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Curley's Wife

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Alexandria I think that she deserved to die because of the fact that she was very slutty and had a husband but still decided to flirt with other men


Geoffrey Wow. How kind of you. So when people try to satisfy their libido outside of marriage, kill them off. Hooray, Taliban. You have the answer to the West`s decadence.


Kameron Kidder Geoffrey wrote: "Wow. How kind of you. So when people try to satisfy their libido outside of marriage, kill them off. Hooray, Taliban. You have the answer to the West`s decadence."

Ya your right other than the fact the Lenny Small is a little "out of his mind". Do body really deserved to die in this book except maybe curly.


Rachel I do not believe she deserved to die. I do not blame her for seeking attention or company with others (the men are her only choice b/c there are no other women on this ranch). She marries Curely as a last ditch effort to escape her home after two men have lied to her and deferred her dreams. Also, Curely is not a good husband (for crying out loud he walks around with a glove on to keep his hand soft--advertising it to all the other men, jerk!) Curely's wife also mentions that he's not a nice man when talking to Lennie, and considering his temper and desire for fights, this makes me worry that he's abusive to her. You could say, CW seems to be making the best out of a lousy situation.


Mickey I think Curley's wife was looking for simple companionship, just like some of the other men in the novel. (It's been a while since I read the book, so I'm fuzzy on names.) Steinbeck was showing how rare a friendship such as Lennie's and George's was by having the other characters be isolated from each other. Curley's wife was one of the most isolated, because any attempt on her part to connect with someone would be met with suspicion and fear of her husband. If I remember correctly, she simply wanted to have conversations with the men and maybe be admired by them, which is hardly grounds for capital punishment. I think everyone involved knew the situation would explode, but people are driven by the need to be with others. I think one of the strengths of the story is the motivations and desires of all the characters are very basic, human needs, such as feeling connected to others and that one's efforts "matter", but the situation made the meeting of such basic needs difficult and even dangerous.


Geoffrey Does it really matter whether she was a tart or was simply reaching out? You may have jumped to the conclusion she was a vamp as that was her depiction in the original movie version, but does it really matter? No one deserves to die because she wants a little hanky panky outside the conjugal bed.


Georgie Curley's wife is such a sad character - so sad that she doesn't even get to have her own name. A sweet, naive girl who did her best to get out of a horrible childhood but has victim written all over her.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* I wouldn't say she deserved to die (Rarely think that), but I couldn't stand her. Truly unlikeable character who just enjoyed spreading drama and misery.


Matilda L. I think Curley's wife is a interesting character. I think she didn't have a name, because she was so shallow. Not her backstory, but her character. What do you think of that?


haribo :D we had to study this book as part of our english exam this year. during this time, we found that curleys wife was misunderstood but this could have been due to the fact that she liked to try and gain attention from the men on the ranch as she wasnt being noticed from curley. Also the fact that she has no name shows that during the time period it was written; women weret seen as equal and this could be portrayed as her not having her own individuality and identity. Other characters show loneliness too, but curleys wife shows hers by dressing up and acting like a child. I dont think she did deserve to die as she was just telling lennie about her destroyed dreams and didnt she deserve to have a dream like george and lennie did?


Helen Georgie wrote: "Curley's wife is such a sad character - so sad that she doesn't even get to have her own name. A sweet, naive girl who did her best to get out of a horrible childhood but has victim written all ov..."

I'm sorry but there was a reason for her not having a name. It was John Steinbeck's way of showing us that she wasn't important to the story at all. And personally I don't think she was naive at all, that girl knew what she was doing and she was playing with fire.


Mickey Helen wrote: " there was a reason for her not having a name. It was John Steinbeck's way of showing us that she wasn't important to the story at all."

Wasn't her death the reason George shot Lennie in the end? How could you say that she's a minor character?


Geoffrey I'm sorry but there was a reason for her not having a name. It was John Steinbeck's way of showing us that she wasn't important to the story at all. And personally I don't think she was naive at all, that girl knew what she was doing and she was playing with fire.


Or more likely that the men in the camp did not consider her individuality but that she was only known as Curley`s wife. This would give cause to her flirtatious behaviour as she was trying to assert her own individuality and could do it only by her female allure.


Mariama Konneh Geoffrey i agree with you 100% i do believe though that if she really wanted to assert her own individuality she could do it in other ways besides messing with the men and upsetting curley. Especially the way she lead on and contributed to Lennie's mental lackings which sadly lead to her death.


