Audiobooks discussion

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Archives > Most popular audiobook seller after Audible

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message 1: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Golden | 320 comments I was wondering who sells the most audiobooks after Audible, and if those other sites offer deals as good as those members of Audible receive.


message 2: by Erica (new)

Erica (RicoRedd) | 86 comments Good question I would love to know this as well


message 3: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments The only place I know of where you can get audiobooks at a low price, that is if you sign up for membership, is Downpour. The monthly fee is a bit higher and there are less books available, but it is growing. Sometimes they offer titles that are not available at Audible.


message 4: by Jaclyn (new)

Jaclyn | 1 comments Try tantor.com. Just listened to Orange Is the New Black. Loved it!!


message 5: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments But Jaclyn, does Tantor have a membership thing, so you can get prices down?


message 6: by Kathy (last edited Aug 26, 2013 08:54PM) (new)

Kathy Golden | 320 comments Chrissie,
I've heard of Downpour, and Jaclyn, thanks for the information on tantor.com. I visited the site; I think I've been to that site before. Downpour offers a free read each month or something like that. I receive emails from them. I guess I focus pretty much on Audible because of their specials.


message 7: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments Kathy, I wonder if there are more places like Audible and Downpour that have membership with reduced prices....


message 8: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Golden | 320 comments Chrissie wrote: "Kathy, I wonder if there are more places like Audible and Downpour that have membership with reduced prices...."

I received a booklet in the mail from another place that sells them. When I come across it, I'll list the name of it. I don't think this particular company has memberships, but it does run sales, and it sells books on CDs.


message 9: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments Thanks, Kathy. Nice you brought up the question. My living in Europe makes it even harder to order audiobooks, so many are not available to us!


message 10: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 316 comments Seeing audiobooks listed and then told you can't have them must be irritating to say the least. Only once in a while does my big city library do that to me but it really annoys.


message 11: by Erica (new)

Erica (RicoRedd) | 86 comments Geez no love for the Europeans?! That’s infuriating I'm sure.


message 12: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments Thanks for listening to me gripe. :0)


message 13: by J. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ (new)

J.   ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ | 719 comments Huge disclaimer: I don't know the legality of this so please verify for yourself.

I've seen on other sites, that if an embedded video was blocked in certain countries, the commenters would mention sites that would work like a proxy, faking a U.S. IP. I don't recall any of the site names, surely they can be found with little Googling, but please verify the legality first. If legal, perhaps this would serve as a way to circumvent the Europe problem?


message 14: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments I really don't think people should be pushed into going around the rules. That is just how I am.


message 15: by J. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ (last edited Aug 27, 2013 09:12AM) (new)

J.   ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ | 719 comments Chrissie wrote: "I really don't think people should be pushed into going around the rules. That is just how I am."

I completely agree. Just tossing out a hopefully legal workaround. I don't think I should have to rip the DRM out of every digital file I purchase, but if I wait for Apple or Audible to release their digital death grip I'll be waiting a long, long time.


message 16: by Gary (new)

Gary (mrgrumblebee) | 8 comments I'm no fan of heavy-handed digital rights management (DRM), but “I don't know the legality of this” may be the most specious disclaimer I've ever read. Fraudulently misrepresenting oneself to circumvent DRM restrictions, whether by IP address or physical address, is illegal in most municipalities; though I don't think I've ever heard of anyone prosecuted for this except in conjunction with other more serious charges (YMMV).

Due to DRM as well as Sonos & Linux availability issues I lived without Audible until quite recently; I still purchase from AudioGo (BBC), DownPour (Blackstone), and Tantor whenever they offer something competitive, but Audible's huge selection combined with the low per-credit price of an annual plan makes them quite irresistible. I'd guess that the DownPour/AudioGo merger will position DownPour strongly as a number two vendor, but it'll be a distant second and still fighting for Audible's leavings.

By taking advantage of three-for-two and other promotional offers, I've lowered my average credit price to somewhere around $8.50 per book, not including whispersync classics deals. In other words, it should come as little surprise that no one currently offers much competition to Amazon/Audible.


message 17: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 420 comments I just cancelled my second subscription to Downpour. Considering how new they are, I'm surprised they don't have a little exit survey. I sent them a detailed message letting them know the problems I have with them. I'd really like to see them become viable competition for Audible, but nearly a year in, the technical issues are still too much.


Nichole ~Bookaholic~ (nicholebookaholic) | 12 comments www.tantor.com has some great deals on their digital downloads but no membership. you can also get some good deals in their "Bargain Bin" for $6.99 only drawback is with CD's there are so many for one book..They also have several sales throughout the year on downloads and MP3 CD's


message 19: by CatBookMom (new)

CatBookMom | 995 comments Nichole ~Bookaholic~ wrote: "www.tantor.com has some great deals on their digital downloads but no membership. you can also get some good deals in their "Bargain Bin" for $6.99 only drawback is with CD's there are so many for..."

