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NATIVE AMERICANS > INDIAN WARS - WESTERN STATES

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Aug 30, 2013 11:39AM) (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
This is a thread to discuss Indian Wars - Western States. This thread can be used to discuss Custer, Sioux War, etc.

This thread was requested by Bryan Craig.


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
reserved


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
reserved


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
reserved


message 5: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Blue Water Creek and the First Sioux War, 1854-1856

Blue Water Creek and the First Sioux War, 1854-1856 by R. Eli Paul by Paul Beck (no photo)

Synopsis:

In previous accounts, the U.S. Army’s first clashes with the powerful Sioux tribe appear as a set of irrational events with a cast of improbable characters—a Mormon cow, a brash lieutenant, a drunken interpreter, an unfortunate Brulé chief, and an incorrigible army commander. R. Eli Paul shows instead that the events that precipitated General William Harney’s attack on Chief Little Thunder’s Brulé village foreshadowed the entire history of conflict between the United States and the Lakota people.

Today Blue Water Creek is merely one of many modest streams coursing through Sioux country. The conflicts along its margins have been overshadowed by later, more spectacular confrontations, including the Great Sioux War and George Custer’s untimely demise along another modest stream. The Blue Water legacy has gone largely underappreciated—until now. Blue Water Creek and the First Sioux War, 1854-1856 provides a thorough and objective narrative, using a wealth of eyewitness accounts to reveal the significance of Blue Water Creek in Lakota and U.S. history.


message 6: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Washita: The U.S. Army and the Southern Cheyennes, 1867-1869

Washita The U.S. Army and the Southern Cheyennes, 1867-1869 by Jerome A. Greene by Jerome A. Greene (no photo)

Synopsis:

On November 27, 1868, the U.S. Seventh Cavalry under Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer attacked a Southern Cheyenne village along the Washita River in present-day western Oklahoma. The subsequent U.S. victory signaled the end of the Cheyennes’ traditional way of life and resulted in the death of Black Kettle, their most prominent peace chief.

In this remarkably balanced history, Jerome A. Greene describes the causes, conduct, and consequences of the event even as he addresses the multiple controversies surrounding the conflict. As Greene explains, the engagement brought both praise and condemnation for Custer and carried long-range implications for his stunning defeat at the Battle of the Little Bighorn eight years later.


message 7: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Morning Start Dawn: The Powder River Expedition and the Northern Cheyennes, 1876

Morning Star Dawn The Powder River Expedition and the Northern Cheyennes, 1876 by Jerome A. Greene by Jerome A. Greene (no photo)

Synopsis:

From a recognized authority on the High Plains Indians wars comes this narrative history blending both American Indian and U.S. Army perspectives on the attack that destroyed the village of Northern Cheyenne chief Morning Star. Of momentous significance for the Cheyennes as well as the army, this November 1876 encounter, coming exactly six months to the day after the Custer debacle at the Little Bighorn, was part of the Powder River Expedition waged by Brigadier General George Crook against the Indians. Vital to the larger context of the Great Sioux War, the attack on Morning Star’s village encouraged the eventual surrender of Crazy Horse and his Sioux followers.

Unbiased in its delivery, Morning Star Dawn offers the most thorough modern scholarly assessment of the Powder River Expedition. It incorporates previously unsynthesized data from the National Archives, the Library of Congress, the U.S. Army Military History Institute, and other repositories, and provides an examination of all facets of the campaign leading to and following the destruction of Morning Star’s village.


message 8: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig The Buffalo Soldiers: A Narrative of the Black Cavalry in the West, Revised Edition

Buffalo Soldiers A Narrative of the Negro Cavalry in the West by William H. Leckie by William H. Leckie (no photo)

Synopsis:

Originally published in 1967, William H. Leckie’s The Buffalo Soldiers was the first book of its kind to recognize the importance of African American units in the conquest of the West. Decades later, with sales of more than 75,000 copies, The Buffalo Soldiers has become a classic. Now, in a newly revised edition, the authors have expanded the original research to explore more deeply the lives of buffalo soldiers in the Ninth and Tenth Cavalry Regiments.

Written in accessible prose that includes a synthesis of recent scholarship, this edition delves further into the life of an African American soldier in the nineteenth century. It also explores the experiences of soldiers’ families at frontier posts. In a new epilogue, the authors summarize developments in the lives of buffalo soldiers after the Indian Wars and discuss contemporary efforts to memorialize them in film, art, and architecture.


message 9: by happy (last edited Sep 02, 2013 08:29PM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 76 comments Here are a couple I would recommend.

Carbine and Lance: The Story of Old Ft. Sill

Carbine and Lance The Story of Old Fort Sill by Wilbur Sturtevant Nye by Wilbur Sturtevant Nye (no photo)

Synopsis:

This is the story of Old Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. It is a bit dated (written in the 1920's) but still an excellent read for the Army's fight with Comanche and Kiowa and other native tribes in Southern Oklahoma and Northern Texas.

