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Author Q&A's > [Closed] Author Q&A: Charles D. Martin

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message 1: by Kathy (last edited Aug 21, 2013 03:44PM) (new)

Kathy | 905 comments Hi everyone! Here is our next Q&A. Charles D. Martin is the author of Nadia's Obsession.
Nadia's Obsession by Charles D. Martin

Nadia's Obsession continues the story of a young Russian woman as told in Charles Martin's first novel, Provocateur. A Brief prologue enables readers to jump right into the his second novel, if they have not read the first. Martin's fascinating protagonist was born an orphan and had a troubled desperate early life, but was blessed with superior intelligence and beauty. She escaped her impoverished circumstances coming to America through a mail-order-bride program. In America, she became involved with an ex-CIA agent named Olga and, as part of her unique enterprise, is catapulted into a thrilling and dangerous life filled with suspense, intrigue and sexual tension. This second novel steps up the pace of intrigue and sexual intensity as Nadia and Russoff, the Russian oligarch, clash again in a battle of wits. A new romance emerges and takes its twists and turns and the reader experiences new aspects of the gamesmanship between the sexes. Charles Martin once again holds us spellbound and leaves us wanting more.

Please leave your questions by August 26.


message 2: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 905 comments What inspired you to write Nadia's Obsession?


Iesha (In east shade house at...) (emberblue) Which of your characters do you relate to the most, and why?


message 4: by Emily (new)

Emily Saunders | 1 comments Did you have the plot solidly formed before beginning to write, or did ideas come to you while wrote which changed the shape of the overall story? And if so, how did you cope with problems that arose from changes in your ideas?


message 5: by Natasha (new)

Natasha | 1 comments What was the basis for your decision to have the protagonist of this series be a young Russian female?


message 6: by James (new)

James | 1 comments As a male author, did you find it difficult to write in such depth from a woman's perspective?


message 7: by Anna (new)

Anna (goodreadscomanna_shuk) What are your future writing plans? Can you give us a little glimpse of your ne ideas?


message 8: by Ella (new)

Ella Does this story relate to you personally in any way or is it an idea that just popped out of the blue? How/where do you find inspiration for your amazing stories?


message 9: by R.J. (new)

R.J. Crayton (rjcrayton) | 6 comments This book is about a woman deeply involved in the CIA. How did you get the knowledge to write effectively about the CIA? Are you a former spy? Did you interview ex-agents? Or do you work for NSA and you spy on the CIA as part of your job, so you know all the CIA's secrets?


message 10: by Ainsley (new)

Ainsley (ainsleygrace) | 25 comments i haven't read this book, but i'll give it a shot.
where is your favorite place to write? do you write with pen and paper or a computer?


message 11: by Hayley (new)

Hayley (minidf) | 15 comments Just a couple of suggestions:

Where did you get your inspiration for Olga? Did any real people influence your portrayal of this character?

Are you planning on writing a new series at some point in the future?

Do you ever experience writers block? Is there anything you do to try and overcome this?


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

How do you get your creative juices flowing?


yah um hi im shimmi soo (bethanybooks) | 30 comments What was your favourite part in this book to write?


message 14: by Natalie (new)

Natalie (natalie1703) | 1 comments How do you build your vocabulary as a writer?


message 15: by Olivia (new)

Olivia McCloskey (brewingupbooks) | 2470 comments Mod
When did you begin writing?

How many pages/chapters do you typically write per day?


message 16: by Rebekah (new)

Rebekah  | 104 comments What made you write this sequel? Was it because you enjoyed writing the first book a lot, or because it was such a hit....


message 17: by Kathy (last edited Aug 29, 2013 03:10PM) (new)

Kathy | 905 comments Thanks everyone! You're questions were all fantastic! I'm sending them out now :)


message 18: by Sammy (new)

Sammy | 2 comments What made you portray Nadia as a young Russian woman? Is there more to it ?


message 19: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 905 comments Here are the replies!


What inspired you to write Nadia's Obsession?

Readers of my first novel, Provocateur, universally wanted more. Also, ideas related to the theme of my first novel, kept bubbling up. I had to do it.

Which of your characters do you relate to the most, and why?

Although, I am male, I relate to the character issues/& challenges of Nadia, but not to her female gender side.