I agree. I have at least a dozen books in my Tantor library, all of them purchased at $7 or less. Some are current fiction and a few are classics, with different narrators than were available for the Amazon Whispersync deals.


message 20: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pjaye) | 449 comments Erica wrote: "Geez no love for the Europeans?! That’s infuriating I'm sure."

Not for Australians either!
I purchased a 12 month subscription to Audible and the first three books I wanted, I got the "not available in your area" Then I went to buy The Book Thief, and the Au version has a different narrator to the one in the sample.
So I rang then up and made them give me a full refund - I was so annoyed.
Just checked, I can't get "Orange is the New Black" from tantor either.

I guess I just don't understand how a book can not be available in different countries in this electronic age. They seriously just need to work out whatever those issues are.
It's ridiculous stuff like that, that makes people find illegal ways of doing things.


message 21: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments Pjaye wrote: "Erica wrote: "Geez no love for the Europeans?! That’s infuriating I'm sure."

Not for Australians either!
I purchased a 12 month subscription to Audible and the first three books I wanted, I got th..."


Pjaye, it is so easy for those who can buy everything to disregard how annoying it for people like us who cannot. It has got too change. People have to complain.


message 22: by Tomerobber (new)

Tomerobber | 193 comments I believe it's the publishers that need to be complained to . . . they are the ones who arrange for copyright and legal issues. You'd really think if they wanted to increase sales that they would work harder to resolve these issues.
Perhaps Otis could arrange some sort of form letter to have members of GR vote on and forward to the major publishers . . . so they better understand the concerns of worldwide consumers?


message 23: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments Tomerobber, if Otis could do that it would be great!


message 24: by Gary (new)

Gary (mrgrumblebee) | 8 comments I am neither a lawyer nor a publisher, but from the little I know of publication issues the problems can be tedious and complex. The publishing world may not be as fast as all would like to switch from the old geographic publication and distribution models to digital media rights, but they have made the jump to lightspeed when compared with the legal world. Publishers do want to increase sales, but they also want to pay authors, artists, and distributors as well as respect regional, national, and international copyright laws--this is not an easy task and you will find no easy target for blame. Small regional publishers will be unable to do much, if anything. If you want to petition, perhaps writing to legislators would be more effective.


message 25: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pjaye) | 449 comments The publishing world may not be as fast as all would like to switch from the old geographic publication and distribution models to digital media rights ..."

The music industry has already led the way. The publishing industry just need to get their act together. No doubt they are losing millions of dollars every year by dragging their heels with this.

When I first got my computer (many moons ago!) I wanted to buy some music, at that time, there was simply nowhere that I could pay to buy music online legally. So I joined Napster and limewire - as did millions of other people and instead of paying for it (which I was very willing to do) we got it all for free. Now I buy music, because it's easy and quick and I can get what I want in consistent format and quality.

Now with ebooks, that is still happening and the publishing industry just need to open their eyes - give people a way to buy the ebooks & audiobooks they want...or they will work out how to get them anyway and not pay.
Seriously isn't some money better than nothing until they can work out every little legal detail?
Sometimes I think these high powered executives who run these companies live with their head in the sand and are totally unaware of what really happens when they don't sort out these issues quickly.


message 26: by Samyann (new)

Samyann | 69 comments I'm not an expert, only the author of a novel available in audiobook format. DRM was an option, available when the book was published, on a number of different sites. At least for me, since I opted for self-publishing, it's a simple Yes/No option. I would imagine this wouldn't be much different for any author. From my understanding, it's a means of preventing pirating. Well, as a new author, more people reading my book wouldn't upset me, regardless of how they got it. For a well known author, I can understand DRM being an option they'd consider. Publishers do want to increase sales. But, they are in business to make money, and in today's world of publishing options, they also want simply stay viable.

As a struggling author, you are correct, Pjaye. The publishing execs do have their heads in the sand. Authors have been sorely taken advantage of by publishing companies ... ergo, self-publishing. Even big name authors are moving to self-publishing their books...they already have the advantage of name recognition and and don't need a publishing firm.


message 27: by Alisa (new)

Alisa I use Audiobooks.com When I signed up with them you could pick from three plans. There was one book a month plan, two a month, or what they called unlimited. It wasn't really unlimited but was up to 10 books a month for $29.99. Their selections isn't as extensive as Audible but I've been more than able to find books I want to listen to. I average about 6 a month so it's a lot cheaper than other sites. I think they recently did changes so I'm not sure they have the same three plan options.


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