On a personal note - this was the first "Grown up" history book I ever owned. I got it as a Christmas Present when I was 11 on the 100th anniversary of the founding of Ft. Sill. We were living at Ft. Sill at the time.

Frontier Regulars: The United States Army and the Indian: 1866-1891

Frontier Regulars The United States Army and the Indian, 1866-1891 by Robert M. Utley by Robert M. Utley Robert M. Utley

Synopsis:

Very good overview of the US Army's operations against the Indian tribes, post Civil War. Covers all the Indian Wars, plus a good look at the culture of the Indian fighting Army.


message 10: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great, happy, thanks so much.


message 11: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Son of the Morning Star: Custer and The Little Bighorn

Son of the Morning Star by Evan S. Connell by Evan S. Connell Evan S. Connell

Synopsis:

Custer's Last Stand is among the most enduring events in American history--more than one hundred years after the fact, books continue to be written and people continue to argue about even the most basic details surrounding the Little Bighorn. Evan S. Connell, whom Joyce Carol Oates has described as "one of our most interesting and intelligent American writers," wrote what continues to be the most reliable--and compulsively readable--account of the subject. Connell makes good use of his meticulous research and novelist's eye for the story and detail to re-vreate the heroism, foolishness, and savagery of this crucial chapter in the history of the West.

Mentioned:
Joyce Carol Oates Joyce Carol Oates


message 12: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn

The Last Stand Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn by Nathaniel Philbrick by Nathaniel Philbrick Nathaniel Philbrick

Synopsis:

The Last Stand is Philbrick's monumental reappraisal of the epochal clash at the Little Bighorn in 1876 that gave birth to the legend of Custer's Last Stand. Bringing a wealth of new information to his subject, as well as his characteristic literary flair, Philbrick details the collision between two American icons- George Armstrong Custer and Sitting Bull-that both parties wished to avoid, and brilliantly explains how the battle that ensued has been shaped and reshaped by national myth.


message 13: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig A Terrible Glory: Custer and the Little Bighorn - the Last Great Battle of the American West

A Terrible Glory Custer and the Little Bighorn - the Last Great Battle of the American West by James Donovan by James Donovan James Donovan

Synopsis:

In June of 1876, on a hill above a winding river called "the Little Bighorn," George Armstrong Custer and all 210 men under his direct command were annihilated by nearly 2,000 Sioux and Cheyenne. This devastating loss caused an uproar, and public figures pointed fingers in order to avoid responsibility. Custer, who was conveniently dead, took the brunt of the blame.

The truth, however, was far more complex. A TERRIBLE GLORY is the first book to relate the entire story of this endlessly fascinating battle, and the first to call upon all the vital new forensic research of the past quarter century. It is also the first book to bring to light the details of the army cover-up--and unravel one of the greatest mysteries in US military history.


message 14: by Becky (last edited Sep 03, 2013 02:31PM) (new)

Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1217 comments Thank you for this thread, Bryan!

I'd like to suggest:
The Comanche Empire

The Comanche Empire by Pekka Hämäläinen by Pekka Hämäläinen Pekka Hämäläinen

Synopsis:
Hämäläinen's hypothesis is that not only were the Comanches one of the most feared tribes on the Western plains, they were also the most economically ambitious arranging their allies into a trading empire as major competition with the Spanish, French, English, Mexican, American and other forces. They used their proficiency with horses to hunt buffalo as well as raid and trade (slaves and livestock) while they were still a basically nomadic people until the buffalo were over-hunted.


message 15: by happy (last edited Sep 07, 2013 04:31AM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 76 comments Bryan wrote: "A Terrible Glory: Custer and the Little Bighorn - the Last Great Battle of the American West

[bookcover:A Terrible Glory: Custer and the Little Bighorn - the Last Great Battle of the American West..."


FWIW, When my brother and I visited Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, hows that for a mouthful :), a couple of years ago, the Ranger who was giving the lecture on the battle said that in his opinion, Terrible Glory was the best book on the battle.

My thought after walking the ground - What a lonely place to die!

Even today the battlefield is in the middle of nowhere


message 16: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great to know, happy, I will add this to my TBR pile now.

Thanks for post, Becky.


message 17: by happy (last edited Feb 16, 2014 12:01AM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 76 comments Becky wrote: "Thank you for this thread, Bryan!

I'd like to suggest:
The Comanche Empire

The Comanche Empire by Pekka Hämäläinen by Pekka HämäläinenPekka Hämäläinen

Synopsis:
Hämäläinen's..."

This one goes on the TBR pile

Here is another pretty good look at the conflict between the Comanche and nearly everybody else.


Empire of the Summer Moon Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne by S.C. Gwynne (no photo)


Synopsis

Warning - this is not a politically correct view of the Comanche. Mr. Gwynne gives a protrayal of the Comanche and their last great Chief, Quanah Parker that while admiring does not sugar coat the conflict and the tactics used by both sides. He gives reasons why "Save the last bullet for yourself" was an axiom of Indian Wars. The story of the Comanche is interwoven with the more personal story of Quanah and his mother.


message 18: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Thanks happy, I heard very good things about Gwynne's book:

Empire of the Summer Moon Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne by S.C. Gwynne (no photo)


message 19: by Ken (new)

Ken Miller Bryan wrote: "Thanks happy, I heard very good things about Gwynne's book:

[bookcover:Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American H..."


