 31: by Gemma (last edited Sep 07, 2013 11:28PM) (new)

Gemma Birt (gemmaloubirt) | 65 comments I finished Treasure Island late yesterday. Really not my thing but I can see the attraction for others. Moving on to Silas Marner :-)


message 32: by Andrew (new)

Andrew | 1010 comments Gritted teeth and definitely out of my comfort zone as its the anniversary I have started Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and so far so good!


message 33: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Andrew wrote: "Gritted teeth and definitely out of my comfort zone as its the anniversary I have startedPride and Prejudice by Jane Austenand so far so good!"

lol...your a better man than me! I have to tackle several Jane Austens for another challenge and have been putting it off - I suspect they will be the only books left on the list for me to read.


message 34: by Philip (new)

Philip Dodd (philipdodd) | 55 comments I plan to read The Mystery of Edwin Drood by Charles Dickens before the end of September. Sadly, he left it unfinished. It is one of the few of his books that I have yet to read. As ever, the book reveals his great gift for inventing names, such as Septimus Crisparkle, Edwin Drood, Luke Honeythunder, Neville Landless and Thomas Sapsea.
The Mystery of Edwin Drood by Charles Dickens


message 35: by Kate, Moderator (new)

Kate | 1328 comments Mod
Charles Dickens certainly does invent some great names. I've come across Toby Crackit (an accomplice of Bill Sikes) while I'm reading Oliver Twist.


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3622 comments Trawled through The Three Musketeers - got really boring!


message 37: by Kate, Moderator (new)

Kate | 1328 comments Mod
Lynne - The Book Squirrel wrote: "Trawled through The Three Musketeers - got really boring!"

Oh no! I've got that lined up for the 17th Century in the time traveller challenge. Should I ditch it and find an alternative???


message 38: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 265 comments I couldn't get that far through 3 musketeers either.


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3622 comments A.L. wrote: "I couldn't get that far through 3 musketeers either."

So glad it wasn't just me!


message 40: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 265 comments Lol. No it wasn't just you.


message 41: by Liz, Moderator (new)

Liz | 3425 comments Mod
I read 'The Three Musketeers' quite a long while ago and I remember enjoying it. I agree, it's not exactly a 'page-turner' and the language means it takes a little while to get used to, but I liked it....


message 42: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 265 comments I might try again. I found my poor over-loved copy of The Count of Monte Cristo the other day so that might be read again soon.


message 43: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Finished The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells by H.G. Wells. Really enjoyed it.


message 44: by Deanne (new)

Deanne | 684 comments Reading a Conneticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Twain. What I'm really doing is listening to my kindle as I walk around Attenborough.


message 45: by Susan (new)

Susan Ian wrote: "Finished The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells by H.G. Wells. Really enjoyed it."

I remember the first time I read this as a teenager it gave me nightmares....
It's a great story which I've now read several times, and always loved it.


message 46: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Terrible film, but at least I now understand why the Martians were depicted as tentacled bits of blubber by Spielberg.


message 47: by Danielle (new)

Danielle (daniellecobbaertbe) | 371 comments I would like to read The Count of Monte Cristo - but it will be for the coming months I'm afraid.


message 48: by Bill (new)

Bill | 2714 comments I have this feeling I won't be finished Daniel Deronda byu the end of the month, but I am enjoying... even though I don't particularly like Gwendolyn... Mind you, I don't particularly like Grandcourt either.. lol However, I do like the style, the intelligence and the story.


message 49: by Kate, Moderator (new)

Kate | 1328 comments Mod
I'm struggling a bit with Oliver Twist. Not sure I'll get it finished in time although I shall persevere.


message 50: by Liz, Moderator (last edited Sep 24, 2013 06:33PM) (new)

Liz | 3425 comments Mod
Bill wrote: "I have this feeling I won't be finished Daniel Deronda by the end of the month, but I am enjoying... "
Trojanhorse wrote: "I'm struggling a bit with Oliver Twist. Not sure I'll get it finished in time although I shall persevere..."

Sounds as if we're all in the same boat; I have a long way still to go with Anna Karenina...
I suppose it's called the genre 'challenge' for a reason!
(And despite the struggle, I am enjoying it!)


« previous 1
back to top