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message 1: by James (last edited May 04, 2009 07:54AM) (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments I've always been interested in writer's houses, writer's bars and the places that may have influenced or informed a great piece of literature. Sloppy Joe's in Key West never did much for me but most other writerly places, without the commemorative tee-shirts and mugs, have. Often it's enough to simply have a beer in the White Horse Tavern in Greenwich Village and think about Dylan Thomas raging there during his final days. Or to walk in Poe's brilliant and delirious footsteps along Shockoe in Richmond. Joyce's Dublin/Paris. Faulkner's Mississippi. Fante's fleabag hotel room in LA. Dante's tomb in Florence. I've mentioned here before that Richard Yates wrote Revolutionary Road in a small well house less than a mile down the road from where I live now. I recently raised a glass to Yates and the star-crossed Wheelers in that very well house and and enjoyed it immensely.

I'm posting this topic as a place where we can log thoughts and experiences pertaining to the physical places where writers worked and lived.

Why now? Because yesterday up in Western Mass I had an interesting literary landmark double header. One planned, the other serendipitous.

At dawn outside of Stockbridge, my brother-in-law and I climbed Monument Mountain, a modest 1600 foot rise, the granite and quartz top of which, Squaw Peak, provided a stunning view of the green-blooming Housatonic Valley. At the Peak I pulled out the trail map that I'd grabbed at the base of the park and happened to read about two esteemed writers from eastern Mass who were finally introduced on a hike on Monument Mountain in 1850. One named Herman and the other Nathaniel. According to the map: "Hawthorne, who had just finished the Scarlett Letter, provided ideas and encouragement that inspired Melville to complete a novel he was struggling with; Melville would dedicate Moby Dick to Hawthorne in 1851."

Since my brother-in-law isn't much of a fiction reader -- engineering is his thing -- our ideas and encouragement mostly had to do with craft beer and our diminished climbing skills.

Part II was planned. We had driven to Stockbridge to take our kids (most specifically my eight year-old nephew who is an old house buff, if one can be a buff at anything when you're barely one in dog years) to see some estates, specifically Edith Wharton's "The Mount". It's a terrific piece of architecture, mostly designed by EW, and heavily influenced by Italian and (especially the gardens) English estates. This is where she lived for ten years during what the guides called a "mismatched marriage". I love when the guides are forbidden to tell the truth. Was she gay? Was he cheating on her? Or was she cheating on him with her pal Henry James. Unless he was gay...I forget.

Anyway, this is where Wharton wrote House of Mirth, the book that put her, and in many ways, female American novelists, on the map. The desk and her impressive book collection and garden view is still there. Henry James had his own room upstairs and often wrote fondly of the place.

I wonder what Edith and Henry would have thought about seeing four kids under the age of 11 howling through the halls, pressing the docent for details regarding ghost sightings.

Much of The Mount has been lovingly restored but much is in disrepair. As can be expected in this economy, funds are scarce. A similar situation exists at Mark Twain's gorgeous Victorian down the road in West Hartford. If you're in the area, visit them. It's worth it, and your ticket helps keep them on life support.

Of Wharton's 40 published books, I think I've only read The Age of Innocence and the suicidal sledding love story Ethan Frome. I plan on giving House of Mirth a shot this summer.


message 2: by Jennifer, hot tamale (new)

Jennifer | 141 comments Mod
great topic! i'll have to think on this some. oh! i've got one - i visited a friend of mine in oak park, a village outside chicago, and i saw the house where hemingway was born in 1899. it's a lovely victorian home. in fact, everything about oak park is magnificent - i highly recommend visiting there if ever in chicago.


message 3: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments Jennifer wrote: "great topic! i'll have to think on this some. oh! i've got one - i visited a friend of mine in oak park, a village outside chicago, and i saw the house where hemingway was born in 1899. it's a love..."

That I'd like to see. Nick Adams-land and all that. Finca Vigia, too. Sloppy Joe's, not so much.


message 4: by Patrick, The Special School Bus Rider (last edited May 04, 2009 07:31PM) (new)

Patrick (horrorshow) | 269 comments Mod
I live just 30 to 40 minutes away from Reading, PA where John Updike was born. I alway called that place a fine town to pass by at 70 miles per hour.

