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message 1: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Uminsky (benjaminu) | 357 comments Gone the way of the Dodo... like so many small presses


message 2: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I figured NSB had been having a hard time for years. They were the only publisher other than the DOA Arkham House that was delaying releases and turning announced books over to other publishers. I see the Skyhorse imprint is in the new Laird Barron book.

I prepaid for the William Hope Hodgson set and it literally took years for them to release all the volumes, so long that people began asking for their money back. Lassen always had some excuse about editing delays.

Their website went kaput for some time last year and they had all the signs of going belly up: missed deadlines, malfunctioning website, pulling announced books, poor customer service. I'm not sure what this Skyhorse outfit is all about but acquisition by a bigger company is often a mixed blessing for the book lover.


message 3: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I just got another new book from NightShade and it has the ubiquitous sticker on the back. Does anyone know if this is put on by a distributor, Amazon, or NightShade itself? Every NS book I have ever bought other than in a book store has this sticker on it. It is barely possible to get it off of a dj but almost impossible if it is stuck on the book itself unless it is a cloth bound book.


message 4: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Uminsky (benjaminu) | 357 comments Hmm... is there a nifty way of dealing with that? I have thought about possibly using steam to loosen up the sticker glue.

I have a few books that have an ex-libris book plate that I really want to remove. Haven't tried it yet, though.

Anyone have any thoughts or experience with this?


message 5: by Scott (new)

Scott I use Goo Gone to get stickers of things like CD cases but I'd be careful about book covers. If the cover has a glossy finish it might take some of that off as well.

What does this sticker say, exactly? None of my NSB have one.


message 6: by Randolph, Randy (last edited Jan 28, 2014 10:19AM) (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Scott wrote: "I use Goo Gone to get stickers of things like CD cases but I'd be careful about book covers. If the cover has a glossy finish it might take some of that off as well.

What does this sticker say, e..."


It's usually a barcode and a retail price. My Jorkens, William Hope Hodgson, Clark Ashton Smith, and various other hardcovers all have them. On the dj where there is one and right on the book for the ones that come without a dj like the Hodgson. I hate it. and I never know if I'm going to get one, but I usually do.


message 7: by Scott (new)

Scott If it doesn't cover anything up (or just another barcode) I would just leave it.


message 8: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Uminsky (benjaminu) | 357 comments But it is so ugly...
; )


message 9: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Benjamin wrote: "But it is so ugly...
; )"


And I'm sure it affects the value of the op titles.


message 10: by Frances (new)

Frances I've always managed by slowly peeling off as much as I can (I've never steamed a book, but humid days do seem to help), and then using rubbing alcohol to get off the left-behind gunk and skin of shredded paper. It's never hurt the cover IME, though I am guessing you would want to try to patch test on a very small spot. (Possibly with the end of a Q-tip?)


message 11: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Frances wrote: "I've always managed by slowly peeling off as much as I can (I've never steamed a book, but humid days do seem to help), and then using rubbing alcohol to get off the left-behind gunk and skin of sh..."

Thanks, on the Jorkens and Hodgson I'll try it where the cover fascia turns over onto the inner paper piece (I wish I knew book collector terms better). I've had some bad experiences removing adhesive from things. I once had a satellite radio that I repositioned in my car and when I tried some solvent to get the adhesive off (it was super-aggressive so it could stand the heat in your car without creeping, so rubbing alcohol would not work). All the paint came off my dashboard. I had assumed it was molded that color, but it was actually a painted piece. I've learned my lesson to try a small amount on an inconspicuous place.


message 12: by Canavan (last edited Feb 10, 2014 04:49PM) (new)

Canavan Ellen Datlow posted on another site the table of contents for her upcoming annual horror anthology (this will the sixth in the series) to be published by Night Shade Books, so I thought I would pass it along to any who might be interested.