I thoroughly enjoyed this book, so much so that I own it in hardback and as a Kindle book. I appreciated Gwynne's approach in relating the unusual life of Quannah Parker and the information provided about the Commanche culture.


message 20: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
An upcoming book:
Release date: October 9, 2013

Shooting Arrows and Slinging Mud: Custer, the Press, and the Little Bighorn

Shooting Arrows and Slinging Mud Custer, the Press, and the Little Bighorn by James E Mueller by James E Mueller (no photo)

Synopsis:

The defeat of George Armstrong Custer and the Seventh Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn was big news in 1876. Newspaper coverage of the battle initiated hot debates about whether the U.S. government should change its policy toward American Indians and who was to blame for the army’s loss—the latter, an argument that ignites passion to this day. In Shooting Arrows and Slinging Mud, James E. Mueller draws on exhaustive research of period newspapers to explore press coverage of the famous battle. As he analyzes a wide range of accounts—some grim, some circumspect, some even laced with humor—Mueller offers a unique take on the dramatic events that so shook the American public.

Among the many myths surrounding the Little Bighorn is that journalists of that time were incompetent hacks who, in response to the stunning news of Custer’s defeat, called for bloodthirsty revenge against the Indians and portrayed the “boy general” as a glamorous hero who had suffered a martyr’s death. Mueller argues otherwise, explaining that the journalists of 1876 were not uniformly biased against the Indians, and they did a credible job of describing the battle. They reported facts as they knew them, wrote thoughtful editorials, and asked important questions.

Although not without their biases, journalists reporting on the Battle of the Little Bighorn cannot be credited—or faulted—for creating the legend of Custer’s Last Stand. Indeed, as Mueller reveals, after the initial burst of attention, these journalists quickly moved on to other stories of their day. It would be art and popular culture—biographies, paintings, Wild West shows, novels, and movies—that would forever embed the Last Stand in the American psyche.


message 21: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
This thread is actually doing quite well - I am glad that Bryan suggested it. Thanks to all contributors.


message 22: by happy (last edited Sep 20, 2013 01:07AM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 76 comments Here is another one in my personal library

Crazy Horse and Custer

Crazy Horse and Custer by Stephen E. Ambrose by Stephen E. Ambrose

Synopsis:

This is an early work by Dr. Ambrose. While telling the story of the Little Bighorn, he compares the lives the two main leaders at the Battle and how they got there. There are some amazing paralells in their lives.


message 23: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Nice, happy, thank you.


message 24: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
Another:

Deliverance from the Little Big Horn: Doctor Henry Porter and Custer's Seventh Cavalry

Deliverance from the Little Big Horn Doctor Henry Porter and Custer's Seventh Cavalry by Joan Nabseth Stevenson by Joan Nabseth Stevenson (no photo)

Synopsis:

Of the three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s Seventh Cavalry on June 25, 1876, only the youngest, twenty-eight-year-old Henry Porter, survived that day’s ordeal, riding through a gauntlet of Indian attackers and up the steep bluffs to Major Marcus Reno’s hilltop position. But the story of Dr. Porter’s wartime exploits goes far beyond the battle itself. In this compelling narrative of military endurance and medical ingenuity, Joan Nabseth Stevenson opens a new window on the Battle of the Little Big Horn by re-creating the desperate struggle for survival during the fight and in its wake.

As Stevenson recounts in gripping detail, Porter’s life-saving work on the battlefield began immediately, as he assumed the care of nearly sixty soldiers and two Indian scouts, attending to wounds and performing surgeries and amputations. He evacuated the critically wounded soldiers on mules and hand litters, embarking on a hazardous trek of fifteen miles that required two river crossings, the scaling of a steep cliff, and a treacherous descent into the safety of the steamboat Far West, waiting at the mouth of the Little Big Horn River. There began a harrowing 700-mile journey along the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers to the post hospital at Fort Abraham Lincoln near Bismarck, Dakota Territory.

With its new insights into the role and function of the army medical corps and the evolution of battlefield medicine, this unusual book will take its place both as a contribution to the history of the Great Sioux War and alongside such vivid historical novels as Son of the Morning Star and Little Big Man. It will also ensure that the selfless deeds of a lone "contract” surgeon—unrecognized to this day by the U.S. government—will never be forgotten.


message 25: by Christy (last edited Oct 14, 2013 09:52AM) (new)

Christy | 17 comments The Killing of Crazy Horse by Thomas Powers

The Killing of Crazy Horse by Thomas Powers by Thomas Powers (no photo)

Synopsis:

He was the greatest Indian warrior of the nineteenth century. His victory over General Custer at the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 was the worst defeat inflicted on the frontier Army. And the death of Crazy Horse in federal custody has remained a controversy for more than a century.