Stupid me, I typed in John Steinbeck. God forbid if the family in Grape of Wrath came from PA. Otherwise it would be Grape of Wrath complete with sicking dead babies jokes and fart jokes.

'It's dusty here allright. Let me clear out some of the dust.' (Pffffweet!)


message 5: by Jonathan, the skipper (new)

Jonathan | 609 comments Mod
. . . i spent a lot of time as a kid in steinbeck country-- monterey, watsomville, gilroy, that neck of the woods, and you can really feel steinbeck's inspiration . . . i also paid visits to nathaniel west's house, fante's bunker hill . . . and of course, as an overzealous adolescent north beach was my stomping ground: i'd stomp around in a serape vest and a beret with peter orlevsky's book of clean asshole poems in my pocket, trying to relive the beat life . . . i blush just thinking about it . . .


message 6: by Ry (last edited May 05, 2009 12:23AM) (new)

Ry (downeyr) | 173 comments James wrote: "I've always been interested in writer's houses, writer's bars and the places that may have influenced or informed a great piece of literature. Sloppy Joe's in Key West never did much for me but mo..."

It's funny that you mentioned Cambridge, because somewhere in Cambridge is a plaque on the bridge that Quentin Compson jumped off with flat-irons in his coat pockets. Anderson bridge, I think. It says something like "Drowned in the odour of honeysuckle. Quentin Compson dob-dod." It's pretty cool. You can actually find it on wikipedia.


message 7: by Hugh, aka Hugh the Moderator (new)

Hugh | 271 comments Mod
Great topic. Don't know why I was so fascinated by the house Keats' died in next to the Spanish Steps in Rome. It's horrifically overrun by tourists but the small upper floor is weirdly fascinating with (if I recall correctly) a small locket with a lock Keats' hair.

On a totally different level, there's Anne Frank's house in Amsterdam where just walking up the narrow staircase and knowing these people lived without leaving the upper rooms gives you a sudden catch in the throat.

For some strange reason in the world of author's homes, I vividly recall the boarding house where Thomas Wolfe lived in Asheville, NC. Seeing how humongous his coat is and seeing the refrigerator ON TOP OF WHICH he wrote his manuscripts is fascinating.

Sadly many old haunts of Algren's have been gentrified but you can still find a legit dive West on Division Street.

[And Jennifer, my friend in Oak Park used to give those tours of that house... wonder if he was there when you were. All of the nearby Frank Lloyd Wright homes are worth checking out if folks are comign through.)


message 8: by Michael, the Olddad (last edited Jun 23, 2009 07:45AM) (new)

Michael (olddad) | 255 comments Mod
Hugh wrote: "Great topic."

I’ve got one. My family lived on Lafayette Square in Savannah at one point. Flannery O`Connor’s childhood home is there, as well as the Cathedral across the square where she went to church and St. Vincent`s Grammar School which she attended as a young girl (though I think the later is no longer there).

Always felt her presence there; a little girl running through the parks, just out of the corner of my eye.



mm


message 9: by Patty, free birdeaucrat (last edited May 05, 2009 05:21PM) (new)

Patty | 896 comments Mod
I sort of feel like I'm cheating at this, because I live in New York. I work a block from Washington Irving's home, and kitty-corner from that is Pete's Tavern, where O. Henry wrote the Gift of the Magi.

But my favorite literary place is a plaque that I passed by one day by accident. I love it because it marks the spot where a building used to be but isn't any more. I like the transitoryness of it. I went out in the rain today and took a picture for you.




message 10: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments Very cool, Patty. Now I guess I have to bring my camera to the Algonquin. Better yet. I just may take a pic of Prescription for Love laying on the damned round table.


message 11: by Ry (last edited May 05, 2009 10:05PM) (new)

Ry (downeyr) | 173 comments Ry wrote: "James wrote: "I've always been interested in writer's houses, writer's bars and the places that may have influenced or informed a great piece of literature. Sloppy Joe's in Key West never did much..."

