Insurgent (Divergent, #2) Insurgent discussion


73 views
Failing Initiation and Becoming Factionless

Comments Showing 1-8 of 8 (8 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Mirkat One aspect of the Divergent/Insurgent world-building I had trouble accepting was the idea that parents would just allow their children to become factionless. It seems to me it goes against basic human nature not to insist that their children be given some type of second chance, whether that meant a return to their home faction or a chance to choose a different one. It's like these characters just think, "Ah, well, easy come, easy go!" I'm curious whether other readers had the same thought.


message 2: by Mairead (last edited Jun 12, 2013 09:15AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mairead Yeah kind of. But I think it was against the rules to let them back to their past faction. I guess thats why the choosing ceremony is such a big deal. But I think it is more unfair on the Dauntless because it is such a risk. You have to be in the top ten or your factionless and they have no warning about it.


message 3: by Emily (new) - added it

Emily I think one of the main points of the book is that the concept of family is very different in this society- it's faction before blood, after all. I'm sure it would be devastating for the parents, but likely they just accept that that's how society works. In real life, parents have this idea that their children, typically, are always their responsibility- but in the world Divergent sets up, you would have children knowing that there was a very real possibility that they would leave your life completely at 16. It's a completely different family structure.


Mirkat Mairead wrote: "You have to be in the top ten or your factionless and they have no warning about it.

That's another factor that I had trouble with. Faction-choosing is presented as such a big deal, as you note. But the whole thing is also shrouded in secrecy and the initiates really don't know what they're getting into. You'd think that their schools would have a system of faction-guidance counseling.


Mirkat Emily wrote: " In real life, parents have this idea that their children, typically, are always their responsibility- but in the world Divergent sets up, you would have children knowing that there was a very real possibility that they would leave your life completely at 16. It's a completely different family structure.

This is true--it's just hard for me to accept that human beings would ever get to a point where they'd just take these things in stride. It's the old disbelief getting suspended so hard it breaks, I guess. ;)


Mairead Mirkat wrote: "Mairead wrote: "You have to be in the top ten or your factionless and they have no warning about it.

That's another factor that I had trouble with. Faction-choosing is presented as such a big dea..."


Yeah because it's a huge decision


message 7: by Mochaspresso (last edited Jun 12, 2013 08:18PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Mochaspresso I have a close personal friend who married a jewish man and his family "sat shiva" and refused to acknowledge them or the children that they had for years. (Please, I don't want anyone to be offended unnecessarily. I fully realize that this is not "the norm" and I'm not trying to imply that it is.) They were so against inter-racial and inter-faith marriage that they disowned their own son.

I got the impression that faction was everything in Divergent's society and I thought that parent's allegiance to the faction was so strong that they considered a child choosing outside their born faction as the ultimate betrayal.


Mirkat Hm.... Interesting perspective, Mochaspresso. Though I can't help thinking that even if an initiate chose his/her "home" faction and failed for some reason, the parents would still just accept it.


back to top