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Book Discussions > William Caxton

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message 1: by Steve (new)

Steve | 27 comments I just finished reading Geoffrey Hindley's "England in the Age of Caxton," a social history of 15th century England and really enjoyed his lively writing style. Even though it's over thirty years old, I'd recommend it to anyone interested in a general overview of the period. However, he only spends about 25 pages on Caxton himself. Can anyone give me a recommendation of a good book on Caxton, either fiction or non-fiction?


message 2: by Oshun (new)

Oshun | 47 comments Sorry, no. But thank you very much for the recommendation.


message 3: by Susan (last edited Aug 25, 2013 06:53PM) (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) | 418 comments Lotte Hellinga wrote "William Caxton and Early Printing in England" (2010). It was published by the British Library and was intended for general readers. She's written other things about Caxton as well, including "Caxton in Focus," which is aimed more for an academic audience.


message 4: by Steve (new)

Steve | 27 comments Susan wrote: "Lotte Hellinga wrote "William Caxton and Early Printing in England" (2010). It was published by the British Library and was intended for general readers. She's written other things about Caxton as ..."
Thanks, Susan. Our University library has a copy. I'll check it out.


message 5: by Craig (new)

Craig Lenaghan | 6 comments I'm currently reading a historical fiction book by Robin Maxwell called 'To the Tower Born' which offers an interpretation of what could have happened to the Princes in the Tower and is written partly from the POV of William Caxton's daughter, Nell Caxton (I'm not certain whether she's based on a genuine person or is a character made up by the author). William Caxton appears in it a few times, but is not a central character.


message 6: by Steve (new)

Steve | 27 comments Craig wrote: "I'm currently reading a historical fiction book by Robin Maxwell called 'To the Tower Born' which offers an interpretation of what could have happened to the Princes in the Tower and is written par..."
"To the Tower Born" was the book that started me wondering about Caxton and his connection with Lord Rivers. I found a couple of other popular books on Caxton. Neither of them mentions a daughter. Of course, that doesn't mean she didn't exist.
But I'd doubt very much that she was a mistress of Lord Rivers. Curious to know what you think of the book.


message 7: by Joan (new)

Joan Szechtman | 401 comments One tidbit that I learned about Caxton from another member of the Richard III Society was that when he returned to England to be a printer after his learning the trade, Caxton found that English had changed so much--especially its pronunciation--that he couldn't understand his native tongue. Going from memory from my research of a few years ago, English had gone through what is referred to as the great vowel shift starting around the mid-14 hundreds and hadn't completely transformed until the end of the 15th-century.


message 8: by Craig (new)

Craig Lenaghan | 6 comments Steven wrote: "Craig wrote: "I'm currently reading a historical fiction book by Robin Maxwell called 'To the Tower Born' which offers an interpretation of what could have happened to the Princes in the Tower and ..."

Well, I'm only halfway through it, but I'm quite enjoying it so far. :-D I bought it mainly because of my fascination with the mystery of the Princes in the Tower rather than William Caxton, so I think I'll enjoy the book more as I read more of it.


message 9: by Susan (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) | 418 comments Caxton did have a daughter, Elizabeth, but there's no evidence that she was a chum of Elizabeth of York's or a mistress of Anthony Woodville. Anthony was, however, a leading patron of Caxton's.


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