One Hundred Years of Solitude One Hundred Years of Solitude discussion


633 views
Odd feeling after finishing

Comments Showing 1-26 of 26 (26 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Patrick Finn I just finished rereading this book, and towards the end I just got the strangest feeling. Like something dropped in the pit of my stomach. Its not really depression, but just sadness at the finality of it all. I'm not really sure how to explain it. Does anyone else know what I am talking about?


Feliks Sure. Same here. Its because the book is so densely interwoven with all sorts of texture and sensation; and when you're done, all of a sudden you're back in your lame sofa with the Andy Warhol 'Banana' print facing you on the wall opposite and your Simpsons coffee mug and the computer monitor glowing over there on the coffee table. Just doesn't compare!


Patrick Finn Yeah, there is that, but I've never really felt that way with other books.

I mean, it is like a comment on the whole of the human race, to see such a stark and inevitable end is kind of frightening.


mert yes i got that feeling too.i think the reason of this feeling is, in this book with the good sincere writing style of marquez, we get to know each one of them just as in our family.we even believe the unusual things without suspect like a child.we become a something of this book and i think,finishing this book is a kind of dying because of being a part of this book.

but,we can re-born!


Victor F. As I finished the book I just thought: is this happening to me?


message 6: by Ladynight (last edited Oct 03, 2013 06:33AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ladynight I think it is the feeling of realizing the book ended, and then is like: "Now what?"


ქეთევან Patrick wrote: "I just finished rereading this book, and towards the end I just got the strangest feeling. Like something dropped in the pit of my stomach. Its not really depression, but just sadness at the finali..."

I know the feeling, I put the book aside and lay on my bed for a long time with an empty feeling. The ending of this book is the end of the world. As if my life too had ended.


message 8: by Sam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sam Scrimger You finish a book with the perfect mesh of fantasy and realism, with gorgeous characters and flawless writing. When you finish, you actually leave a world that wasn't magical in the way of wizards and elves, but had real magic in it. And you are done after hundreds of pages of believing the possibilities in the book could have or did happen to people you care about. There's nothing else like this book.


Nikki  Grant Patrick wrote: "I just finished rereading this book, and towards the end I just got the strangest feeling. Like something dropped in the pit of my stomach. Its not really depression, but just sadness at the finali..."

I really loved this book. It is sad because that town and that family have come to an end. The ending with the birth and the cousins its sad.
Why is it called a hundred years of solitude? It has been a few years since I have read it


Nikki  Grant Ketevan wrote: "Patrick wrote: "I just finished rereading this book, and towards the end I just got the strangest feeling. Like something dropped in the pit of my stomach. Its not really depression, but just sadne..."

the first time I read it I hated that it was over, it was the first of his I had read so I went out and bought Love and the Time of Cholera, and Love and Other Demons....Love and other Demons has become one of my favorite books


Fernando Is a kind of melancholia of being involved in the feelings of loneliness that make the atmosphere of the house, even in the whole town... that hopelessness feeling that particulary made me feel, in something that have no a step back in time, that all is fate and nothing have a solution.


message 12: by Jazz (new) - added it

Jazz This was the most confusing story line I ever read.

Did anyone else get the same feeling?


message 13: by ch (last edited Oct 30, 2013 03:52AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

ch I saw this book as an immersive allegory of humanity on planet earth. We like to think that life is a self-directed project that ends in a culmination of achievement or that civilizations burn themselves out with their glories, but this book describes the reality that life is a mundane, diffused system is dominated by chance and decay. Life blooms and them folds in weirdly on itself in fatal deformity. Most characters followed this path this as did the entire family (the human race).


message 14: by Ryan (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ryan Patrick wrote: "I just finished rereading this book, and towards the end I just got the strangest feeling. Like something dropped in the pit of my stomach. Its not really depression, but just sadness at the finali..."

yes, because you become so intertwined with these people and their lives and their varied troubles and joys that it's hard to let go. At least it was for me.


ahoora Jazz wrote: "This was the most confusing story line I ever read.

Did anyone else get the same feeling?"


yeah Jazz , I'm with you !


Lizet I felt like that was happening to me, to my family, to my entire race.. and I was kind of frightened.


Shira Reiss I was in South America visiting with a Brazilian friend who took me to a lazy village on the beach up the coast. She handed me the book and said READ if you want to understand this village life. I laid in a hammock and read the book and yes, I entered another world, but when I walked around town and we went into the old lady's hut who was crotcheting lace on a hand loom, stopped and made us coffee on a small "camping" stove, I just looked in this woman's eyes and saw 100 years of solitude.


Karima A very confusing and sad story, but yet i couldn't put the book down till I finished, in a record time too.


Angela Tyler Can you imagine being such a powerful writer, have such a command of language, that you can impact readers by NOT writing?

Wow.


message 20: by Oona (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oona I almost cried. the ending was just perfect.


message 21: by Stephen R. (last edited Dec 09, 2014 09:22AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Stephen R. Marriott I remember sharing many of those feelings expressed in this discussion, but most of all I felt a huge emptiness when it was all over. I'd lived with the Buendia's, experienced births, marriages and deaths and then I was divorced from them! It was honestly emotionally challenging!! But like all multi-generations we move forward and deal with life's daily challenges.

I was actually in Colombia earlier this year and when I visited its north coast I took the opportunity to visit the birthplace of Marquez (Aracataca) and not only experienced the wooden home he was brought up in but wandered around his small village and the inspiration for One Hundred Years. And I stepped back into that book again. The next day it was announced that the novelist had died. Can you imagine how strange that felt!! The day before I'd been looking into his former crib.
RIP Gabo
Candyfloss Guitar by Stephen Marriott


amanda I got a huge empty feeling inside of me after reading it. Garcia Márquez's writing makes you grow fond to most of the characters and, like many people said above, it felt like I was part of the family. And the fact that everything's gone naturally gives that feeling. :~


Frances Haynes I had that feeling too! I think for me it was because GGM creates a word and makes you get really involved in it, and everything's so complex and you're really working to get to grips with it all the time, and then that world ends. It's built up as this big, important thing, and then it's just gone. What's more, the world is so complex, you feel like there *must* be more to discover, but you aren't able to, because GGM won't write any more, and so, in this way too, all this amazing stuff is just GONE.


Laura Bedford I had a similar feeling as well. I think GGM does an amazing job of transporting the reader into this novel with his character building and sensory descriptions. I could escape my mundane life by reading this book and now that I have finished it, I'm plopped back into the reality of my boring life and not the chaotic life of Maconda.


message 25: by Eren (new) - rated it 5 stars

Eren Me too. I think that's because Gabriel Garcia Marquez made us one of Maconda's residents throughout the story we grow some sensual connection to the family and to Maconda, The tragic end of them was funereal to me as if i really had lived through it.


Samaneh Patrick wrote: "I just finished rereading this book, and towards the end I just got the strangest feeling. Like something dropped in the pit of my stomach. Its not really depression, but just sadness at the finali..."

yes, I think I understand. there was a certain kind of pain and depression and loneliness in the entire book, in the characters' doom, etc. that have so far prevented me from revisiting the book. there is such a great amount of particular pain and depression that makes me afraid.


back to top