Below is the plaque I mentioned. Visual aides are always fun! :)

quentin compson plaque




message 12: by Brian, just a child's imagination (new)

Brian (banoo) | 346 comments Mod
James wrote: "Very cool, Patty. Now I guess I have to bring my camera to the Algonquin. Better yet. I just may take a pic of Prescription for Love laying on the damned round table."

yeah j.o... i'm thinking about a pilgrimage to leeanne's home and maybe the hospital.

on a more serious note, i have pamuk to thank for my trip to turkey. kawabata for my trip to japan. and those crazy russians for my future trip to crazy russia. actually it was the book war & peace that made me decide that russia had to be seen. i'm finding that reading certain writers encourages me to go and visit their countries. and i did the steinbeck country tour on a trip to california years ago. cannery row is just not cannery row anymore. but the countryside... the spirit of steinbeck can still be felt.

after russia i'm planning a trip to bainbridge island to look at the tub that writer evison spends so much time in. i just hope the author isn't using it when i photograph it.


message 13: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments That tub will be in the Smithsonian one day. Some pics of Edith's modest abode is on my profile (couldn't get them to load here).


message 14: by Jonathan, the skipper (new)

Jonathan | 609 comments Mod
. . . that tub will be in your basement if you want it, jimbo . . . i'm getting fat, i need a deeper one . . .


message 15: by Patrick, The Special School Bus Rider (new)

Patrick (horrorshow) | 269 comments Mod
I know an area in Philadelphia where Edgar Allen Poe slept in a hotel...I think it is on Germantown Avenue.


message 16: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments Patrick wrote: "I know an area in Philadelphia where Edgar Allen Poe slept in a hotel...I think it is on Germantown Avenue. "

I recently read Ackroyd's concise bio of Poe, and he absolutely belongs in the Lush Life thread, too.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

The first two are Boston walking tours. I'll try to remember the camera on my next trip into Mass General.

A signer of both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution, Franklin's colorful life and contributions as an author, entrepreneur, inventor, scientist, statesman and diplomat earned him the status as one of the most influential and recognizable of the Founding Fathers on both sides of the Atlantic.
What is less well known is that this remarkable life began as the 15th child of a tallow chandler in the Puritan town of Boston. Before his kite-flying days, young Franklin lived a humble Puritan life as a voracious reader, resourceful inventor, a printer's apprentice and with a sense of humor.
*******
Boston was the most important literary center in the United States and home to many of America's greatest writers. Our literary tour highlights the homes and haunts of such great Victorians as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Charles Dickens, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Individually, they were writers and poets without peer. Collectively, they made Boston the epicenter of American Letters.
*****

Boston Radio
http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/WBURRa...
*****

Thoreau at Walden Pond.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhP7PK...
*****

Lexington/Concord

Orchard House, the home of Louisa May Alcott and her family and setting for the beloved Little Women.

Colonial Inn, a functioning inn and historic landmark at the heart of the village green, the Inn was a part of the events of April 19, 1775 and was later home to Henry David Thoreau.

Old Manse, home of minister William Emerson, his grandson Ralph Waldo Emerson, and the honeymoon home of Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne.

Concord Museum holds a nationally significant historical collection including the famed Revere lantern, Emerson’s study, and Thoreau’s Walden desk.

The Wayside was home to the Alcotts, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Sidney.

Emerson House, where Ralph Waldo Emerson, foremost 19th century literary figure, lived and wrote from 1835 until his death in 1882. Original furnishings and family memorabilia are on display.




message 18: by Brian, just a child's imagination (new)

Brian (banoo) | 346 comments Mod
A few Russian references...



[image error]

Tsar's Cannon, Cathedral Square

"The Emperor entered the Cathedral of the Assumption. The crowd spread out again more evenly, and the clerk led Petya--pale and breathless--to the Tsar-cannon. Several people were sorry for Petya, and suddenly a crowd turned toward him and pressed round him. Those who stood nearest him attended to him, unbuttoned his coat, seated him on the raised platform of the cannon, and reproached those others (whoever they might be) who had crushed him."
War and Peace

[image error]

Patriarch's Pond

"At the hour of the hot spring sunset two citizens appeared at the Patriarch's Ponds."
The Master and the Margarita

[image error]

Tolstoy's House in Moscow

His writing room is located behind the top-right window.



message 19: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments This made my morning. In fact, I think a taste of vodka is in order.


message 20: by Hugh, aka Hugh the Moderator (new)

Hugh | 271 comments Mod
Brian, Thank you. I know have Tolstoy's house on my desktop monitor. Top right window, eh? Thanks for the inspiration.


message 21: by Patrick, The Special School Bus Rider (new)

Patrick (horrorshow) | 269 comments Mod
Wow, Tolstoy got a real sweet set up for his writings.


message 22: by Shel, ad astra per aspera (new)

Shel (shelbybower) | 946 comments Mod
Were you able to go in, Brian?

