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Charles Dickens
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General Archives > In which members identify their least favourite Dickens novel

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message 1: by Tristram (new)

Tristram Shandy I am sure that although we all love Dickens very much and some of us may even consider him their favourite author we are anything but blind followers. That's why I would be interested in which of his works you enjoyed least. It would also be very nice if you gave some reasons for your judgment.


message 2: by Tristram (last edited Aug 27, 2013 01:09AM) (new)

Tristram Shandy I may just as well start by saying that my least favourite Dickens novel is The Old Curiosity Shop, and I need not state my reasons for saying so here, because I sketched them in a review I wrote after my last reading of this novel.

Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 3: by S (new)

S Hands down-Barnaby Rudge-although his description of the riots certainly looks forward to A Tale of Two Cities. Rudge was the only Dickens novel I considered leaving unread, but since I had finished all the others, I finished it as well.


message 4: by Kim (new)

Kim I put on some other thread -- beats me where or why -- that my "least" favorite of Dickens was Hard Times, American Notes and Pictures from Italy. That being said, the reason those three would be my least favorite for now, is that I can remember almost nothing about them.

I have a cloudy memory of Hard Times being about an industrial town, mostly about a brother and sister, that's all and that might not be right.

The other two weren't novels, they were just his thoughts on Italy and America when he was in those countries, I think so anyway.

There are plenty of books I've read that I can't remember, that's the reason I re-read so much, but usually Dickens stays with me. So I just figure I must not have enjoyed those three as much, plus I've only read them once (I think) so when I get around to re-reading I may change my mind.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood should be on my list just because I'm mad he didn't finish it. :}


message 5: by Jonathan (last edited Aug 29, 2013 12:41PM) (new)

Jonathan Moran | 666 comments Mod
Kim wrote: "The Mystery of Edwin Drood should be on my list just because I'm mad he didn't finish it. :}"

Yes, I hate when little things like death pop up and distract an author from his work. Maybe, God was doing him a favor, by prematurely calling him into the next life, so that he couldn't ruin this one, by joining the ranks of the commercial elite and writing fad detective fiction. He stepped out of his calling and tried to be Collins, and we could possibly be thankful he didn't finish.


message 6: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Moran | 666 comments Mod
My least favorite, as I have said time and time again, is Oliver Twist. For whatever reason, or possibly a myriad of them, that book just didn't do it for me. I still enjoyed his writing style, but the plot barely interested me. And, like we have discussed their were too many strange coincidences which insulted what is left of my intelligence after reading The Law and the Lady by Collins. I don't particularly care for crime novels; and Twist probably loosely falls into that category. I do like murder mysteries, but I find that crime novels are something completely different.


message 7: by S (new)

S I wouldn't call Oliver Twist my least favorite, but it didn't quite live up to its rep. On the other hand, DOMBEY AND SON and MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT were better than I expected.


message 8: by Kim (new)

Kim Jonathan wrote: "My least favorite, as I have said time and time again, is Oliver Twist. For whatever reason, or possibly a myriad of them, that book just didn't do it for me. I still enjoyed his writing style, but..."

Oh, come on, Oliver Twist has some of the most amazing coincidences ever! In fact it could win an award for coincidences, all totally believable of course. :-}


message 9: by Tristram (new)

Tristram Shandy Kim wrote: "I put on some other thread -- beats me where or why -- that my "least" favorite of Dickens was Hard Times, American Notes and Pictures from Italy. That being said, the reason those three would be ..."

I'm actually looking forward to our group one day coming to Hard Times because I consider it a sorely underestimated Dickens novel.

The Notes and the Pictures I have not read as yet, but from my experience with Mark Twain I'd say that reading traveller's notes by an otherwise much-cherished author can be quite disappointing.


message 10: by Tristram (new)

Tristram Shandy S wrote: "Hands down-Barnaby Rudge-although his description of the riots certainly looks forward to A Tale of Two Cities. Rudge was the only Dickens novel I considered leaving unread, but since I had finishe..."

