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message 1: by Rachel (new)

Rachel John (racheljohn) | 4 comments I was curious to hear other author's experiences with ads, whether on goodreads, amazon, a blog or elsewhere.


message 2: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments I have tried Bookdaily with unclear results. No noticeable increase in sales.

Thought about GR but price is a block, it should break even at least otherwise what is the point.


message 3: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 453 comments I have considered ads on a few places but like Philip I've found the price to be a bit much. I am one of those people whom if I invest money into something I want to know theres going to be reults. There are good affordable ads out there, just gotta find them.


message 4: by Regina (last edited Aug 22, 2013 06:26PM) (new)

Regina Shelley (reginas) | 17 comments Yeah, I us Project Wonderful, but I'm not just promoting my book. I have a massive blog site that's basically the vehicle for the book. Something I highly recommend to set yourself apart and build a fan base.

I run ads to get new fans for the site, not to sell the book. But once someone becomes a regular fan of the scene I've created, and I get them coming back at least once a week, they will usually buy the book.

Keep in mind that advertising works best when it's repetitive. People have to keep seeing something repeatedly before they start taking notice of it. The nice thing about Project Wonderful is that you only pay for click-throughs, and you only pay until your money runs out (so you don't get hit with a huge bill you didn't anticipate. You pic how much you want to spend and where to place your ads.

Advertise on an active site with similar content and an enthusiastic fan base, and you can get some of that good attention directed at your own work.


message 5: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Regina wrote: "Yeah, I us Project Wonderful, but I'm not just promoting my book. I have a massive blog site that's basically the vehicle for the book. Something I highly recommend to set yourself apart and build..."

I will check it out.


message 6: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Lawston (andrewlawston) | 47 comments I had a flutter on Goodreads advertising last year. I got a few clicks, a few random people added my book to their "want to read" shelves. There were a couple of sales I could probably attribute to the advertising - nothing you could call solid ROI, though. I put down $35 and made perhaps $2 back...

But then I didn't publish a book of short stories about haunted photocopiers expecting to make money, so I can't pretend I resent the experience. It's all a bit of a giggle really, and I'll have another bash at advertising when I get another book organised.


message 7: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Trying Project Wonderful and I'll see how it goes. limited budget and time


message 8: by Regina (new)

Regina Shelley (reginas) | 17 comments Here's the thing: the market is saturated. There's no point in trying to "make money" when you first start out. What you have to concentrate on is getting your name out there and building an audience. The sales will come eventually, but we are tiny little drops in a planet sized ocean, and the best you can hope for to start out is to get notices.

Sales are a wonderful thing, don't get me wrong. But don't expect them to come pouring in without some effort.


message 9: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Regina wrote: "Here's the thing: the market is saturated. There's no point in trying to "make money" when you first start out. What you have to concentrate on is getting your name out there and building an audien..."

It certainly is a quagmire out there and lots of sites wanting to take money for adverts including GR and not then showing a return. I am not seeking to earn a living or even cover my real costs, just generate a bit of interest, with interest will come reviews and hopefully sales.

I'm experimenting with price as well and I shall try a few giveaways, probably KDP Selct, in the next few weeks.


message 10: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Just set up these

http://phenweb.wordpress.com/2013/08/...

Open to criticism, guidance or just abuse...


message 11: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 49 comments Philip wrote: "Just set up these

http://phenweb.wordpress.com/2013/08/...

Open to criticism, guidance or just abuse..."


Of the 3, I think I liked the bottom one best. I wasn't sure about the art on 1 and the verbiage on 2 got lost in the art. IMHO.

Good luck with the pricing. I sold more at 2.99 than I did 0.99 And, my 12.99 CS paperback is quickly catching up.

With my 3 day give away on KDP I got 800+ downloads and as far as I know none of them generated a review. This is probably lucky for me because I made the newbie mistake of missing significant spelling and punctuation errors. I had to update.

All good fortune to you.


message 12: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Steven wrote: "Philip wrote: "Just set up these

http://phenweb.wordpress.com/2013/08/...

Open to criticism, guidance or just abuse..."

Of the 3, I think I liked the bottom one best. I wasn'..."


Thanks for the comments, I'll look and see if I can get the words clearer on 2. The art on one is from the cover, and you tube trailer. But if it doesn't work it doesn't work!


message 13: by Steven (new)

Steven Malone | 49 comments Philip wrote: "Steven wrote: "Philip wrote: "Just set up these

http://phenweb.wordpress.com/2013/08/...

Open to criticism, guidance or just abuse..."

Of the 3, I think I liked the bottom on..."


Remember, that's just my opinion and worth every dime you paid for it. what doesn't work for me may gain you NY Times bestseller rank with the millions of others that will be drawn to your book by that cover.


message 14: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Steven wrote: "Philip wrote: "Steven wrote: "Philip wrote: "Just set up these

http://phenweb.wordpress.com/2013/08/...

Open to criticism, guidance or just abuse..."

Of the 3, I think I like..."


I appreciate the comments and I agreed after checking on a couple of other devices, so I have lightened the background and fiddled with the font a bit - looks clearer whilst maintaining the style I hope


message 15: by Regina (last edited Aug 23, 2013 10:02AM) (new)

Regina Shelley (reginas) | 17 comments Personally, I would remove "out now." It's redundant and clutters your ads with unneeded info. Clearly, your book's out now. That's why there's an ad. If it were part of a series your target audience might be waiting for, or if it goes in with some previous hype and people are waiting for it, I can see it.