The Killing of Crazy Horse pieces together the many sources of fear and misunderstanding that resulted in an official killing hard to distinguish from a crime. A rich cast of characters, whites and Indians alike, passes through this story, including Red Cloud, the chief who dominated Oglala history for fifty years but saw in Crazy Horse a dangerous rival; No Water and Woman Dress, both of whom hated Crazy Horse and schemed against him; the young interpreter Billy Garnett, son of a fifteen-year-old Oglala woman and a Confederate general killed at Gettysburg; General George Crook, who bitterly resented newspaper reports that he had been whipped by Crazy Horse in battle; Little Big Man, who betrayed Crazy Horse; Lieutenant William Philo Clark, the smart West Point graduate who thought he could “work” Indians to do the Army’s bidding; and Fast Thunder, who called Crazy Horse cousin, held him the moment he was stabbed, and then told his grandson thirty years later, “They tricked me! They tricked me!”

At the center of the story is Crazy Horse himself, the warrior of few words whom the Crow said they knew best among the Sioux, because he always came closest to them in battle. No photograph of him exists today.

The death of Crazy Horse was a traumatic event not only in Sioux but also in American history. With the Great Sioux War as background and context, drawing on many new materials as well as documents in libraries and archives, Thomas Powers recounts the final months and days of Crazy Horse’s life not to lay blame but to establish what happened.


message 26: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Thanks Christy, nice job on citations. Just add parenthesis around no photo like so:

(no photo)


message 27: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
An upcoming book one of the more horrific episodes of the wars:
Release date: May 22, 2014

American Carnage: Wounded Knee, 1890

American Carnage Wounded Knee, 1890 by Jerome A Greene by Jerome A Greene (no photo)

Synopsis:

As the year 1890 wound to a close, a band of more than three hundred Lakota Sioux Indians led by Chief Big Foot made their way toward South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation to join other Lakotas seeking peace. Fearing that Big Foot’s band was headed instead to join “hostile” Lakotas, U.S. troops surrounded the group on Wounded Knee Creek. Tensions mounted, and on the morning of December 29, as the Lakotas prepared to give up their arms, disaster struck. Accounts vary on what triggered the violence as Indians and soldiers unleashed thunderous gunfire at each other, but the consequences were horrific: some 200 innocent Lakota men, women, and children were slaughtered. American Carnage—the first comprehensive account of Wounded Knee to appear in more than fifty years—explores the complex events preceding the tragedy, the killings, and their troubled legacy.

In this gripping tale, Jerome A. Greene—renowned specialist on the Indian wars—explores why the bloody engagement happened and demonstrates how it became a brutal massacre. Drawing on a wealth of sources, including previously unknown testimonies, Greene examines the events from both Native and non-Native perspectives, explaining the significance of treaties, white settlement, political disputes, and the Ghost Dance as influential factors in what eventually took place. He addresses controversial questions: Was the action premeditated? Was the Seventh Cavalry motivated by revenge after its humiliating defeat at the Battle of the Little Bighorn? Should soldiers have received Medals of Honor? He also recounts the futile efforts of Lakota survivors and their descendants to gain recognition for their terrible losses.

Epic in scope and poignant in its recounting of human suffering, American Carnage presents the reality—and denial—of our nation’s last frontier massacre. It will leave an indelible mark on our understanding of American history.


message 28: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig A classic:

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee An Indian History of the American West by Dee Brown by Dee Brown Dee Brown

Synopsis:

Immediately recognized as a revelatory and enormously controversial book since its first publication in 1971, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is universally recognized as one of those rare books that forever changes the way its subject is perceived.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is Dee Brown’s classic, eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold over four million copies in multiple editions and has been translated into seventeen languages.

Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the series of battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them and their people demoralized and decimated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was won, and lost. It tells a story that should not be forgotten, and so must be retold from time to time.


message 29: by Joao (new)

Joao Pinto | 4 comments For a first account of captivity among the indians I would recomend "9 years among the indians - 1870-1879" by Herman Lehmann (University of New MexicoPress).


message 30: by Bryan (last edited Mar 07, 2014 01:58PM) (new)

Bryan Craig Great, don't forget to use the "add book/author" feature to create book citations, so people can click:

Nine Years Among the Indians, 1870-1879 The Story of the Captivity and Life of a Texan Among the Indians by Herman Lehmann by Herman Lehmann (no photo)


message 31: by Joao (new)

Joao Pinto | 4 comments Thanks. Aparently that function does not work from a Tablet (or I am missing something...).


message 32: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Joaodpinto wrote: "Thanks. Aparently that function does not work from a Tablet (or I am missing something...)."