I must say that I have quite positive associations with Barnaby Rudge since it was the first Dickens novel I read - I must have been 15 or 16 -, and it must have been good because ever since I have been a Dickens aficionado. However, I quite forgot a lot of what happens in the novel.


message 11: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 18 comments I love Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, Great Expections and Bleak House so much that thus far I've been unable to read the earlier works. Intellectually I know that Dickens was far from a saint but the above works are guideposts for me and I'm afeared that if I read a novel of his that truly disappoints me it will somehow detract from my favorites.


message 12: by Margaret (last edited Oct 12, 2013 01:43PM) (new)

Margaret | 18 comments Yes, I hate when little things like death pop up and distract an author from his work. Maybe, God was doing him a favor, by prematurely calling him into the next life, so that he couldn't ruin this one, by joining the ranks of the commercial elite and writing fad detective fiction. He stepped out of his calling and tried to be Collins, and we could possibly be thankful he didn't finish.


Ha Ha! Yes, I mean in Collins later work we see how it went when Collins tried to be Dickens.

The poet Algernon Charles Swinburne commented: "What brought good Wilkie's genius nigh perdition? / Some demon whispered—'Wilkie! have a mission."


message 13: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments S wrote: "Hands down-Barnaby Rudge-although his description of the riots certainly looks forward to A Tale of Two Cities. Rudge was the only Dickens novel I considered leaving unread, but since I had finishe..."

Oh! I love Barnaby rudge ! My 2nd favorite.

I have to say that I like all dickens solo stories. I do not like his joint efforts like a house to let etc. Nor his poetry. But I don't like any poetry.

That being said , bleak house is my least favorite. The story is OK but the characters are not colorful and outlandish. Not in the dickens style. And that Esther! I got tired of her sighing as she wondered what the poor people were doing.

This may not be a popular opinion but... I am not crazy about a tale of two cities. Maybe because I did not live in the time of the two cities. The turmoil is retrospective for me. Agreed that it is a WELL WRITTEN masterpiece. Lucie never won me over enough to make me care if she got her man or not. The sacrifice, though sweet, was lost on me.

Yet I could read Barnaby ridge over and over.


message 14: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments RUDGE .ugh! Spell miscorrection.


message 15: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Christine wrote: "But I don't like any poetry.
"


Oh, dear. Not the Iliad or Odyssey? Not Milton's Paradise Lost? Not "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer"? Not even a single like of Shakespeare?

I'm sure you exaggerated when you said you don't like ANY poetry. At least, I hope so.


message 16: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments I do like Shakespeare! and mother goose. and shel Silverstein.

the true and sophisticated poetry you mentioned...not so much. the stories are good but the actual word for word is not my cup of tea. I tried. I even have a lot of vintage poetry books in my collection. look at the bright side. at least their condition will continue to be well preserved!


message 17: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Christine wrote: "I do like Shakespeare! and mother goose. and shel Silverstein."

All good poetry. All worth liking.


message 18: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot.


message 19: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Christine wrote: "I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot."

Not one of the better known poets. Let us know whether you find him enjoyable.

If you haven't read any Wordsworth recently, may I suggest that you do?

Perhaps The Old Cumberland Beggar
http://www.bartleby.com/145/ww139.html

Or one of my favorite poems of all time, Gray's Elegy. I love the mood set by the opening stanza.

http://www.bartleby.com/101/453.html


message 20: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments Everyman wrote: "Christine wrote: "I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot."

"

Yup. I read the right ones.
I don't doubt the genius of these writers. I can't even form an argument to discourage fans such as yourself. Its just that my brain won't see things as they were intended by the author. Although I do feel what I take away is valid in the sense that art is subject to interpretation.

I cleared my head and read. The beggar ... He smelled awful. I felt no pangs of sympathy (I felt bad that I did not feel bad as I thought the author did). I Thought " bums! Causing a problem all over the city!". At the end I wondered about the opinion of the poor guys that had to clean him up.digging a hole by hand. No family to pay them. On the family living near the common grave fearing disease ... Stimulated much thought.