I did use "now available in trade paperback" or some such on my own ads, but I was targeting previously targeted audiences.

On that bottom ad, why not pull your title up into the sky so that it's not fighting with the background? There's room for it.

I dunno. Just my thoughts. Your mileage may vary.


message 16: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Regina wrote: "Personally, I would remove "out now." It's redundant and clutters your ads with unneeded info. Clearly, your book's out now. That's why there's an ad. If it were part of a series your target audien..."

Thanks for the advice, I'll adjust accordingly. No change in sales at all since the ads started going out.


message 17: by Regina (last edited Aug 26, 2013 06:24AM) (new)

Regina Shelley (reginas) | 17 comments Personally, I am not entirely sure ads in and of themselves will work all that well for indie writers. Simply because of the huge saturation of the market. They work, but not by themselves.

They have worked for me, but again, I'm not driving traffic to my Amazon link. I'm driving it to my website. I have a website that supports the book, and actually existed long before the book came out.

The book is an offshoot of the website, not the other way around.

So I was able to use the site to build an audience and a fan base. When the book was due to come out, I was able to build a little hype. The ads drive traffic to the site, and the site has a prominent ad to the book on Amazon.

It would appear that most of my sales are coming from fans of the site. What I'm seeing as a pattern is I run and ad and my traffic goes up, not my sales. Eventually, I start getting some sales. But I have to get new fans used to going to the site regularly. But this is not an immediate thing, it takes time. So don't' run a week of ads and expect to see your sales take off. I don't see evidence that it works that way. You have to get people used to seeing your stuff. It's said that a person has to see your ad something like seven or so times on average for them to start thinking about clicking on something. One round of ads that yield no sales is not necessarily a failure.

This is a slow process. But your books won't go rancid on a shelf, they'll be there for the long haul. So don't get discouraged.

I highly recommend giving the John Locke book a go and see if you find something useful in it. How I Sold 1 Million eBooks in 5 Months

Also, I am not someone who is great at marketing, so understand I'm trying to find my way through this just like everyone else. I worked in a marketing department because I am a graphic designer by trade, not because I am a marketer by trade. But I know enough to know that if you want to be successful, you have to find a way to stand out.


message 18: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 453 comments Regina,
I definitely would like to try ads now. Having read you and Philips comments here it's got me curious and eager to take a stab at it. I'll look at that last link you posted. Wheres a good place to start and what does the ad need to consist of? I'll look into it for sure. I have hit a huge marketing block as of late.


message 19: by Regina (last edited Aug 31, 2013 08:27PM) (new)

Regina Shelley (reginas) | 17 comments I love Project Wonderful. Spend some time looking over the sites they have available for you to run banners on.

This is how I figure a lot of mine out...I write western historical romance with lots of fun characters. It's fiction, not comics, but I have a lot of high quality artwork, much of which features pretty young men. I know what sort of audience I've built up (the largest demographic is women from college age to middle age, with a nice appeal to high school girls as well.) I've found several sites that have similar demographics as mine and target ads to them. My ads tend to feature images that will appeal to that target audience.

I have various styles of artwork at my disposal. So I choose ads that I think will appeal to that specific audience as well. If I'm running ads on a site that I know has a lot of, say manga fans on it, I'll use an ad that features art from my artist that has has a bit of a manga flair in her art. If the ad's being run on a site where people are looking for realistic western stories, I run ads with grittier, more realistic art.

It's all about targeting. You wouldn't plant seeds for seaweed in the middle of the Mohave. So make sure you "plant your seeds" in the correct climate. That's why I like Project Wonderful. And if you misplace your target and get no hits, you don't pay. You only pay for clickthroughs. Simply move your ad if it's not successful.

I'm not running any ads right now, or I'd post some links so you could see the difference in tactics. If we're still having this conversation later when I actually am running ads, I'll drop a link and you can see what I mean.

And also, while we're on the subject of ads, I'm personally fondest of what's called "skyscraper" banners. They're tall and narrow, and stay on the screen just a little longer as the viewer is scrolling down a page. (Plus, they're a challenge to design, and as a graphic designer, I like that.)

Here's a wiki link to standard banner sizes you might find useful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_banner

Now, having said that, the husband, who has far better instincts than I do, has placed ads on sites I would not have thought would have been successful targets, but I was proven wrong. So I guess the takeaway here is "target carefully...but don't be afraid to take risks."

Good luck!


message 20: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 93 comments Regina wrote: "Personally, I love Project Wonderful. Spend some time looking over the sites they have available for you to run banners on.

This is how I figure a lot of mine out...I write western historical rom..."


Hi thanks for the advice, still to early to tell for my ads. The design is a challenge as I wanted to use book backgrounds that I had already done. We'll see on the number of views etc. I have just tried Ask Dave as well. I have tried BookDaily but I have not tried on GR or Amazon.


message 21: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 453 comments Are there any ad sites that don't cost money? I'm on AskDavid.com but I have no clue what they even do and how they post ads for you.

I finally got to sit down and look into the site ProjectWonderful but it's a paying site..


message 22: by Stan (new)

Stan Morris (morriss003) This is the last day of a two month test of Google Ads. July's volume was up, but August's volume was much lower.


message 23: by Regina (new)

Regina Shelley (reginas) | 17 comments Project Wonderful is a paying site, yes, but you only pay for clickthroughs. No clicks, no payment.

Plus, you can pick sites where it costs pennies for clicks. That's not going to break the bank.


message 24: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 453 comments Hmm..I should look more into it and figure out if it's for me.


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