Hmmm....possible, but if you are using the Goodreads app, it won't work. You need to go to the full website.


message 33: by Joao (new)

Joao Pinto | 4 comments Ok, understood. I am In fact using the App. Thanks.


message 34: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
Dragoons in Apacheland: Conquest and Resistance in Southern New Mexico, 1846-1861

Dragoons in Apacheland Conquest and Resistance in Southern New Mexico, 1846-1861 by William S. Kiser by William S. Kiser (no photo)

Synopsis:

In the fifteen years prior to the American Civil War, the U.S. Army established a presence in southern New Mexico, the homeland of Mescalero, Mimbres, and Mogollon bands of the Apache Indians. From the army’s perspective, the Apaches presented an obstacle to be overcome in making the region—newly acquired in the Mexican-American War—safe for Anglo settlers. In Dragoons in Apacheland, William S. Kiser recounts the conflicts that ensued and examines how both Apache warriors and American troops shaped the future of the Southwest Borderlands.

Kiser narrates two distinct contests. The Apaches were defending their territory against the encroachment of soldiers and settlers. At the same time, the Anglo-Americans maneuvered against one another in a competition for political and economic power and for Apache territory. Cross-cultural misunderstandings, political corruption in Santa Fe and Washington, anti-Indian racism, troublemakers among both Apaches and settlers, irresponsible army officers and troops, corrupt American and Mexican traders, and policy disagreements among government officials all contributed to the ongoing hostilities. Kiser examines the behaviors and motivations of individuals involved in all aspects of these local, regional, and national disputes.

Kiser is one of only a few historians to deal with this crucial period in Indian-white relations in the Southwest—and the first to detail the experiences of the First and Second United States Dragoons, elite mounted troops better equipped and trained than infantry to confront Apache guerrilla warriors more accustomed to the southwestern environment. Often led by the Gila leader Mangas Coloradas, the Apaches fought desperately to protect their lands and way of life. The Americans, Kiser shows, used unauthorized tactics of total warfare, encouraging field units to attack villages and destroy crops and livestock, particularly when the Apaches refused to engage the troops in pitched battles.

Kiser’s insights into the pre–Civil War conflicts in southern New Mexico are essential to a deeper understanding of the larger U.S.-Apache war that culminated in the heroic resistance of Cochise, Victorio, and Geronimo.


message 35: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
An upcoming biography of Custer:
Release date: June 23, 2014

The Real Custer: From Boy General to Tragic Hero

The Real Custer From Boy General to Tragic Hero by James S Robbins by James S Robbins (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Real Custer takes a good hard look at the life and storied military career of George Armstrong Custer—from cutting his teeth at Bull Run in the Civil War, to his famous and untimely death at Little Bighorn in the Indian Wars.

Author James Robbins demonstrates that Custer, having graduated last in his class at West Point, went on to prove himself again and again as an extremely skilled cavalry leader. Robbins argues that Custer's undoing was his bold and cocky attitude, which caused the Army's bloodiest defeat in the Indian Wars.

Robbins also dives into Custer’s personal life, exploring his letters and other personal documents to reveal who he was as a person, underneath the military leader. The Real Custer is an exciting and valuable contribution to the legend and history of Custer that will delight Custer fans as well as readers new to the legend.


message 36: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Very good Jerome.


message 37: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
The First Sioux War: The Grattan Fight and Blue Water Creek 1854-1856

The First Sioux War The Grattan Fight and Blue Water Creek 1854-1856 by Paul N. Beck by Paul N. Beck (no photo)

Synopsis:

The First Sioux War was a vitally important conflict that helped define Lakota Sioux / white relations; created a closer national unity among the Sioux; and allowed the United States Army to develop new military tactics, which would eventually be used to defeat the Plains Indians. The war influenced future Sioux leaders like Crazy Horse, Spotted Tail, and Sitting Bull. Fought between two expanding peoples, the Sioux and the Americans, the First Sioux War produced two engagements, both worthy of study the Grattan Fight and Blue Water Creek. The Grattan Fight, a debacle for the army, caused heated debate in Congress, fueled animosity between the army and Indian Bureau, and allowed Secretary of War Jefferson Davis to increase the size of the army. Blue Water Creek, a punitive expedition led by General William S. Harney, completely destroyed two Sioux villages. During the First Sioux War, Harney used new tactics that officers serving on the expedition would later use in the Civil and Indian wars. Stunned by their losses, the Sioux quickly sought peace, but they never forgot the catastrophic lessons learned. For the Sioux, the war helped define a unified response to further white encroachment after the Civil War.


message 38: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
Indian Wars: The Campaign for the American West

Indian Wars The Campaign for the American West by Bill Yenne by Bill Yenne Bill Yenne

Synopsis:

The Indian wars remain the most misunderstood campaign ever waged by the U. S. Army. From the first sustained skirmishes west of the Mississippi River in the 1850s to the sweeping clashes of hundreds of soldiers and warriors along the upper plains decades later, these wars consumed most of the active duty resources of the army for the greater part of the nineteenth century and resulted in the disruption of nearly all of the native cultures in the West.

Yet the popular understanding of the Indian wars is marred by stereotypes and misinformation as well as a tendency to view these individual wars, the battles against the Sioux, the Cheyenne, the Nez Perce, the Apache, and other groups as distinct incidents rather than parts of a single overarching campaign.

