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message 1: by Tracey (new)

Tracey Smith | 84 comments How do you promote your work? I'd love to start a conversation with my fellow authors to learn what methods have worked best for you. Paid advertising? If so, where? Bloggers interviews? Reviews? What has been your experience, good or bad, in the wide world of book promotions?


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

A very good question. I have been using social media: Facebook; Twitter; Linkedin; Goodreads of course; Authors.com; e-mail to real friends - i.e. people I have known personally for years; messages to on-line friends etc. Regrettably with no success up to now. I did a one day free book offer (mine is an e-book with Kindle) but only had 45 downloads. Although I do not like public exposure I have granted an on-line interview but that does not appear to have brought any additional traffic. The fact I only have one published book at present and that an autobiography may be a contributing factor. In view of all the above I will be very interested to read what has worked for others. I propose to undertake a two day free offer this Thursday (13th) and Friday (14th) so we will see what that brings forth.


message 3: by Chris (new)

Chris The Story Reading Ape (chrisgr) Tanya wrote: "A very good question. I have been using social media: Facebook; Twitter; Linkedin; Goodreads of course; Authors.com; e-mail to real friends - i.e. people I have known personally for years; message..."

Tanya,

To help with your promo, I've included it on my blog about new (to me) authors, under FREE As Dated :)
http://www.thestoryreadingapeblog.com

After this promo period, I will transfer it to READ True Stories, so you continue to get publicity :)


message 4: by Tracey (new)

Tracey Smith | 84 comments I've used the Kindle free promo days too. I've found that running it over a weekend gets the most downloads. I've had anywhere from several hundred to a couple thousand free downloads over the past few years through various free promo weekends. I didn't really see that translating into sales until I released the second and third book in a series. If I ran the first book free then I would see an increase in sales on the next two books. One thing that really irritated me recently was that I offered my new release free for a few days in hopes of garnering reviews. One reader communicated with me on FB that they downloaded my book free, read it, loved it and tried to post a review only to be told by Amazon they couldn't post a review because they didn't "buy" it. However others have been able to post Amazon reviews without ever having downloaded the book from Amazon, ie free copies that I've emailed out for reviews. So I have no idea what algorithm Amazon is using to decide who can and can't post reviews, but that was really irritating. Right now I'm trying a paid advertising promotion with BookDaily. Excerpts from all four of my books are available on that site, which were uploaded for free. People can read the excerpts and then decided if they want to click through to buy it. I monitored the "views" for the first month and saw that each books excerpt averaged around 65 views. I then decided to pay the $49 for my new release to be advertised, meaning my excerpt is actually emailed out to people (they promise 25,000 emails to be sent). The emails are only sent to people who have subscribed to the service (free) and indicated which genres they prefer. So far they've sent out a total of 11,887 emails, 1621 have been opened and 226 people have actually clicked through to read more. However I've only seen 5 sales of this book since the promo started in early June. And those may or may not have anything to do with this promo. So I'm still undecided on whether or not it has been worthwhile.


message 5: by Mel (new)

Mel Parish (mel_parish) | 11 comments Tracey wrote: "I've used the Kindle free promo days too. I've found that running it over a weekend gets the most downloads. I've had anywhere from several hundred to a couple thousand free downloads over the past..."

Your comment about not being able to review books you downloaded for free is interesting - it's not the first time I've heard that in the last few weeks. I did a free couple of days and got a reasonable amount of downloads but have had no reviews from it. I'm beginning to wonder about the worth of the free days though as I think people are just downloading the books because they are free and have so many on their readers now that the chance they will pick a particular book to read at any point is miniscule - which means while a book appears to be getting visibility from the free days, in fact it is not.

There is also the issue that some people are now waiting to see if a book available on Amazon Prime goes free rather than buying it.


message 6: by Tracey (new)

Tracey Smith | 84 comments I have noticed increased sales of books in a series when the first book is offered free, but beyond that I don't see a whole lot of exposure coming from it. And very few reviews have come as a result of the free promos.
With regard to reviews I've also noticed that amazon will randomly delete a few here and there and for an indie author every review counts!
So beyond that, has anyone found something that works? Any paid advertising that has shown verifiable results? Has anyone paid for Kirkus reviews for the magazine exposure that it offers?


message 7: by Judith (new)

Judith Post | 391 comments I think I got really lucky, but when I offered the first book in my series for free on Kindle, I paid to advertise the free days on Book Bub. It was only $90 for urban fantasy, but each genre is a different price (depending on how many people have signed up to get notices about deals). I had a great response and went from 11 reviews to 26. (I have no idea how amazon's review policy actually works, so can't answer why they took those reviews and don't take others). I don't know if Book Bub works for anyone else, but it was great for me. I think it helps to have done some of the "brand" name stuff first--Twitter, blog, & Goodreads, though. It all adds up. And it helps to have more than one book online.


message 8: by Tracey (new)

Tracey Smith | 84 comments I'll have to look into Book Bub and see what they offer :)


message 9: by Judith (new)

Judith Post | 391 comments Have you read Lindsay Buroker's blog? She gives great advice on how to promote your writing. At least, I think so:)
http://www.lindsayburoker.com/

If you scroll through her posts, there's one on places to advertise when you offer free days on amazon.


message 10: by Tracey (new)

Tracey Smith | 84 comments Great thanks for the link!


message 11: by Judith (new)

Judith Post | 391 comments I like Kristen Lamb's links too. Here, just in case you haven't tried her yet.

http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/


message 12: by Thomas (new)


message 13: by Judith (new)

Judith Post | 391 comments I liked this post, Thomas. I do think an author has to like and believe in himself, but also think a writer wants readers to discover his work. And they can't if they never find it. There's a balance. A writer has to stay true to herself and work to improve her skill, but she also needs to somehow market her work to let people know it's there. I don't know if "likes" accomplishes that, though. Haven't tried that.


message 14: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Hill | 8 comments Hi, Judith:

Thanks very much for your comments. Yes, indie authors walk a fine line; indeed there is a grey area when it comes to marketing and self-publishing. The mistake that a lot of authors make is thinking social media is some magical tool that will instantly transport them to an adoring public. It takes a lot of energy and faith in yourself. If you can't get to that point first, you online presence won't matter much.


message 15: by Judith (new)

Judith Post | 391 comments Couldn't say it better myself. Actually, your wording was awesome!


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