Goodreads Ireland discussion

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I have lived in Ireland for over 30 years.finally I've found a book that I believe explains the famine. I have tried to educate myself in Irish history since I moved here. With little success I'm afraid. I get ashamed with the role that the country of my birth(England) played in the history of Ireland. I'm almost embarrassed to learn more.
I have an American friend who said that she felt the same way after she had read Dee Brown's 'Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee'(which is a great read by the way).

I think that 'The Graves Are Walking' is truly a must read for everyone.

I hope that I've put this comment in the right spot in this group.

Thanks.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks for the recommendation, Colin. I think I might have it on my to-read list. I'll definitely bump it up my to-read list.

By the way, there's absolutely no reason for you to feel shame about Ireland's history. You did nothing to be ashamed of. You shouldn't feel responsible for other people's actions.


message 3: by Michael (new)

Michael (micky74007) I put it on my tbr list also. So many books, so little time.


message 4: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments In my list, Michael said it best-- so little time.


message 5: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments On a similar but different subject, I just finished "Return to Killibegs" by Sorj Chalandon (a french journalist). This is a fictionalized story based on D Donaldson the IRA soldier that was an informant for MI5 during the "troubles". Its a tough subject to read about, but fantastic. The book was published in English by Lilliput Press--a very creative and brave little Irish publishing company.


message 6: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments @Allan-- oh i know!!!


message 7: by Cathleen (new)

Cathleen | 2409 comments Both books sound really good; I'll put them on my tbr list. Mae, I'm going to look up Lilliput Press. It's nice to know that some small publishers are making their way.


message 8: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments At Cathleen, I am all about small publishers, we need to support them. They were the ones to put out Strumpet City again.


message 9: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Colin wrote: "I have lived in Ireland for over 30 years.finally I've found a book that I believe explains the famine. I have tried to educate myself in Irish history since I moved here. With little success I'm a..."

I saw the author when the book came out and he was quite intriguing. He has some new theories about the famine and the role of the British government so I am eager to read it. I did start it a few months ago but it is a big book so I set it aside. This encourages me to get back to it.


message 10: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Mae wrote: "On a similar but different subject, I just finished "Return to Killibegs" by Sorj Chalandon (a french journalist). This is a fictionalized story based on D Donaldson the IRA soldier that was an in..."

I just bought the Kobo e-book through my local bookshop for $7.89.
There's another book listed by the same author titled "My Traitor" that seems related. Is it the same central character.


message 11: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Allan wrote: "This was the only piece I saw on the book in the first three pages of google searches-I look forward to reading all the same-do you know the real life story of this? The fallout from the real story..."

WOW - I didn't realize this book won awards. It's on my Kobo, but I still have Ghosts of Belfast on there to finish. I read GOB a couple of years ago but Ted's awesome review got me to read it again.


message 12: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments Allan wrote: "This was the only piece I saw on the book in the first three pages of google searches-I look forward to reading all the same-do you know the real life story of this? The fallout from the real story..."Everything I know about the actual story is what I have on the internet in the last couple of weeks. But apparently the author was actually a friend of Donaldson, and he was also betrayed by him. He claims he wrote this book in an attempt to understand Donaldson's betrayal to their cause.


message 13: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments Allan wrote: "Susan-I don't think it'll be long until Stuart Neville releases his new novel-I think it's featuring the police officer character-Lennon was it? Neville is so humble-at his last book launch, he did..."You are not going to find much if a French perspective... its more like a personal perspective.


message 14: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments I am interested in hearing more about My Traitor. And if David of No Alibris says its beautiful writing, I am especially interested.


message 15: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Allan wrote: "That may have been the sales pitch lol, but he did discount it for me, as he does every time I buy something in there.

He was also telling me that they're going to be continuing the summer book c..."


Is "he" David of No Alibris? My indie bookstore has book groups that meet every weeknight Mon-thurs through the month. I believe there is a waiting list for available nights. Our James Joyce group (Sara is a member as am I) is the first Thurs. Here's a list:
Capital James Joyce
Classics
Daytime
Evening Fiction
Fascinating History
Futurist
Graphic Novel
Lez Read
Poetry
Public Affairs
Science Fiction & Fantasy
Spanish Language
Spirituality
Swarthmore
Teen
Travel
Veterans
Women's Biography
I was in the Travel group but we seemed to read endless books that were more history and current politics especially about the Indian subcontinent, and 2 by Herodotus in one year (too much for me) so I quit. Book groups can be quirky.


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

Daytime, Evening fiction and Swarthmore? What the hell are those?


message 17: by Sara (new)

Sara | 2357 comments Mod
In addition to the Joyce one at our indie bookstore I attend both the science fiction and fantasy groups (same night, many of the same people, but fantasy is technically it's own group meeting an hour before scifi). I very occasionally attend the Graphic Novel group if they're reading something I like, and I'm starting to attending the Lez Reads group. It's entertaining noticing the differences between the people and structure of each group.


message 18: by Sara (new)

Sara | 2357 comments Mod
There is fiction group that meets during the day (I believe they're mostly retirees) and one that meets at night. They read entirely different books (and the daytime group apparently reads some nonfiction).