Dispelling notions that American Indians were simply attempting to stop encroachment on their homelands or that they shared common views on how to approach the Europeans, Bill Yenne explains in Indian Wars: The Campaign for the American West, that these wars, fought for more than five decades across a landscape the size of continental Europe, were part of a general long-term strategy by the U. S. Army to control the West as well as extensions of conflicts among native peoples that predated European contact. Complete with a general history of Indian and European relations from the earliest encounters to the opening of the west, and featuring legendary figures from both sides, including Crazy Horse, Chief Joseph, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, George Custer, Kit Carson, and George Crook, Indian Wars allows the reader to better understand the sequence of events that transformed the West and helped define the American temperament.


message 39: by happy (last edited May 20, 2014 01:16AM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 76 comments I stumbled on to this one in a local used bookstore. It isn't listed in Goodreads and neither is the author, so I'm not sure how to do the citation but,

Of Garryowen in Glory: The History of the 7th U.S. Cavalry by LTC Melbourne C. Chandler (no photo) -

Synopsis
This is the history probably the US Army's most famous (or infamous) regiment. It covers the time from when the regiment was formed in 1866 to its deactivation in 1957 when the Army went away from regiments as tactical organizations. It is literally a year by year history of the regiment. The first half of it covers the regiments activities in the Indian Wars, including the winter campaign of 1868/9 - the Battle of the Washita, Black Hills expeditions of 1873/4, the Battle of the Little Big Horn, the chase of the Chief Joseph in 1877 and Wounded Knee. The second half mainly covers the Regiments activities in WWII and Korea.

Not a great read, but a good reference, lots of good pictures - I would probably give it 3.75 stars round up to 4 for goodreads


message 40: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4308 comments Mod
Men of Color to Arms!: Black Soldiers, Indian Wars, and the Quest for Equality

Men of Color to Arms! Black Soldiers, Indian Wars, and the Quest for Equality by Elizabeth D. Leonard by Elizabeth D. Leonard (no photo)

Synopsis:

In 1863, at the height of the Civil War, Frederick Douglass promised African Americans that serving in the military offered a sure path to freedom. Once a black man became a soldier, Douglass declared, there is no power on earth or under the earth which can deny that he has earned the right to citizenship in the United States. More than 180,000 black men heeded his call to defend the Union only to find the path to equality would not be so straightforward.

In this sharply drawn history, Professor Elizabeth D. Leonard reveals the aspirations and achievements as well as the setbacks and disappointments of African American soldiers. Drawing on eye-opening firsthand accounts, she restores black soldiers to their place in the arc of American history, from the Civil War and its promise of freedom until the dawn of the 20th century and the full retrenchment of Jim Crow.

Along the way, Leonard offers a nuanced account of black soldiers involvement in the Indian Wars, their attempts to desegregate West Point and gain proper recognition for their service, and their experience of Reconstruction nationally, as blacks worked to secure their place in an ever-changing nation. With abundant primary research, enlivened by memorable characters and vivid descriptions of army life, Men of Color to Arms! is an illuminating portrait of a group of men whose contributions to American history need to be further recognized.


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Frontiersmen in Blue: The United States Army and the Indian, 1848-1865

Frontiersmen in Blue The United States Army and the Indian, 1848-1865 by Robert M. Utley by Robert M. Utley Robert M. Utley

Synopsis:

Frontiersmen in Blue is a comprehensive history of the achievements and failures of the United States Regular and Volunteer Armies that confronted the Indian tribes of the West in the two decades between the Mexican War and the close of the Civil War. Between 1848 and 1865 the men in blue fought nearly all of the western tribes. Robert Utley describes many of these skirmishes in consummate detail, including descriptions of garrison life that was sometimes agonizingly isolated, sometimes caught in the lightning moments of desperate battle.


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Columns of Vengeance: Soldiers, Sioux, and the Punitive Expeditions, 1863-1864

Columns of Vengeance Soldiers, Sioux, and the Punitive Expeditions, 1863�1864 by Paul N. Beck by Paul N. Beck (no photo)

Synopsis:

In summer 1862, Minnesotans found themselves fighting interconnected wars—the first against the rebellious Southern states, and the second an internal war against the Sioux. While the Civil War was more important to the future of the United States, the Dakota War of 1862 proved far more destructive to the people of Minnesota—both whites and American Indians. It led to U.S. military action against the Sioux, divided the Dakotas over whether to fight or not, and left hundreds of white settlers dead. In Columns of Vengeance, historian Paul N. Beck offers a reappraisal of the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864, the U.S. Army’s response to the Dakota War of 1862.

Whereas previous accounts have approached the Punitive Expeditions as a military campaign of the Indian Wars, Beck argues that the expeditions were also an extension of the Civil War. The strategy and tactics reflected those of the war in the East, and Civil War operations directly affected planning and logistics in the West. Beck also examines the devastating impact the expeditions had on the various bands and tribes of the Sioux. Whites viewed the expeditions as punishment—“columns of vengeance” sent against those Dakotas who had started the war in 1862—yet the majority of the Sioux the army encountered had little or nothing to do with the earlier uprising in Minnesota.