Wow, I would have just stood in there for a long time, same way I did in Rembrandt's studio - I had to be dragged out... at least it wasn't by a security guard, just my kids...


message 23: by Brian, just a child's imagination (last edited Aug 20, 2009 01:46AM) (new)

Brian (banoo) | 346 comments Mod
shel... oh yeah, i went in. it was filled with a bunch of grumpy old women who huffed and puffed and sprayed spittle every time we stepped out of line. his kids used to slide down the staircase on metal serving trays. and they even have leo's underwear on display (??!!)... you can see more of the moscow photos on facebook or here: http://web.me.com/brian_doucet/Russia... (but i didn't take pictures of his under garments.

i stuck a couple of short movies at the last site.

st. petersburg will probably be posted next week. i've got pictures of the hay market area... a bit of crime and punishment cues.

now back to the regularly scheduled programming.


message 24: by Keith (new)

Keith Dixon (keithwdixon) | 44 comments mo, here's one we ought to see:

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


message 25: by Ben, uneasy in a position of power; a yorkshire pudding (new)

Ben Loory | 241 comments Mod
i can almost see mildred in there baking pies...

actually, that's about 25 minutes from my house. it's a really depressing part of burbank... which is saying something...


message 26: by Matt, e-monk (new)

Matt Comito | 386 comments Mod
Ben wrote: "i can almost see mildred in there baking pies...

actually, that's about 25 minutes from my house. it's a really depressing part of burbank... which is saying something..."


no kidding - that's like saying 'it's a particularly hot part of Hell'



message 27: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments If anyone saw a man smacking his waterlogged camera outside the Chelsea Hotel, mumbling about Fiction Files, and Joseph O'Neil's Netherland, that was me.


message 28: by Martha (new)

Martha Kate | 198 comments I'm loving this thread...
Someone once told me the address of the little house in El Paso where Cormac McCarthy lived while writing the Border Trilogy - pretty nondescript. What I did love, though, was finding the graveyard in San Angelo that John Grady Cole stopped by on his way to Mexico. The man pays attention to geographic detail.

When I lived in Boston, I loved exploring the dusty nooks and crannies of Emily Dickinson's house in Amherst and also The Mount. I read somewhere that Mt. Greylock in North Adams was a visual inspiration for the whale in Moby Dick. Don't know how much of that I believe, but it was great to hike to the top and eat wild blueberry muffins at Bascomb Lodge. I also swam across Walden Pond. Twice.

On a related note, House of Mirth has been on my list for some time. I think I'll plan on reading it in August, after Dorkapalooza.


message 29: by Shel, ad astra per aspera (last edited Jun 22, 2009 05:57AM) (new)

Shel (shelbybower) | 946 comments Mod
While I lived in Annapolis, I stayed several times at the Robert Morris Inn where James Michener supposedly wrote Chesapeake A Novel. The inn itself was built prior to 1710.

The crab cakes are rumored to be the best on the shore due to the near total lack of breading in the recipe. They are pretty good, I must say, but for whole crabs there is no place better than Cantler's. As long as you don't mind getting your hands dirty.

Below is a view from one of the rooms.

[image error]


message 30: by Greg (new)

Greg Ippolito (gregippolito) | 52 comments Shel wrote: "While I lived in Annapolis, I stayed several times at the Robert Morris Inn where James Michener supposedly wrote Chesapeake A Novel...Below is a view from one of the rooms."


There's something inherently sad about the Chesapeake's beauty. Not sure what it is. But I always leave Maryland more depressed then when I arrived -- despite some phenomenal crab cakes in my belly.

G.



message 31: by Shel, ad astra per aspera (new)

Shel (shelbybower) | 946 comments Mod
Depends on which part of Maryland you're in, but I agree with you. The less inhabited areas of the shore have a ... melancholy to them. Maybe it's that the land and water are at the same level and everything is so calm there. It's such a quiet place.

Also, the lack of beachfront, or the fact that most of it is privately owned on those islands, keeps out the rowdy/partying beach people, unlike, say, Martha's Vineyard. That can be found in Ocean City, a place I have never been in all the years I lived in DC.

