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Archives > The Hound of the Baskervilles - August 22-September 11

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message 1: by Jenn, moderator (new)

Jenn | 303 comments Mod
Please discuss The Hound of the Baskervilles.


message 2: by Phil (new)

Phil (lanark) I'm betting the Hound did it :)


message 3: by Leslie (new)

Leslie I'll be joining in if that is OK.


message 4: by Pip (new)

Pip I really hope you all enjoy this, especially if you're reading it for the first time. For me, this is by far the best Holmes story.


message 5: by LaLaLa Laura (new)

LaLaLa Laura  (laurabhoffman) ill have to check it out pippa!


message 6: by Renate (new)

Renate | 10 comments I've read this a while ago and though it is one of the most famous Holmes-stories, I didn't like it a lot. It was oke, don't get me wrong, but I've read several Holmes-stories I liked better. I think I'll join in occasionaly and give it another chance. :)


message 7: by Pip (new)

Pip If you give it another go, Renate, focus on the moors and their description. They almost become a character in their own right.

Despite being set almost entirely outside London, and Dartmoor being such a wide, wild open space, their is an intense claustrophobia in this novel which I feel shows Doyle to be a great writer, rather than "simply" a clever detective story writer - and I think he would have been very happy with that review!


message 8: by Renee (new)

Renee The setting on the moors, the legend of the curse on the Baskervilles of the devil dog and the setting of the house made this book kind of creepy. I agree with Pip that just the setting of the moors and the house seem to become a character all by themselves that adds to the strangeness of the story. I loved it!


message 9: by Catherine (last edited Aug 28, 2013 03:26PM) (new)

Catherine (yarnmama10) I am on chapter 9 right now where Watson is giving his second report to Holmes on his findings at Baskerville Manor(Estate?). I don't have any meaningful comments except to say that this story has been the most engrossing and compelling one so far. I am enjoying it!


message 10: by Pink (new)

Pink Pip wrote: "I really hope you all enjoy this, especially if you're reading it for the first time. For me, this is by far the best Holmes story."

I agree, this was my first Holmes and still my favourite so far.


message 11: by Leslie (new)

Leslie Catherine wrote: "I am on chapter 9 right now where Watson is giving his second report to Holmes on his findings at Baskerville Manor(Estate?). I don't have any meaningful comments except to say that this story has the most engrossing and compelling one so far. I am enjoying it! ..."

It certainly is engrossing - I started last night and am almost done! I had to chuckle in the first chapter though, when Watson was making his deductions based on the stick left by Dr. Mortimer :)


message 12: by Catherine (last edited Aug 29, 2013 07:56PM) (new)

Catherine (yarnmama10) It certainly is engrossing - I started last night and am almost done! I had to chuckle in the first chapter though, when Watson was making his deductions based on the stick left by Dr. Mortimer :)

Yes, that was a good part. At least he was showing some progress in applyng Holmes' methods. ;-)


message 13: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 627 comments I'm not going to read previous posts in case there's a spoiler, but I'm about 3/4 through and this is by far the best of any of the stories or collections so far. I somehow end up listening to it while walking my dog at dusk or just after dark and some of the vivid description of the moor make my spine tingle... it's fantastic!


message 14: by Janet (new)

Janet (goodreadscomjanetj) | 77 comments I thought the best part of the book was the description of the moor. Listening to the book while walking your dog after dark(or at dusk) must be a really interesting experience.


message 15: by Leslie (new)

Leslie Alana wrote: "I'm not going to read previous posts in case there's a spoiler, but I'm about 3/4 through and this is by far the best of any of the stories or collections so far. I somehow end up listening to it ..."

I also listened to an audiobook edition - the second Librivox recording by Bob Neufeld. Very good narration; his voice sounded just like I imagined Dr. Watson. Who did the narration in yours?


message 16: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 627 comments I listened on audio as well, just finished this morning. By far, the best Holmes story, and probably one of the best books I've read all year. I couldn't put it down! I loved the descriptions of the moor and the sounds associated with it. Most of the time, descriptions become rather muddled to me and I just want to get back to the story, but this story was done so brilliantly that I loved feeling chills when Watson hears the cry of the hound across the moor, or sees the mist, etc. Made my skin crawl. Excellent writing!


message 17: by Beth (new)

Beth (k9odyssey) I also liked The Hound of the Baskervilles better than Study in Scarlett and Sign of the Four. While all three were enjoyable stories, I found this one more atmospheric with the eerie moor and the tangled web of characters. And as always SH is full of surprises. I am learning to love Watson and often identify with the way he feels in uncomfortable situations.


message 18: by Denise (new)

Denise (drbetteridge) | 47 comments It's my first time reading Hound of the Baskervilles, but I am enjoying it. I don't know why I'm letting it bother me, but I ran across this quote last night that I just don't understand. I know what he means, but can't figure out the connection. (Sir Henry, about going to Baskerville Hall) "...my answer is fixed. There is no devil in hell, Mr. Holmes, and there is no man upon earth who can prevent me from going to the home of my people." Surely, Doyle didn't just throw that in for no reason, but it doesn't make sense to me.


message 19: by Pip (new)

Pip I think if you take out the Mr Holmes, it might make more sense, ie neither devil nor man can stop him going to Baskerville Hall. Is that right, or have I missed something deeper?!


message 20: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 627 comments I think you've got it, Pip, that's how I read it, too. kind of that "neither wind nor rain nor storm. ..."


message 21: by Denise (new)

Denise (drbetteridge) | 47 comments Thanks. I guess I was trying to read too much into it. That's me all over.


message 22: by Pip (new)

Pip Glad to be of service :-) I'm glad it wasn't a question about a sentence of Henry James'.....


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