Franchesca Guerrero I dont think she deserved to die, she seemed alone, young, insecure and I would have liked it if she had a name in the story. She probably did not even love her husband because she was forced to marry because of social circumstances, ie: this is what was expected of women. She reminds me of the character from Sex in the City, Samantha Jones.


haribo :D Mickey wrote: Wasn't her death the reason George shot Len..."

itotally agree, she is not a minor character but is the reason for the later chain of events.


Geoffrey Yes, but she was a limited character Mariama. She had nothing else going for her but her flirtations.

The others refer to her as CURLEY`s WIFE as a reminder to each other that she is taboo. She is the boss`s wife and it was their reminder to each other that she was off limits. More than likely her sexual frustration resulted from the bad lovemaking of a macho jerk.


Heather Curley's wife certainly flirted with disaster, but I don't think she deserved to die. I mean I know people with fewer redeeming qualities than Curley's wife. There are those who are able to be rehabilitated and those who are not.
Anyway...
Due to the timing of her "confessions" to Lennie, I think perhaps the author intended for the reader to sort of identify somewhat with Curley's wife and her "issues" (as we all have them). Yet, Steinbeck gave her no first name. Thus, not wanting the reader to identify too much. I think this lends to helping the reader to understand the struggle George must feel when he is contemplating shooting Lennie. Question. Did George really shoot Lennie because he had killed Curley's wife or because he wanted/needed to be free of the "burden of Lennie" and his "messing things up" (& their plan of livin' off the fatta the lan'") all the time? And here's more food for thought... I think maybe Candy and/or the nigger (I'm sorry, I can't think of his name, nor his job) knowing about George/Lennie's plan and wanting a part of it significantly changes the "fatta the lan'" plan. If Lennie's still alive, George (his conscience what it is) must go with/take care of Lennie. If Lennie is dead, George can continue to stay at the ranch with Candy (who has $300 saved up) until they have enough for the "fatta the lan'" plan. Maybe he'd include the nigger, maybe not. What are your thoughts?


Chris I believe George killed Lennie because he knew Curley was going to catch him and make him suffer before being killed. I don't believe George killed Lennie out of cruelty, rather he loved him so much that he wanted Lennie not to suffer or know fear.....for if George were hunted down by Curley, he would be terrified, and Lennie truly did not understand the depth of his actions. George realized that Lennie would never be understood, or safe without George. He also knew that he might not always be there to protect him, which scared George. In closing, George's love for Lennie is why he decided to kill him.


Geoffrey Chris`comment is the obvious one. The author himself expresses it I believe.


message 21: by Mickey (last edited Aug 03, 2011 02:53PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mickey I think we might be talking about two different concepts here, and so, talking at cross purposes. I think we are confusing the terms 'minor character' and 'flat or one-dimensional character'. She has an important role in the action, as the ending could not happen without her contribution, so (in my opinion) she can not be a minor character. It's pretty debatable on whether she has a fully-formed personality or is shown as an individual. (I think she qualifies. We do hear her side of the story and can sympathize with her plight.) But, like I said, I can see where there would be room to disagree on that point.


Richard Duque I didnt read all the comments/arguements so i'm sorry for repeating something...that's if you guys mentionjed it. Dont you notice how she doesnt have a name? Author's opinion could possibly be that she isnt worth giving a name....at those times women didnt have much power compared to men. And i read the first comment that said she was slutty.....i dont agree with it. i realize she is the only girl at the barn....she has no friends and that acting in such manner could get her close to someone. What i'm trying to say is that she is bored and it's hard for her to get close to a guy without them calling her a slut......notice it is the guys making all those comments in the book. she doesnt do anything but talk to them. they are the ones that state she is a slut......i mean, she has no choice...she lives in a barn with a bunch of guys and no girls around. She doesnt even like Curley.....well yea, thats basically my opinion.


Sarah Rusinowski she's unhappy with her life, she had aspirations to become an actress and everyone on the ranch looks at her as if she's despicable for searching for friendship or companionship. the fact that she resorted to talking to lennie, even though she was aware of the danger (she was scared of him when she found out he killed the puppy, but ignored it) makes it clear that she was lonely and pitiable. she didn't deserve to die, and i think that she was the most powerful character in the book.


Karen I don't remember Steinbeck as being very good at depicting female characters at the time he wrote this book.They're always one dimensional. He did get better at it, but CW was a catalyst to move the story along. Something had to happen so George would destroy the only thing he had that mattered to him and become as lonely and unconnected as the other characters. I don't think CW deserved to die, but that she had to.