The mountains in Maryland, now that's a different story. Virginia, too. Just the other day I was sipping wine at a vineyard, looking at Sugarloaf Mountain, a cool breeze taking all of the punch out of a 90 degree day, with old friends talking about life 20 years ago... and the very next day I visited with my favorite high school teacher. Story for another thread.


message 32: by Michael, the Olddad (new)

Michael (olddad) | 255 comments Mod
Ladd Observatory, Brown University




"The late Prof. Upton of Brown, a friend of the family, gave me the freedom of the college obseratory, (Ladd Observatory) & I came & went there at will on my bicycle. Ladd Observatory tops a considerable eminence about a mile from the house. I used to walk up Doyle Avenue with my wheel, but when returning would have a glorious coast down it. (H.P. Lovecraft, Letter to Reinhardt Kleiner, 16 November 1916)

10 Barnes Street



This was the home of Lovecraft from April 1926 to May 1933, his most prolific period. This house’s address was listed as that of Dr. Marinus Bicknell Willett in The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.




message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

Flannery O'Connor and I were both born in Savannah, Georgia, which is the garden of good and evil according to one nonfiction writer.

O'Connor moved to Andalusia Farm in Milledgeville, GA during her last years. It's a pretty site, but her beloved peacocks & their descendants are gone now. (The caretaker told me they were removed during the '80s because they were just too much trouble.) I have a peacock feather from the gift shop; I may use it in some future magic ceremony -- perhaps for good, perhaps for evil.

http://www.andalusiafarm.org/




message 34: by Martyn (new)

Martyn | 299 comments does anybody know how to put pictures into these text boxes? I got lots of pictures to show of famous homes!


message 35: by Michael, the Olddad (new)

Michael (olddad) | 255 comments Mod
Martyn wrote: "does anybody know how to put pictures into these text boxes? I got lots of pictures to show of famous homes!"

Above the comment box (in which I typing right now), and to the right, is a link labeled "some htlml is ok". There is syntax in there for embedding pictures. Have at it!



message 36: by R.a. (new)

R.a. (brasidas1) | 79 comments If you enjoy "webs," you're going to love Edith's House of Mirth. Watch that Seldon; and, Bertha is quite a creation.

I'm here in Lowell, MA; and, I still can't understand why there isn't SOME kind of path, etc., for Eddie Poe since he spent quite a bit of time, here, toward the end--and even though it goes against his "Frog-pondian" rants.


I visited London's "Wolf House" when I was in CA--which, to me, was SO cool despite the cabin in the back selling some of his work and the signs warning against the rattlesnakes and the fire that left only the cement skeleton of a structure. But, maybe that's what was so cool. One's imagination pictured maybe what London was going for. If I remember correctly, London was already spiraling down when he was about done (or done) with "Wolf House."

Edith, of course, left us. Europe called. And, as I understand it, she was painfully aware and disheartened by the "new," "modernist" style that was taking shape.

Well, back to John Barleycorn.

Way cool topic !

--R.A.



message 37: by Martyn (new)

Martyn | 299 comments Michael wrote: "Martyn wrote: "does anybody know how to put pictures into these text boxes? I got lots of pictures to show of famous homes!"

Above the comment box (in which I typing right now), and to the righ..."


Thanks Michael!


message 38: by Martyn (last edited Jul 02, 2009 02:56AM) (new)

Martyn | 299 comments Where ever I go in the world, I always like to pay my respects to writers who I love and admire by taking pictures. I've even been lucky enough to sleep in one great writer's office (thanks Mr. Evison!)

I've travelled a fair bit...and always like to search out homes, cafes or cemeteries with literary connections...here's some pictures!



john keats house

Romantic poet John Keats lived in this house for two years before he died...it's here he wrote some of his most famous poems and had an affair with Fanny Brawne...he's the subject of a new Jane Campion movie 'Bright Star'


botswain's tomb


The above is the tomb Lord Byron had made for his beloved Newfoundland dog, Botswain...he wanted to be buried with him. Newstead Abbey is a grand pile.



dh lawrence's home in byron villas, Hampstead


DH Lawrence lived on the ground floor of this property in 1915, it's very close to Hampstead Heath. Apparently, Lawrence hated it very much.

DH Lawrence plaque

This a close-up of the blue plaque


orwell tag


George Orwell's residence in 1935. He wrote Coming Up For Air here and worked in a bookstore around the corner.