1. “Apports” by Stephen Bacon (Black Static #36)
2. “Mr. Splitfoot” by Dale Bailey (Queen Victoria’s Book of Spells)
3. “The Good Husbandv” by Nathan Ballingrud (North American Lake Monsters)
4. “The Tiger” by Nina Allan (Terror Tales of London)
5. “The House on Cobb Street” by Linda E. Rucker (Nightmare #9 June)
6. “The Soul in the Bell Jar” by KJ Kabza (F&SF November/Dec)
7. “Call Out” by Stephen Toase (Innsmouth Magazine #12)
8. “That Tiny Flutter of the Heart I Used to Call Love” by Robert Shearman (Psycho-Mania)
9. “Bones of Crow” by Ray Cluley (Black Static #37)
10. “Introduction to the Body in Fairy Tales” by Jeannine Hall Gailey (Phantom Drift #3)
11. “The Fox” by Conrad Williams (This is Horror chapbook)
12. “The Tin House” by Simon Clark (Shadow Masters)
13. “Stemming the Tide” by Simon Strantzas (Dead North)
14. “The Anatomist’s Mnemonic” by Priya Sharma (Black Static #32.)
15. “The Monster Makers” by Steve Rasnic Tem (Black Static #35)
16. “The Only Ending We Have” by Kim Newman (Psycho-Mania)
17. “The Dog’s Paw” by Derek Künsken (Chilling Tales: In Words, Alas, Drown I)
18. “Fine in the Fire” by Lee Thomas (Like Light For Flies)
19. “Majorlena” by Jane Jakeman (Supernatural Tales 24)
20. “The Withering” by Tim Casson (Black Static 32)
21. “Down to a Sunless Sea” by Neil Gaiman (The Guardian.com)
22. “Jaws of Saturn” by Laird Barron (The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All)
23. “Halfway Home” by Linda Nagata (Nightmare #12)
24. “The Same Deep Waters as You” by Brian Hodge (Weirder Shadows Over Innsmouth)


message 13: by Scott (new)

Scott The first two of those were disappointing. I already have the third one, but I don't know if I'm going to bother with any more.


message 14: by Canavan (new)

Canavan Scott wrote:

The first two of those were disappointing. I already have the third one, but I don't know if I'm going to bother with any more.

I suppose I'd respectfully disagree. I've just finished the first and I’ve sampled stories from Volumes 2-5. I find Datlow’s taste in fiction to be fairly similar to my own — or at least similar enough to make her selections worth reading.


message 15: by Scott (new)

Scott I'd agree about most of the other anthologies she's put together, but I just haven't liked these as much. She seems to keep using the same authors and sources, and I wonder if the small presses don't give her as much latitude.


message 16: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I've also been disappointed by these "Best of" annuals whether edited by Datlow, Guran, or Jones. I'll probably buy this one just for the Dale Bailey story. I find the annual summary and the Necrologies to be the most fun parts of these. I rarely (never?) end up rating these more than 3-stars because the amount of filler overwhelms the great stories.

Completely off topic, does anyone else notice that the non-American writers generally seem to be doing all the heavy lifting in horror these days?


message 17: by Gregor (new)

Gregor Xane (gregorxane) | 22 comments Randolph wrote: "Completely off topic, does anyone else notice that the non-American writers generally seem to be doing all the heavy lifting in horror these days?"

Examples? (I need to fill out my TBR list.)


message 18: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I hope Night Shade gets it/keeps it together under the new ownership. I have really enjoyed a lot of stuff from them in the past.


message 19: by Canavan (last edited Feb 12, 2014 08:40AM) (new)

Canavan Randolph wrote:

I hope Night Shade gets it/keeps it together under the new ownership. I have really enjoyed a lot of stuff from them in the past.

Yeah. I hope so, too.

Just to add a random thought here — I was just looking at Jarred Weisfeld’s latest newsletter from NSB this morning. The newsletter describes the imprint as a publisher of science fiction and fantasy. Even before last year’s financial and corporate shake-up, I had noted the growing number of sci-fi titles in the publisher’s catalog. This trend seems to have really accelerated in the last year or so. Nothing wrong with sci-fi, of course, but I miss the sort of titles that typified the publisher’s early years.


message 20: by Canavan (new)

Canavan Scott wrote:

I'd agree about most of the other anthologies she's put together, but I just haven't liked these [annuals] as much. She seems to keep using the same authors and sources, and I wonder if the small presses don't give her as much latitude.

I'm not arguing that you ought to like Ellen Datlow's annuals, Scott. I would, however, note that I have on numerous occasions listened to Datlow talk about the editorial process she has followed in making her selections and I imagine she would take umbrage at the notion that there has ever been any editorial interference from higher-ups (either at SMP or NSB) as regards her choices. For better or worse, the choices are reflective of her tastes and biases.

Randolph wrote (in part):

I've also been disappointed by these "Best of" annuals whether edited by Datlow, Guran, or Jones. I'll probably buy this one just for the Dale Bailey story. I find the annual summary and the Necrologies to be the most fun parts of these. I rarely (never?) end up rating these more than 3-stars because the amount of filler overwhelms the great stories.