Rather than relying only on the official records of the commanding officers involved, Beck presents a much fuller picture of the conflict by consulting the letters, diaries, and personal accounts of the common soldiers who took part in the expeditions, as well as rare personal narratives from the Dakotas. Drawing on a wealth of firsthand accounts and linking the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864 to the overall Civil War experience, Columns of Vengeance offers fresh insight into an important chapter in the development of U.S. military operations against the Sioux.


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The Deadliest Indian War in the West: The Snake Conflict, 1864-1868

The Deadliest Indian War in the West The Snake Conflict, 1864-1868 by Gregory Michno by Gregory Michno

Synopsis:

Gregroy Michno, author of several critically acclaimed books on America's Indian wars, gives readers the first comprehensive look at the natives, soldiers and settlers who clashed on the high desert of Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Oregon and Northern California in a struggle that, over a four-year period, claimed more lives than any other western Indian war.


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Forty Miles a Day on Beans and Hay: The Enlisted Soldier Fighting the Indian Wars

Forty Miles a Day on Beans and Hay The Enlisted Soldier Fighting the Indian Wars by Don Rickey by Don Rickey (no photo)

Synopsis:

The enlisted men in the United States Army during the Indian Wars (1866-91) need no longer be mere shadows behind their historically well-documented commanding officers.

As member of the regular army, these men formed an important segment of our usually slighted national military continuum and, through their labors, combats, and endurance, created the framework of law and order within which settlement and development become possible. We should know more about the common soldier in our military past, and here he is.

The rank and file regular, then as now, was psychologically as well as physically isolated from most of his fellow Americans. The people were tired of the military and its connotations after four years of civil war. They arrayed their army between themselves and the Indians, paid its soldiers their pittance, and went about the business of mushrooming the nation’s economy.

Because few enlisted men were literarily inclined, many barely able to scribble their names, most previous writings about them have been what officers and others had to say. To find out what the average soldier of the post-Civil War frontier thought, Don Rickey, Jr., asked over three hundred living veterans to supply information about their army experiences by answering questionnaires and writing personal accounts. Many of them who had survived to the mid-1950’s contributed much more through additional correspondence and personal interviews.

Whether the soldier is speaking for himself or through the author in his role as commentator-historian, this is the first documented account of the mass personality of the rank and file during the Indian Wars, and is only incidentally a history of those campaigns.


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An upcoming book:
Release date: February 10, 2015

Thieves' Road: The Black Hills Betrayal and Custer's Path to Little Bighorn

Thieves' Road The Black Hills Betrayal and Custer's Path to Little Bighorn by Terry Mort by Terry Mort (no photo)

Synopsis:

In the summer of 1874, Brevet Major General George Armstrong Custer led an expedition of some 1000 troops and more than one hundred wagons into the Black Hills of South Dakota. This fascinating work of narrative history tells the little-known story of this exploratory mission and reveals how it set the stage for the climactic Battle of the Little Bighorn two years later.

What is the significance of this obscure foray into the Black Hills? The short answer, as the author explains, is that Custer found gold. This discovery in the context of the worst economic depression the country had yet experienced spurred a gold rush that brought hordes of white prospectors to the Sioux's sacred grounds. The result was the trampling of an 1868 treaty that had granted the Black Hills to the Sioux and their inevitable retaliation against the white invasion.

The author brings the era of the Grant administration to life, with its "peace policy" of settling the Indians on reservations, corrupt federal Indian Bureau, Gilded Age excesses, the building of the western railroads, the white settlements that followed the tracks, the Crash of 1873, mining ventures, and the clash of white and Indian cultures with diametrically opposed values.

The discovery of gold in the Black Hills was the beginning of the end of Sioux territorial independence. By the end of the book it is clear why the Sioux leader Fast Bear called the trail cut by Custer to the Black Hills "thieves' road."


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The Wrath of Cochise: The Bascom Affair and the Origins of the Apache Wars

The Wrath of Cochise The Bascom Affair and the Origins of the Apache Wars by Terry Mort by Terry Mort (no photo)

Synopsis:

In February 1861, the twelve-year-old son of Arizona rancher John Ward was kidnapped by Apaches. Ward followed their trail and reported the incident to patrols at Fort Buchanan, blaming a band of Chiricahuas led by the infamous warrior Cochise. Though Ward had no proof that Cochise had kidnapped his son, Lt. George Bascom organized a patrol and met with the Apache leader, who, not suspecting anything was amiss, had brought along his wife, his brother, and two sons. Despite Cochise s assertions that he had not taken the boy and his offer to help in the search, Bascom immediately took Cochise s family hostage and demanded the return of the boy. An incensed Cochise escaped the meeting tent amidst flying bullets and vowed revenge.What followed that precipitous encounter would ignite a Southwestern frontier war between the Chiricahuas and the US Army that would last twenty-five years. In the days following the initial melee, innocent passersby Apache, white, and Mexican would be taken as hostages on both sides, and almost all of them would be brutally slaughtered. Cochise would lead his people valiantly for ten years of the decades-long war.Thousands of lives would be lost, the economies of Arizona and New Mexico would be devastated, and in the end, the Chiricahua way of life would essentially cease to exist.In a gripping narrative that often reads like an old-fashioned Western novel, Terry Mort explores the collision of these two radically different cultures in a masterful account of one of the bloodiest conflicts in our frontier history.


