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Author Talk > Writers' Advice in-person groups

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

My writing group meets weekly. I presented a flash fiction story. Half the members suggested a change in setting. Half wanted only a change to make the first sentence more gripping. How do you handle contrary opinions? Go with my writer's gut?


message 2: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 14 comments The first thing you should consider is "why" a change of setting was suggested. Is the setting a drawback to the story or are there simply those that would only prefer something different, such as modern over historical or city over rural, or whatever. And a gripping first sentence, especially in a short work, can work wonders. But whatever changes you decide to go with, be true to your own self. :)


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you, L.E. The ones who wanted the change of setting thought the original setting sounded both boring and too unknown (a writer's conference). So I'm going with the second idea. We'll see how it does.

By the way, my book is being featured on Authors Roast and Toast and everyone is invited to participate.

Thanks again, Eileen


message 4: by Colleen (new)

Colleen McLain (colleenmclain) | 7 comments Eileen wrote: "My writing group meets weekly. I presented a flash fiction story. Half the members suggested a change in setting. Half wanted only a change to make the first sentence more gripping. How do you hand..."

I also belong to a weekly critique group. First and foremost, know your audience. Your critiquers are also you audience but just for the moment you are presenting. The people that don't read and or wouldn't buy your genera should be politely thanked and ignored. You know what your genera can bare, be true to the people who will be your buyers. And first sentences do count. Sometimes it takes just a word change to give the sentance punch.


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