The other made me giggle. Must have been the inspiration for mad libs. That is a lot of descriptive words jammed in there. I could picture cyrano de Bergerac. Plumed hat, huge lace sleeves flying around , pantaloons!! I am laughing right now. I did really like the epitaph though, the way I was supposed to <3


message 21: by Tristram (new)

Tristram Shandy Christine wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Christine wrote: "I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot."

"
Yup. ..."



There is so much to discover when it comes to poetry, Christine. I was not too much into poetry myself once, but then I happened to watch a thriller from the 70s called "Telephone" with good old Charles Bronson. There, a blackmailer used former Soviet sleeper agents, reactivating them by telling them some lines from a Robert Frost poem via phone - you know that "promises to keep" line. I liked the film, but I also thought that the poem might interest me, and from Stopping by Woods I got to Robert Frost, and from Robert Frost I got to poetry as such, discovering such great poems as London by William Blake or The Second Coming by Yeats ... And, of course, you cannot beat Shakespeare ... so give poetry a chance whenever you can, even though Sam Weller's father tells his son to give it a wide berth ;-)


message 22: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments funny you say that... I am trying to bond with leaves of grass because it is an integral part of the TV series , Breaking Bad. which I am passionate about.

I am blooming already!


message 23: by Kim (new)

Kim Since we've taken to discussing our favorite poems and poets here's mine:

At Christmas
Edgar Albert Guest

A man is at his finest towards the finish of the year;
He is almost what he should be when the Christmas season is here;
Then he’s thinking more of others than he’s thought the months before,
And the laughter of his children is a joy worth toiling for.
He is less a selfish creature than at any other time;
When the Christmas spirit rules him he comes close to the sublime.

When it’s Christmas man is bigger and is better in his part;
He is keener for the service that is prompted by the heart.
All the petty thoughts and narrow seem to vanish for awhile
And the true reward he’s seeking is the glory of a smile.
Then for others he is toiling and somehow it seems to me
That at Christmas he is almost what God wanted him to be.

If I had to paint a picture of a man I think I’d wait
Till he’d fought his selfish battles and had put aside his hate.
I’d not catch him at his labors when his thoughts are all of pelf,
On the long days and the dreary when he’s striving for himself.
I’d not take him when he’s sneering, when he’s scornful or depressed,
But I’d look for him at Christmas when he’s shining at his best.

Man is ever in a struggle and he’s oft misunderstood;
There are days the worst that’s in him is the master of the good,
But at Christmas kindness rules him and he puts himself aside
And his petty hates are vanquished and his heart is opened wide.
Oh, I don’t know how to say it, but somehow it seems to me
That at Christmas man is almost what God sent him here to be.


See all that's needed for me to enjoy poetry are two things; that it's about Christmas and that I can understand it. Of course us flat characters are like that, we don't like to think too hard. :-}


message 24: by Peter (new)

Peter My vote goes to Barnaby Rudge as my least favourite Dickens. I've tried more than once, and never finished it.

When we get to it in our book club I will give it my best effort ... promise.


message 25: by Peter (new)

Peter Everyman wrote: "Christine wrote: "I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot."

Not one of the better kn..."


Everyman wrote: "Christine wrote: "I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot."

Not one of the better kn..."


Everyman

I note you really enjoyed Gray's "Elegy." I don't want to bore you, but I am a Canadian and there is a fascinating anecdote in history to that poem's connection to one of the great events in Canadian history. If you have any interest let me know.


message 26: by Tristram (new)

Tristram Shandy Peter wrote: "My vote goes to Barnaby Rudge as my least favourite Dickens. I've tried more than once, and never finished it.

When we get to it in our book club I will give it my best effort ... promise."



Hi Peter,

as the group is just reading my least favourite Dickens, I can only tell you it's very hard to take part in these discussions with anything good to say ;-) That's not because I would find it boring or unpleasant to talk about TOCS but it's a longer time since I've read it now, and your discussions centre on such detail that I would not be able to react without re-reading the book again. And that ... well ...


message 27: by Christine (last edited Nov 02, 2013 10:50AM) (new)

Christine | 330 comments Peter wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Christine wrote: "I just purchased a book. the complete poetical works of Thomas Moore. published 1869. leather bound. print is insanely small. but I will give it a shot."

