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Debate Club > DEBATE - Dr. Seuss, good for kids?

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message 1: by Mathew (new)

Mathew Bookworm Smith | 686 comments Is Dr. Seuss good for kids?


message 2: by Mathew (new)

Mathew Bookworm Smith | 686 comments He makes up words. Then when my kids start making up words I have to be the bad guy and shoot them down. "Follow the rules kids or you'll never make it...don't bring up Dr. Suess again!"

He also gave the kids the idea of jumping on me...Hop on Pop
I was almost hospitalized. I filed assault charges on the oldest one.

So, Dr. Seuss has caused my children to speak inproperly AND have a criminal record.


message 3: by John (new)

John (noel_efturn) | 110 comments Bookworm wrote: "He makes up words. Then when my kids start making up words I have to be the bad guy and shoot them down. "Follow the rules kids or you'll never make it...don't bring up Dr. Suess again!"

He also g..."



My Drum Tummy's Numb, and I turned out all right.


message 4: by Allison (new)

Allison Hawn (allisonhawn) | 19 comments I actually used "Fox in Socks" to train away my downtown Atlanta, Georgia Southern accent (rather grating) when I moved to the Northwest. It saved me from constantly being misunderstood and having people want to deduct 10 I.Q. points every time I opened my mouth. So, yes, let your kids practice good diction with his books!


message 5: by Melki (last edited Jun 12, 2013 07:06AM) (new)

Melki | 3512 comments Mod
Many of the elementary schools in the US celebrate Dr. Seuss Day by serving green eggs and ham. (After a mountain of paperwork has been filled out so that kids with allergies won't sue the school if they die.) THIS is how my youngest son, aka "World's Pickiest Eater," learned to eat eggs. Yes, they DO have to be dyed green, but at least he's getting some protein.

There's also the rather disconcerting vision of a school full of kids wearing red and white striped hats to contend with...but I say, Bring on the Seuss!


message 6: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Cohen | 69 comments Dr. Seuss has taught millions of kids to read. They've been introduced to rhyming. He's also taught them to play with words. He's a national treasure.


message 7: by John (new)

John (noel_efturn) | 110 comments Kathy wrote: "Dr. Seuss has taught millions of kids to read. They've been introduced to rhyming. He's also taught them to play with words. He's a national treasure."

And to think that I saw it on Mulberry Street!


message 8: by Mathew (new)

Mathew Bookworm Smith | 686 comments I believe his manipulation of words rendering them at times almost unreadable, even to us adults, takes away from the story/message.
For eg. The Lorax. Last year my daughter's class did a whole project on the Lorax; read the book, watched the movie, etc.
In the end I asked her what it was about?
"uh, cutting down the trees, for the whogga-zee-zees"

No, it was a sad tale about environmental degradation and corporate greed...not the whogga-zee-zees if you please.

I told her, next time you want to read a good book by a doctor, pick up a Dr. Phil book Dr. Phil Getting Real by Phillip C. McGraw


message 9: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
"I'm Yertle the Turtle, oh marvelous me,
for I am the king of all that I see."

You know, that rivals Shakespeare for use of language, compression of a whole story into a couplet. . .


message 10: by Ubiquitous (new)

Ubiquitous Bubba (ubiquitousbubba) I liked that one Dr. Phil book that described the turmoil, confusion, and conflict between groups of Plain Bellied Oprahs and Star Bellied Oprahs.


message 11: by John (new)

John (noel_efturn) | 110 comments Bookworm wrote: "I believe his manipulation of words rendering them at times almost unreadable, even to us adults, takes away from the story/message.
For eg. The Lorax. Last year my daughter's class did a whole pr..."


Kids are very literal. You have to teach them about symbolism, allegory, and metaphor. Except for a few made-up names, there wasn't wasn't very much unreadable stuff in Gulliver's Travels, but even high school kids miss a good deal of the satire with out a knowledgeable and caring teacher making them answer a few leading questions and then getting them involved in a discussion. Either your daughter's teacher was an idiot and expected them to get it without any directed discussion, or your daughter wasn't paying attention and the teacher let her get away with it, i.e. the teacher is an idiot. Go to the school and ask for your money back.


message 12: by Melki (new)

Melki | 3512 comments Mod
conflict between groups of Plain Bellied Oprahs and Star Bellied Oprahs.

ROTFL


message 13: by Mathew (new)

Mathew Bookworm Smith | 686 comments There's a Wocket in My Pocket! just another excuse for my son to have his hand in his pants! It's tough enough trying to explain to a four year old boy that it is not appropriate to do certain things while walking through the mall without a witty book to counter me.
"no, no, there is a wocket in there!"
"That's not a wocket son. And if it is, only let the wocket out in the privacy of your bedroom please"


message 14: by John (new)

John (noel_efturn) | 110 comments Bookworm wrote: "There's a Wocket in My Pocket! just another excuse for my son to have his hand in his pants! It's tough enough trying to explain to a four year old boy that it is not appropriate to do certain thin..."

A four-year old, jingling his change! Oh horrors! Do something, quick, or the boy will go blind before he turns 10. Ban Dr. Seuss lest we turn into a nation of chicken chokers and monkey spankers. And don't you girls sit there looking all smug; I know all about "double-clicking" your mouse.

Spare the child and spoil the rod (so to speak), that's my motto.


message 15: by Melki (new)

Melki | 3512 comments Mod
description


message 16: by Mathew (new)

Mathew Bookworm Smith | 686 comments The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
I have a friend who is a vet. How many stories does she have of cats brought in to her clinic with head and neck injuries b/c some bookworm of a kid thought they'd take the Doctor seriously and put a hat on their cat...no matter how much squishing is involved.
PETA is all over this one, check their website, I'm sure it's on their list of banned books.

Same goes for Fox in Socks by Dr. Seuss . WWF has documented cases of fox carcasses found with socks on their paws. The poor creatures are at a disadvantage out there in the wild with socks on. They rustle in the leaves and scare away game, leaving the foxes to slowly starve and wither away.


message 17: by Rebecca (last edited Jun 25, 2013 06:25PM) (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
Ah. I thought the problem for the foxes in soxes was that their tongues were tied in knots.


message 18: by John (new)

John (noel_efturn) | 110 comments Whether it’s a scraggle-foot Mulligatawny or a wild-haired Iota (from “the far western part of south-east North Dakota”).


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