I had to look this part up, but "The Swarthmore Book Group is composed of Swarthmore alumni, parents of Swarthmore students, and interested others, who meet in discussion groups all over the metro area during the academic year to read a list of books on a theme developed by a Swarthmore College professor. One section meets on the third Monday of the month at Politics & Prose, and anyone is welcome to join."

For reference Swarthmore is a private liberal arts college located in Pennsylvania.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Sara.

Because they were nestled quite snugly among very recognisable genres I though that they might have been areas of fiction that had somehow passed me by.


message 20: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Sara wrote: "There is fiction group that meets during the day (I believe they're mostly retirees) and one that meets at night. They read entirely different books (and the daytime group apparently reads some non..."

I always wondered about the Swarthmore group. I assume they have to open it to interested others in order to get the bookstore space.


message 21: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Sara wrote: "In addition to the Joyce one at our indie bookstore I attend both the science fiction and fantasy groups (same night, many of the same people, but fantasy is technically it's own group meeting an h..."

I have thought about attending the Spanish group (they read novels in Spanish) but I suspect I would read the novel in English.


message 22: by Sara (new)

Sara | 2357 comments Mod
It does look like they're open to the public and their reading theme for the next year is quite interesting, "Spectacles of Marriage," but I have too many books to read as is (A problem I much of the rest of this group emphasizes with).


message 23: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments One of the difficulties of belonging to a book club is the "obligation" to read the choice. I feel this is less weighty in an online group :)
I have been so pulled by this group to read lots of the Irish books on my shelves, but this week have turned my attention to short stories and mysteries that aren't Irish (though I have plenty that are).


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

The only other book club I've ever attended is the movie book club, which I haven't been able to attend sincr starting the course I'm currently. The reason I joined an online group was for the greater flexibility.

BTW, I had concocted some daft notion that Swarthmore was an obscure genre of fiction based around handome, dark-haired and olive-skinned lead characters. Or at least I hoped it was.


message 25: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Declan wrote: "The only other book club I've ever attended is the movie book club, which I haven't been able to attend sincr starting the course I'm currently. The reason I joined an online group was for the grea..."

OMG - it is sometimes so funny how things get translated across cultures.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

I did feel a little stupid when I heard the actual explanation. :/


message 27: by Mae (new)

Mae (goodreadscommae) | 217 comments lol


message 28: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Declan wrote: "I did feel a little stupid when I heard the actual explanation. :/"

Please don't or all of us Yanks will look far stupider as there is so much we have to ask about here.


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Barbara. I'll try not to beat myself up over my inane ramblings.


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

It's getting added, Allan. Why the hell not?


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

It's around 100 books at the moment. I'm worried that it might get so out of hand that I'll lose all intention if reading the books. Then the shelf becomes pointless.


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

There's no fear of that happening.


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

The work is hard, but it pays well. ;)


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Most days? I happens every day. And that's throughout every day.


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

There isn't a lot to run.

I make sure no-one's being abusive and I take responsibility for the running of the nominations and polls. The members' input is what keeps it going.


message 36: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments I read Return to Killybegs and plan to read My Traitor soon. I got both as e-books (Kobo) as it was the cheapest option here in the states.

Declan - 100 books on your "to read" list is a lot but I have 434. You're younger than me so it seems do-able.
Quite a few are books I own and haven't read. Many are books I see on Goodreads and want to read. Sometimes I take books off my shelf after seeing more reviews. And as I shared here earlier this summer I got rid of over 200 books - giving to friends, the library and swapping:). I am getting close to 100 books already this year and at this rate have 4 years of reading to get through my list. But I don't think of it that way,as I read for enjoyment which includes being on Goodreads.


message 37: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Barbara. That helped me think of my unread books as friends, again. :)


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

I've been waiting a while fir that lotto win, myself, Allan. I'm getting sick of waiting. I think a frivolous law suit is on the cards.


message 39: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Allan's comment reminded me that I also have a physical "to read" shelf on one bookcase which has 20 or more books. I have wish lists and a buy later basket at Amazon, and a wish list at Alibris. I wish Kenny's had a wish list feature as I prefer to order 2 or 3 books at a time from them to save on my carbon footprint.


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Barbara, that sounds equally daunting and impressive.


message 41: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments One thing that motivates me is to read books on a related theme. Summer 2012 I read several books on Haiti and the Dominican Republic. I seem to be on a Northern Ireland/Troubles jag right now. As bibliophiles well know, one books leads us to another and then another.


message 42: by [deleted user] (new)

The only thing I do like that is read books by the same author, which I suppose amounts to the same thing: One book making you want to devour more and more.


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