Geoffrey Richard, we addressed the issue of why she had no name. Why bring up the issue again, unless you are not satisfied with any of our answers? What do you think is the reason?


message 26: by Angie (last edited Sep 30, 2011 07:27AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angie She was a frustrated person apart from feeling isolated from the world. She acted as a spoiled girl when she wanted to attract men acting naively just to provoke a fight between them and Curley.

Flirting with other men caused that Curley went into a fight with others, which make her feel important and valuable even if she wasn't. Maybe she knew the danger of being with Lennie, but she was blind of making Curley jealouse making her feel important (Inferiority Complex maybe).

It's like when a woman makes a scheme where two men fight for her because she wants to feel "important". The most typical one is when a girl makes fight two best friends.

I don't know if she really deserved to die, but killing her was the pivot to cause all what came.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Curly's wife wasn't bad, she had to be the way she was. She was part of the microcosm of people during the depression. She was all the women who didn't have anything to do because the few jobs were given to men, and she couldn't take being alone.


Yasmine Fairchild I think Culry's wife wasn't nearly as slutty as the men portaited her to be. And what the hell was shesupposed to do? She was cooked up in a farm house all day, depressed about not being an actress and had no friends in sight. She was just trying to make friends or have a conversation with someone. And clearly Curly wasn't giving her enogh attention with his hand in that glove full of vasseline! At least to me it sounded like Curly wanted to have some private time with his wife. And appearently she had different feelings and wanted to interact with people other than her loving husband. And maybe because she was so attractive made the work men think that she was a whore, because the me were nervuos around her. I definetly don't think she deserved to die like that. Lonelyness and despiration caused her to walk into that death trap with Lennie.


Deborah Alexandria wrote: "I think that she deserved to die because of the fact that she was very slutty and had a husband but still decided to flirt with other men"

That seems a little harsh. People are often flawed. Everyone has their moments of stupidity, weakness, selfishness and sin. If death were a fit punishment for failing, no one would live long enough to have the moments of clarity, kindness and greatness that also define humanity.

Further, books where people deserve to die because of their flaws are less interesting than books where people can be broken or wrong and yet we still root for them. Also, if she simply deserves to die, then that scene and the results lose meaning, don't they?


Deborah Kimberley wrote: "I think Curley's wife is a interesting character. I think she didn't have a name, because she was so shallow. Not her backstory, but her character. What do you think of that?"


I never looked at it that way, but that is a really interesting idea.


message 31: by Robyn (new) - added it

Robyn travers curly's wife didn't just happen to be a slut , if you think about it she is just lonely and wants to be noticed.As curly expects her to just sit and wait for him to come home,that is unfair , i know i would hate that. Maybe she didn't have an official name as it was to represent how little women meant to society back then.


Aycal Herondale i think Curley's wife is misunderstood. ok she does flirt with the guys at the ranch and act like a 'tart' however this is purely because of how lonely she is. she gets no respect from her husband so she seeks it elsewhere. her dreams were far from reality but the only future plans she has. now she has no hope or nothing to look at for the future. i don't think she deserved to die, however i think it was kinda for the best as her life wouldn't be any better then what it was. she would never truly live and get the respect and attention she wanted.


Aycal Herondale Robyn wrote: "curly's wife didn't just happen to be a slut , if you think about it she is just lonely and wants to be noticed.As curly expects her to just sit and wait for him to come home,that is unfair , i kno..."

i totally agree with you. i think that her not having an official name and being called a 'tart' or offensive names like that illustrates the lack of respect that women had from society. they didn't mean anything back then, they had no rights to speak or do as they desired. even the other women mentioned in this book don't have respectful job; as shown in the book they work in a brothel, which again demonstrates their status in society.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* Dont think the author had her die because she deserved it, it was just a chain of events for the books story.

Also, not seeing the lack of respect thing either. It was clear from the personality he showed that she was one of those troublemakers. There are women like that - and men too - and they generally cause the downhill of a few people because of their actions having consequences.


Zainab I tend to think that John Steinbeck chose for Curley's wife to die as an example to show how women were treated. Throughout the whole book she is not refered to by her name because she /belongs/ to her husband, Curley.

She didn't deserve to die, she was misunderstood and craved company which she didn't get from her husband.