Perhaps I have a somewhat different perspective on anthologies (or even single-author story collections) than you do, Randolph. When assigning a personal rating to such works I adopt a rather straightforward "structuralist" rather than "gestalt" approach. In other words, I judge a story collection to be nothing more or less than the mean value of its components (stories). And since in my experience no (or at rate extremely few) story collections don't have at least some low-rated entries, I almost never end up awarding the collection as a whole more than 4 stars (3 is more typical). Doesn't mean that the low-ranked stories are necessarily badly written — it may simply mean their themes or style weren't to my taste. As a corollary, I tend not to judge as a failure a collection that I assign 4 (or even 3) stars. Sometimes the presence of a handful a real gems allows me to consider such a collection a success despite the presence of what you refer to as "filler".


message 21: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Canavan wrote: "Scott wrote:


I'd agree about most of the other anthologies she's put together, but I just haven't liked these [annuals] as much. She seems to keep using the same authors and sources, and I wond..."


Yes, but they waste my time reading them since I'm compulsive about finishing everything I start much to my detriment at times. As far as I know I've never not finished a book, even textbooks in college I would compulsively finish. Unless I think a book has the clear potential to be four stars before I start it I generally won't begin it, the only other case where I break this rule is when I'm studying an author's work and try to read most everything by them. I've been too disappointed by the last Jones and Datlow annuals to start another one or buy any new ones. I gave up on Guran's annuals awhile ago. Just my personal quirks and preferences. I'm not a particularly fast reader and I don't have that many years left to read, probably fewer than you, so I try to maximize my "quality" reading.

My next anthology will be Strange Tales Volume IV since I haven't been disappointed with the previous three offerings.

I do appreciate your perspective and it probably is more logical than mine. I can certainly see your point of view.

I have a Datlow non-annual on the way that I got involved with through a Kickstarter. Of the three major annuals I would rate her's as the most in line with my tastes and the least full of "filler."


message 22: by Canavan (new)

Canavan Randolph wrote (in part):

As far as I know I've never not finished a book, even textbooks in college I would compulsively finish. Unless I think a book has the clear potential to be four stars before I start it I generally won't begin it…

I could probably benefit from a bit of that compulsive attitude. It can take me years (or even decades!) to finish a story collection. (I started the first of Ellen Datlow's NSB annuals back in 2011 and only recently completed it.) It’s one of the reasons I started a log enumerating my short story reads — i.e., I would too often find myself in the middle of a story only to realize it was one I had read before.

I have a Datlow non-annual on the way that I got involved with through a Kickstarter.

That would be Fearful Symmetries, right? I’m looking forward to that one.


message 23: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Canavan wrote: "Randolph wrote (in part):


As far as I know I've never not finished a book, even textbooks in college I would compulsively finish. Unless I think a book has the clear potential to be four stars..."


Fearful Symmetries is correct. I already received some swag from this Kickstarter but other than a couple of e-books from Chi-Zine (I think that is correct) I cannot remember what else. I did not opt for a review of my manuscript by Ellen (as if I had one)!

Re: compulsive attitude, I have had some false starts but I keep track of these as well. It took me three starts, beginning in high school (and that was a long time ago), to get into Gravity's Rainbow. I was just not mature enough for it when I first started it. It has taken me years, decades, to finish some things. I'm caught up now though.

I should keep a list of stories. In the Oliver collection for this month I realized I had already read two of the stories. I keep reading the same stories by Laird Barron 3 or 4 times it seems.

I think your approach to stories is the more fruitful one. Stories should be savored in bites not gulped down in bunches. I think I miss the reflective aspect of reading many stories and horror relies on the shorter forms.


message 24: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 124 comments I've just finished Datlow's The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Six and thought it was much better than any of her previous ones. By and large, up until Volume Six, I've been really disappointed.


message 25: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 124 comments Jodi wrote: "I should keep a list. That's a good idea."

I am just geeky enough that I already do that.


message 26: by Scott (new)

Scott Nancy wrote: "I've just finished Datlow's The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Six and thought it was much better than any of her previous ones. By and large, up until Volume Six, I've been really..."

That's good to know. I felt the same way about the first two. I've already got the third but maybe I'll jump ahead to this one. (Has it already been six years??)


message 27: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 124 comments Scott wrote: "Nancy wrote: "I've just finished Datlow's The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Six and thought it was much better than any of her previous ones. By and large, up until Volume Six, I'..."