Not one..."


OH YES! I Would love to hear your bit o history. I have been to Canada a few times. Ontario/Toronto. I am ignorant of all Canadian historical events. I know about bootlegging during us prohibition and the history of casa loma. Booze and castles. Sounds like a great country! LOL.

I just LOVE a good historical story. Some day I may be a slumdog millionaire with all these bits and pieces I am collecting.

Shoot.


message 28: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments Tristram wrote: "Peter wrote: "My vote goes to Barnaby Rudge as my least favourite Dickens. I've tried more than once, and never finished it.

When we get to it in our book club I will give it my best effort ... p..."

I concur. Although I am having an GREAT time with it just the same.

This is your chance to say all those gems you are holding. Conversations are best when they are multi faceted. I can't wait for grandpa to take a dirt nap , he just strikes me s good fertilizer. And Nell seems to have psycho killer potential ( that creepy numbness she has. I can see her walking away from the deed like, that was strange but my life is good and I spared that guy from the sorrow of his sad one....) I have a crush on dick. I want wiskers the pony. I hold my breath for quilp or the brasses to appear...and feel cheated by the title.

I for one would love to hear what you don't like.


message 29: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 18 comments I haven't read Little Dorrit or Barnaby Rudge so I will probably not know if Barnaby Rudge is my least favorite since I'm rather disinclined given this and other feedback I've seen.


message 30: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments I love both of those books. Very different from each other. Little dorritt is a gorgeous book. To me it unfolds like a ribbon pulled from a tussle of long lush hair. Romantic. Funny. Suspenseful. Stuffed with interesting characters. On the order of dombey & son

BR is more like a tale of two cities. I had historical reference books all about me to totally grasp this book. Read a bit about Gordon riots first. I was entranced by the characters. The aesthetic descriptions read well to me. I was there.


message 31: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Peter wrote: "I note you really enjoyed Gray's "Elegy." I don't want to bore you, but I am a Canadian and there is a fascinating anecdote in history to that poem's connection to one of the great events in Canadian history. If you have any interest let me know. "

Absolutely!


message 32: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments After all, I look out my library window at Canada every day -- I'm actually closer to Canada than to the mainland of the US.


message 33: by Peter (new)

Peter Everyman wrote: "After all, I look out my library window at Canada every day -- I'm actually closer to Canada than to the mainland of the US."

The paths of glory lead but to the grave

Well, here's a story of Canadian history ...

Gray's Elegy was first published in 1751. In 1759 the French and British were in the midst of the Seven Year's War. The British sent an invasion force to capture Quebec and thus end the wrestling for domination in Canada. The British were led by General James Wolfe whose plan was to land near Quebec City, climb the cliffs to the Plains of Abraham, and there engage, and hopefully defeat, the French army stationed in Quebec. Before setting out to Canada and lead the British troops into battle, General Wolfe's fiancée gave him a copy of Gray's "Elegy." It is reported that Wolfe commented the night before the battle "Gentleman, I would rather have written those lines than take Quebec tomorrow." Whether those lines are apocryphal or not the following is documented history. Wolfe did defeat the French the following day, but was killed in action. His copy of Gray's "Elegy" was returned to his fiancée, and the copy had been heavily annotated by General Wolfe. Heartbroken, his fiancée gave the copy to her maid. The copy of the poem was passed down through the generations until about 15 years ago when it came up for auction. The University of Toronto has a wonderful antiquarian and rare book library called the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. At that time the library was in search of a special book to mark a symbolic event in its history. The rest, to use a cliché, is history. The U of T now proudly holds this book in its collection.

A marvelous poem, the major turning point in Canadian history, a love story, and a famous general who loved poetry more than battle. If anyone ever goes to Toronto, go to the library and hold the book in your hands.


message 34: by Tristram (new)

Tristram Shandy Christine wrote: "Tristram wrote: "Peter wrote: "My vote goes to Barnaby Rudge as my least favourite Dickens. I've tried more than once, and never finished it.