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An upcoming book:
Release date: February 3, 2015

The Last Days of George Armstrong Custer: The True Story of the Battle of the Little Bighorn


The Last Days of George Armstrong Custer The True Story of the Battle of the Little Bighorn by Thom Hatch by Thom Hatch (no photo)

Synopsis:

In this thrilling narrative history of George Armstrong Custer’s death at the Little Bighorn, award-winning historian Thom Hatch puts to rest the questions and conspiracies that have made Custer's last stand one of the most misunderstood events in American history. While numerous historians have investigated the battle, what happened on those plains hundreds of miles from even a whisper of civilization has been obscured by intrigue and deception starting with the very first shots fired.

Custer’s death and the defeat of the 7th Calvary by the Sioux was a shock to a nation that had come to believe that its westward expansion was a matter of destiny. While the first reports defended Custer, many have come to judge him by this single event, leveling claims of racism, disobedience, and incompetence. These false claims unjustly color Custer’s otherwise extraordinarily life and fall far short of encompassing his service to his country.

By reexamining the facts and putting Custer within the context of his time and his career as a soldier, Hatch’s The Last Days of George Armstrong Custer reveals the untold and controversial truth of what really happened in the valley of the Little Bighorn, making it the definitive history of Custer’s last stand. This history of charging cavalry, desperate defenses, and malicious intrigue finally sets the record straight for one of history’s most dynamic and misunderstood figures.


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Hell with the Fire Out: A History of the Modoc War

Hell with the Fire Out A History of the Modoc War by Arthur Quinn by Arthur Quinn (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Modoc War, pivotal in American history, pitted the peace policies of President Ulysses S. Grant and Quaker activist Lucretia Mott against William Tecumseh Sherman - the destroyer of Georgia - and his outspoken desire for the Modocs' "utter extermination." When it ended in 1873, with the execution of the tribal leaders and the relocation of the Modoc tribe to Oklahoma, the federal goverment's Peace Commission was in tatters. The way was paved toward the more famous, but no bloodier, battle at Little Bighorn and the battle at Wounded Knee, the last battle of the western Indian wars and the final closing of the frontier.


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The Lakotas and the Black Hills: The Struggle for Sacred Ground

The Lakotas and the Black Hills The Struggle for Sacred Ground by Jeffrey Ostler by Jeffrey Ostler (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Lakota Indians counted among their number some of the most famous Native Americans, including Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. Their homeland was in the magnificent Black Hills in South Dakota, where they found plentiful game and held religious ceremonies at charged locations like Devil's Tower. Bullied by settlers and the U. S. Army, they refused to relinquish the land without a fight, most famously bringing down Custer at Little Bighorn. In 1873, though, on the brink of starvation, the Lakotas surrendered the Hills.

But the story does not end there. Over the next hundred years, the Lakotas waged a remarkable campaign to recover the Black Hills, this time using the weapons of the law. In The Lakotas and the Black Hills, the latest addition to the Penguin Library of American Indian History, Jeffrey Ostler moves with ease from battlefields to reservations to the Supreme Court, capturing the enduring spiritual strength that bore the Lakotas through the worst times and kept alive the dream of reclaiming their cherished homeland.


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Children of Grace: The Nez Perce War of 1877

Children of Grace The Nez Perce War of 1877 by Bruce Hampton by Bruce Hampton (no photo)

Synopsis:

Although the Nez Perce (Nee-Me-Poo) Indians gave instrumental help to Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition, they were rewarded by decades of invasive treaties and encroachment upon their homeland. In June 1877, the Nez Perce struck back and were soon swept into one of the most devastating Indian wars in American history. The conflict culminated in an epic twelve-hundred-mile chase as the U.S. Army pursued some eight hundred Nez Perce men, women, and children, who tried to fight their way to freedom in Canada.In this enthralling account of the Nez Perce War, Bruce Hampton brings to life unforgettable characters from both sides of the conflict—warriors and women, common soldiers and celebrated generals. Looking Glass, White Bird, the legendary Chief Joseph, and fewer than three hundred warriors waged a bloody guerilla war against a modernized American army commanded by such famous generals as William Tecumseh Sherman, Nelson Miles, Oliver Otis Howard, and Philip Sheridan. Hampton also gives voice to the Native Americans from other tribes who helped the U.S. Army block the escape of the Nez Perce to Canada.


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