Orwell's house at Parliament Hill where he wrote Coming Up For Air

Orwell's house


shelley's grave in rome

The grave of Percy Bysshe Shelley in Rome


Katherine Mansfield home in Hampstead

Katherine Mansfield's home in Hampstead, London


mansfield plaque

Blue plaque on Katherine Mansfield's home




martello tower, sandycove


The Martello Tower at Sandycove, briefly the home of James Joyce, and used for the opening of the best novel ever written Ulysses






message 39: by Patrick, The Special School Bus Rider (new)

Patrick (horrorshow) | 269 comments Mod
Neat, it looks like a prison or something a writer could use to really focus on his work.


message 40: by Patty, free birdeaucrat (new)

Patty | 896 comments Mod
great pics Martyn!


message 41: by Shel, ad astra per aspera (new)

Shel (shelbybower) | 946 comments Mod
Those are awesome photos.

I have to admit that when I lived there I only went to Stratford-on-Avon. I doubt my parents would have known where to look for all of these great places.


message 42: by James (new)

James Othmer (jamespothmer) | 39 comments Great photos, everyone. I love this stuff.


message 43: by Michael, the Olddad (new)

Michael (olddad) | 255 comments Mod
Martyn wrote: "Where ever I go in the world, I always like to pay my respects to writers who I love and admire by taking pictures. I've even been lucky enough to sleep in one great writer's office (thanks Mr. Ev..."

Martyn - these are great! By the way, are you still keeping up with the Orwell "diaries"? Some of it has been a bit boring around-the-garden-how-many-eggs-have-we-gotten-from-the-hens stuff, but the war diaries have just ramped up; WWII war clouds on the horizon as described by George Orwell.

Shouldn't be missed folks at http://orwelldiaries.wordpress.com/

I read his diary everyday with breakfast.
mm


message 44: by Brian, just a child's imagination (last edited Aug 20, 2009 01:47AM) (new)

Brian (banoo) | 346 comments Mod
I'm currently STILL reading Anna Karenina and, yes, I do see an end in sight... there are more pages on my left than on my right. I read a huge chunk of this little novel while visiting both Moscow and St. Petersburg and thought I'd share. I reference several Russian books in the photos. I was able to visit the site of Bulgakov's Master and the Margarita, scenes from Tolstoy's War and Peace, Dostoevsky's neighborhood where Crime and Punishment took place, Pushkin's house where after a failed duel he died and a couple of others I'm probably forgetting. But sheesh... you could spend a month there on a literary tour and still not see everything. I didn't even come close to Chekhov or Gogol (though his Russian roots are in debate especially after the latest movie 'Taras Bulba'. Russia is truly a literary rich travel destination.

http://web.me.com/brian_doucet/Russia...


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

Wow! That is so cool Brian.


message 46: by Shel, ad astra per aspera (new)

Shel (shelbybower) | 946 comments Mod
Brian, very cool site -- VERY cool.

(Isn't Apple disabling these sites? I got a note about my family site.)


message 47: by Brian, just a child's imagination (new)

Brian (banoo) | 346 comments Mod
Shel wrote:
(Isn't Apple disabling these sites? I got a note about my family site.)"


(they're disabling the old sites and are going with this iWeb thing. looks the same to me. it's just published differently and easier... like it wasn't easy enough before)


message 48: by Christopher, Swanny (last edited Jul 08, 2009 05:46AM) (new)

Christopher Swann (christopherswann) | 189 comments Mod
I've never been in this house...and I've never read Gone with the Wind either...but I always thought this was kind of cool:

[image error]
Margaret Mitchell House

With Atlanta's modern skyscrapers and office buildings all around--that white marble mausoleum in the background is the new Federal Reserve Bank--this house just sticks out like a sore thumb. A nice visual reminder that, hey, writers and books are important.


message 49: by Bonita (new)

Bonita (NMBonita) | 120 comments It looks like the house in the new Pixar movie, "Up."


message 50: by Michael, the Olddad (new)

Michael (olddad) | 255 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "I'm currently STILL reading Anna Karenina and, yes, I do see an end in sight... there are more pages on my left than on my right. I read a huge chunk of this little novel while visiting both Moscow..."

WAY cool. And you picked a perfect time of year to go. Do you remember that action in The Idiot takes place on the summer soltice?

Again, WAY cool.


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