When we get to it in our book club I will give it my ..."



Basically all I have to say about TOCS I have already put into my review on that novel, but to cut it short, here are some points of criticism:

1) The whole plot is a major botch, which is probably also why you feel disappointed in the title. I would bank my last penny that Dickens had no idea whatsoever on how the story would develop when he started it. Even the characters' motivations are far-fetched: Why should Quilp, for instance, feel so vindictive towards Trent and his grand-daughter as to persecute them? Whatever happened to Nell's brother? (view spoiler) The list of why's and what-the-heck's could be prolonged.

2) The characters are uninteresting and, even for Dickens's standards, rather flat. Let's exempt Dick Swiveller and the Brasses, and maybe even Quilp from this criticism, but the rest of the characters are just cardboard stuff. Little Nell is sooooooooo perfect that I fear she may be one of Mrs. Jarley's waxwork figures come to some semblence of life by a quirk of nature. Grandfather Trent is just annoying, one of Dickens's old-men-children (terrible, terrible!). This also goes for Able Garland, whom we are probably supposed to admire for his loyalty to his parents, but who is just a ridiculous milksop. Then there is Kit, who starts as some sort of imbecile, but suddenly is a self-confident young man. How's that? Did he stumble over some magic potion? Or did his stupidity no longer fulfil Dickens's plans with this character? - Even the actors and their entourage are pale and uninteresting compared to the inimitable Mr. Vincent Crummles.

3) (view spoiler)

Although there are some traces of Dickens in it (Swiveller, The Marchioness and the Brasses, and maybe, maybe Quilp), the book to me looks more like the first-time concoction of a 15-year-old.


message 35: by Kim (new)

Kim Everyman wrote: "After all, I look out my library window at Canada every day -- I'm actually closer to Canada than to the mainland of the US."

OK, keep in mind I've been in every state on the EAST coast, and as far west as Michigan, unless Indiana is further east, I forget which....the only place I can think of that you can be in the US and not on the mainland is Hawaii, and I'm pretty sure you can't see Canada from Hawaii. However I will never know for sure because I will never go to Hawaii to find out....too hot. :-}


message 36: by Kim (new)

Kim Peter wrote: "Before setting out to Canada and lead the British troops into battle, General Wolfe's fiancée gave him a copy of Gray's "Elegy."

Before the poor guy went into battle she gives him a poem about death? Who would do this? Some good luck charm that was. :}


message 37: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Peter wrote: "Everyman wrote: "After all, I look out my library window at Canada every day -- I'm actually closer to Canada than to the mainland of the US."

The paths of glory lead but to the grave

Well, h..."


Very cool story. And I agree with him about the poem. I hope the UofT will scan the book and put it online so that we can all enjoy Wolfe's annotations.


message 38: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Kim wrote: "the only place I can think of that you can be in the US and not on the mainland is Hawaii, "

Or on an island in the northwest corner of Washington state. Islands aren't part of the mainland.


message 39: by Peter (last edited Nov 04, 2013 03:35PM) (new)

Peter Kim wrote: "Peter wrote: "Before setting out to Canada and lead the British troops into battle, General Wolfe's fiancée gave him a copy of Gray's "Elegy."

Before the poor guy went into battle she gives him a ..."


Kim

I too wonder if Wolfe's fiancée read the poem or knew much about what the poem was really about before she gave it to him. My guess is she would, given her social class. Clearly, Wolfe was familiar with Gray's work. "Elegy" is rather gloomy, but General Wolfe knew what the magnitude of the battle would be like and what he and his men would face when he attacked the French at Quebec City.

We will never know. That's the wonderful yet frustrating thing about history and literature that is out of our immediate reach and time period. We will never really know.


message 40: by Peter (new)

Peter Everyman wrote: "Kim wrote: "the only place I can think of that you can be in the US and not on the mainland is Hawaii, "

Or on an island in the northwest corner of Washington state. Islands aren't part of the ma..."


Everyman

If we look around a couple of mountains and through the fog/mist we could almost see each other. I live in Victoria, British Columbia.


message 41: by Christine (new)

Christine | 330 comments VERY NICE STORY about the Canadian and the elegy. On my next visit I will see the book in person!