I haven't been positive about any of them until this one. But then again, horror is definitely in the eye of the beholder.


message 28: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Nancy wrote: "Scott wrote: "Nancy wrote: "I've just finished Datlow's The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Six and thought it was much better than any of her previous ones. By and large, up until ..."

The ones up until now have certainly stretched the "Best" adjective. I've thought the Jones "Mammoth" anthologies were somewhat better but still far below the "Best" overall.


message 29: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments A recent email I got from Night Shade Books says:

BEST HORROR OF THE YEAR VOLUME 1 BY ELLEN DATLOW IS AVAILABLE FOR $1.99 ON AMAZON AND BARNES & NOBLE!


message 30: by Randolph, Randy (last edited Mar 17, 2015 02:53PM) (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Ronald wrote: "A recent email I got from Night Shade Books says:

BEST HORROR OF THE YEAR VOLUME 1 BY ELLEN DATLOW IS AVAILABLE FOR $1.99 ON AMAZON AND BARNES & NOBLE!"


I checked on Amazon and only volume 2 was on fire sale for $1.99, at least right now. Same on B&N.


message 31: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Yeah, the link Night Shade Books gives is for the ebook version of Volume 2. Hopefully, they will send an email clarification.


message 32: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

THE BOOK OF CTHULHU 2 BY ROSS LOCKHART IS AVAILABLE FOR $1.99 ON AMAZON, BARNES AND NOBLE, AND MORE!


message 33: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

THE BEST HORROR OF THE YEAR, VOLUME 3 BY ELLEN DATLOW IS AVAILABLE FOR $1.99 ON AMAZON, BARNES & NOBLE, & MORE!


message 34: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

The Best Horror of the Year (The Best Horror of the Year Series Book 6) by Ellen Datlow Is Available Now for $1.99!


message 35: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All by Laird Barron is Available Now for $1.99!


message 36: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Seven is Available for $1.99!


message 37: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

The Best Horror of the Year Volume 9 by Ellen Datlow is Available for $1.99!


message 38: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I’ve never been a huge Jules de Grandin fan, but Seabury Quinn was Weird Tales most published author. Anyway NSB is issuing all Quinn’s Jules de Grandin stories, 90+, in nice editions. I’ve have always thought The Horror on the Links one of the most hilarious titles for a short story. Lends new meaning to water hazard and sand trap. I would like to see NSB reissue the Manly Wade Wellman and Jorkens omnibuses.


message 39: by Scott (new)

Scott Randolph wrote: "I’ve have always thought The Horror on the Links one of the most hilarious titles for a short story."

My vote goes to "The Lurking Duck."


message 40: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Six is Available for $1.99!


message 41: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night ShadeBooks:

The Best Horror of the Year Volume 10 is Available for $1.99!


message 42: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

Best Horror of the Year Volume 8
is Available for $1.99!


message 43: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent email from Night Shade Books:

The Best of the Best Horror of the Year
is Available for $1.99!


message 44: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent notification from Night Shade Books:

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.c...


message 45: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Recent notification from Night Shade Books:

The Best Horror of the Year Volume 13

by Ellen Datlow

Available Now!
From Ellen Datlow (“the venerable queen of horror anthologies” (New York Times) comes a new entry in the series that has brought you stories from Stephen King and Neil Gaiman comes thrilling stories, the best horror stories available.

For more than four decades, Ellen Datlow has been at the center of horror. Bringing you the most frightening and terrifying stories, Datlow always has her finger on the pulse of what horror readers crave. Now, with the thirteenth volume of the series, Datlow is back again to bring you the stories that will keep you up at night.

Encompassed in the pages of The Best Horror of the Year have been such illustrious writers as: Neil Gaiman, Stephen King, Stephen Graham Jones, Joyce Carol Oates, Laird Barron, Mira Grant, and many others.

With each passing year, science, technology, and the march of time shine light into the craggy corners of the universe, making the fears of an earlier generation seem quaint. But this light creates its own shadows. The Best Horror of the Year chronicles these shifting shadows. It is a catalog of terror, fear, and unpleasantness as articulated by today’s most challenging and exciting writers.


message 46: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I just realized “lassen” means slow in German. I should never bitched about the Hodgson set. I was forewarned.

BTW, NSB, while still technically alive, is a shadow of its former self.


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