Did you have the plot solidly formed before beginning to write, or did ideas come to you while wrote which changed the shape of the overall story? And if so, how did you cope with problems that arose from changes in your ideas?

Most people are amazed, but I write linearly. I have no idea where the story is going when I start. I am as interested, as readers might be, in what is going to happen in the story. I am anxious to find out, so I keep writing. However, I do always have a theme or underlying thesis. I like writing about strong, audacious women.

What was the basis for your decision to have the protagonist of this series be a young Russian female?

That decision arose out of the character definition that emerged in my mind. My wife and I helped a niece adapt a Russian child. It was through that process that I learned about the dreadful conditions in orphanages in that country and the behavioral challenges that affection deprivation puts on the children-orphans there. It made for an interesting personality twist/profile for my protagonist.

As a male author, did you find it difficult to write in such depth from a woman's perspective?

Interesting question. I have been a lifelong student of women and think I understand them better than most men. Women are much more complex and subtle than men. I find them to be fascinating creatures. In particular, I have come to appreciate intelligent women and admire those that are strong and audacious.

What are your future writing plans? Can you give us a little glimpse of your new ideas?

I am already started on the third novel and excited about it. I have a very interesting new character; the daughter of a Somali pirate. She is an awesome woman that would intimidate any man.

Does this story relate to you personally in any way or is it an idea that just popped out of the blue? How/where do you find inspiration for your amazing stories?

I’m sure the roots of story and theme are drawn from observations and experiences in life…but none literally. It seems to burst forth from my imagination.

This book is about a woman deeply involved in the CIA. How did you get the knowledge to write effectively about the CIA? Are you a former spy? Did you interview ex-agents? Or do you work for NSA and you spy on the CIA as part of your job, so you know all the CIA's secrets?

I never worked for the CIA as an agent, but in my younger life I ran high technology projects for a contractor to the CIA and NSA. i haven't read this book, but i'll give it a shot.

where is your favorite place to write? do you write with pen and paper or a computer?

I write anywhere, anytime on paper or the computer…but only when ideas bubble up that excite me.

Where did you get your inspiration for Olga? Did any real people influence your portrayal of this character?

The character of Olga was inspired by two fabulous women, one of which I met personally. They were CIA and OSS operatives during WWII. These were courageous, fearless…truly audacious women. I recommend that readers go to my website (www.nadiasobsession.com ) and read about them under the tab “strong, audacious women”.

Are you planning on writing a new series at some point in the future?

It is already started.

Do you ever experience writers block? Is there anything you do to try and overcome this?

No. I only write when I have ideas that excite me, then it just flows out quickly and smoothly.

How do you get your creative juices flowing?

It just happens as a result of living an interesting life.

What was your favorite part in this book to write?

There were so many fun scenes: the temptuous/salacious dance scene between Nadia and Alexandra (recalls the scene from Sent of a Woman); the chess match against the Grandmaster; the scene asking the question, “What is beauty?”; the contest between Nadia and the oligarch Vladimir Russoff,; the innovative sex scene on the island of Simi, the snakes…There were so many fun scenes to write.

How do you build your vocabulary as a writer?

70 years of living & writing.

When did you begin writing?

I have been an active writer most all of my life, but always on serious matters, in a narrative mode. Fiction is new, creative and great recreation for me. I love creating characters, giving them names and running them through life experiences.

How many pages/chapters do you typically write per day?

Zero to a lot.

What made you write this sequel? Was it because you enjoyed writing the first book a lot, or because it was such a hit....

See first question.

What made you portray Nadia as a young Russian woman? Is there more to it?

There is a lot more to it.
The first novel, Provocateur, begins with an incident that actually happened at the Pelican Hill Resort, near Newport Beach, California. I initially wrote a short story about that incident…then it seemed to take on a life of its own and turned into a novel. Many elements shaped the creation of Nadia. I attended the America’s Cup races in Valencia, Spain a few years ago and spotted a fabulous large power yacht docked near to ours. It name was an exotic Russian woman’s name. I went on the internet hoping to find out who owned the yacht and ended up of a Russian mail-order-bride site by the same name (maybe not a coincident)…ergo the mail-order-bride angle in the book. All this, combined with the adoption of a Russian orphan for my niece fit together to form the character of Nadia and the story.


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