If anyone is ever on philly, our public library's rare book room is home to GRIP. he was dickens raven ( the second one). He is in the book barnaby Rudge as himself. And he inspired poe's the raven.


message 42: by Peter (new)

Peter Thanks for your information Christine. I love the little bits and pieces of information as much (and sometimes more) than the novels themselves. A famous bird, indeed!


message 43: by Kim (new)

Kim Christine wrote: "VERY NICE STORY about the Canadian and the elegy. On my next visit I will see the book in person!

If anyone is ever on philly, our public library's rare book room is home to GRIP. he was dickens ..."


I get there once in a while (two and a half hours away). I'll have to check it out. Did you ever go to that weird museum with all the dead bodies in it? My son's been there a few times. I think it's called the Musser museum. Sounds a little too strange for me.:-}


message 44: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Kim wrote: "Washington State has islands? Hmm, I learn something new on here every other day or so. "

I know. Everything west of the Mississippi that isn't California or Las Vegas is terra incognito to Easterners.

It's okay. I was that way too before I moved out here. And it's fine, we have more than enough people here, so the less anybody finds out how wonderful a place it is to live, the better.


message 45: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Peter wrote: "If we look around a couple of mountains and through the fog/mist we could almost see each other. I live in Victoria, British Columbia. "

Indeed we could! We can see the lights of what I believe is probably Victoria University's playing fields (unless something else there has brilliant lighting some nights). But I'm jealous of you for one thing: when we get ferocious wind storms here, you have virtual calm there. I have seen days where we have had 50 mph winds here and Victoria University is recording high wind seeds of 5 and 6. Okay, that's probably km/h rather than mph, but still.

We used to take the kids on the ferry over to Victoria for Christmas shopping every year when they were younger, stayed in the Royal Scot hotel, loved the Provincial museum and the Christmas Shop on, if I recall correctly, Douglas street. But those were the days when a drivers license got you into and out of Canada with no problem, and all you had to do was declare that the kids with you were US citizens and nobody hassled you. It's a lot more complicated to go over these days.

But you know what a beautiful place the Pacific Northwest is. Just let's not tell anybody else. [g]


message 46: by Peter (new)

Peter Everyman wrote: "Peter wrote: "If we look around a couple of mountains and through the fog/mist we could almost see each other. I live in Victoria, British Columbia. "

Indeed we could! We can see the lights of wh..."


Everyman

The lights could well be from UVic. We do have other sport complexes but they are more inland and in the middle of Victoria. I'll keep our secret of the Pacific NW. We are looking forward to our first Christmas here. Evidently, the big Sequoia in front of the legislature building will be covered with lights for the season. That will make it the biggest lit Christmas tree I have ever seen.


message 47: by Kim (new)

Kim Everyman wrote: "But you know what a beautiful place the Pacific Northwest is. Just let's not tell anybody else..."

Never heard of it.


message 48: by Kim (new)

Kim Everyman wrote: "It's okay. I was that way too before I moved out here. And it's fine, we have more than enough people here, so the less anybody finds out how wonderful a place it is to live, the better. ..."


Where did you live when you were among us civilized people?


message 49: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Kim wrote: "Where did you live when you were among us civilized people? "

Philadelphia, Annapolis, outside D.C., Poughkeepsie, New York City, Pittsburgh. Basically up and down the Middle Atlantic states. But every summer in Maine (or, as I got older, Canada leading wilderness canoe trips).

Is that far enough East for you? [g]


message 50: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2034 comments Kim wrote: "Peter wrote: "That will make it the biggest lit Christmas tree I have ever seen."

You haven't seen mine yet. :-}"


Given that the Sequoia is the largest tree species in North America, and the one in Victoria is a pretty good specimen, I think he's got you outclassed for size.

If you want to check for sure, go to Google maps, look for Belleville St. in Victoria, B.C., Canada, put your Street View person on Belleville between Menzies Street and Government Street, and look South.

Then tell us whether you have a bigger tree than that!


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