Erica Helen wrote: "Georgie wrote: "Curley's wife is such a sad character - so sad that she doesn't even get to have her own name. A sweet, naive girl who did her best to get out of a horrible childhood but has victi..."

I agree. I don't believe anyone in this story deserves to die. This girl needed and craved attention, after so long of being someone everyone wanted her to be, she thought it was time for her to get the love and affections she wanted. However this isn't to say that she's the sharpest knife in the set. She did know what she was getting into she was warned time and time again. She should've known better than to go looking for a disaster.


message 37: by Robyn (new) - added it

Robyn travers Erica wrote : I agree. I don't believe any one in this story deserves to die. This girl needed and craved attention .......

You said she was looking for disaster , causing trouble was the only way to make people ( particularly Curly ) to notice her , if you really think about it ... It was a plead for he as she was really lonely . Then add on the fact she was presumed useless because she was a women in society.


message 38: by Simon (new) - rated it 1 star

Simon grl shoulda been smrtr


Erica Simon wrote: "grl shoulda been smrtr"

Lol


Erica Robyn wrote: "Erica wrote : I agree. I don't believe any one in this story deserves to die. This girl needed and craved attention .......

You said she was looking for disaster , causing trouble was the only wa..."

That makes sense. Seems like she's pleading.


message 41: by Sam (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sam McGraw I feel bad for Curley's wife, for she was being discriminated against from the very beginning. She was forced to stay in the house all the time and had no friends whatsoever. I don't blame her for teying to reach outside of her world, even if it meant being a little flitatious with the other men. If Curley was cruel to his wife, she should have every right to find another man who could protect her from her abusive husband and actually care for her. She didn't actually deserve to die, but in reality, who really deserves to die? Everyone thinks of themselves as a good person, or at least they should. Curleys wife was just desperate for a little attention and love that she wasn't going to find anywhere else, and she just happened to choose Lennie. Sure, she made some bad decisions, but who doesn't? I feel pity for Mrs. Curley, because she just had no one to interact with or talk to, so I do not blame her in the least for trying to get a little attention.


message 42: by CJ (new) - rated it 5 stars

CJ Scurria Whoa. Well I think that she was a kind and caring character at the core. She was unfortunately like someone that was property. . . hence she had no name.

I don't think she deserved to be killed off. It was a sad "event" and Lennie should have known his strength I guess. . .


Hannah Curley's wife is really a victim and doesn't deserve to die, it's just an essential part of the story. She looks outside of her marriage for love because she doesn't have that with Curley. Her relationship isn't a happy one (she says herself that she doesn't 'like; Curley), Curley is oppressive, violent and mean and his wife, being the only woman on the ranch, is completely justified in trying to talk to the other men. She's just lonely.


message 44: by CJ (new) - rated it 5 stars

CJ Scurria Curley's wife is more like a victim in her relationship (and then apparently to Lennie_) than a character what deserves any comeuppance.


James Powell Alexandria wrote: "I think that she deserved to die because of the fact that she was very slutty and had a husband but still decided to flirt with other men"

Really? The death penalty for flirting?


Deborah Jamesepowell wrote: "Alexandria wrote: "I think that she deserved to die because of the fact that she was very slutty and had a husband but still decided to flirt with other men"

Really? The death penalty for flirting?"


Damn skippy son. Of course, I blame her husband. If he'd chained her to the stove and strapped on a chastity belt this never would have happened!


message 47: by Ascel (new)

Ascel Kadhem I think she deserved a name! What a sexist that Steinbeck.


message 48: by Cody (new) - rated it 4 stars

Cody I wouldn't entirely say that she deserved to die but she did plenty of flaws that would warrant bad karma. Saying that she deserved to die though is not "Taliban" merely an overreaction to adultery. She was not only flirting but Steinbeck leads us to believe she is not against cheating and more than likely has before. But with a husband like Curly can you really blame her?


message 49: by CJ (last edited Mar 27, 2012 10:45AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

CJ Scurria Ascel wrote: "I think she deserved a name! What a sexist that Steinbeck."

I think to not give her a name was probably to make a quiet point about sexism.

To Curley, she was not just his wife. She was his property.

And she didn't deserve to die. . .


Olivia Just because she was unsatisfied with her marriage and decided to seek outside "comfort" does not mean she deserved to die. I also don't think Steinbeck was a sexist for not giving her a name. I think it was actually genius because of the fact that Curly's wife hated being thought of as property, and by only referring to her as Curly's wife and not a name, that is exactly what she became, property.


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