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General Chat - anything Goes > Amazon and gender stereotyping!

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Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments A friend has posted this on Facebook.


Interesting: Look for toys on amazon.co.uk and you find toys, sorted by age or interest. Look for toys on amazon.de and they are sorted by gender ("toys for boys, toys for girls") - guess, which gender gets the really interesting one??

I'm angry and I'm writing a complaint!


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Have sent them an email. Will update when (if) I get a reply.


message 3: by Elle (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments I don't even understand why people categorise toys into gender. Not one person can honestly say they played with 'girl' or 'boy' toys their entire lives.


Frankly I enjoyed both and my parents were not the stupid kind to disallow me from enjoying 'boys' toys


message 4: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 25061 comments Kids will choose what they want to play with and discard those bought unsuitably.

In spite of my protests, my granddaughters love pink stuff.

I refused to buy my son a toy gun. He shot me regularly with a banana.

The kids will sort it out for themselves.


Vanessa (aka Dumbo) (vanessaakadumbo) | 8703 comments My favourite toys were 'boys' toys - cars, a crane and my own old hammer with some wood and nails. I did have a couple of dolls but they weren't nearly as interesting.


message 6: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments Elle wrote: "I don't even understand why people categorise toys into gender. Not one person can honestly say they played with 'girl' or 'boy' toys their entire lives.


Frankly I enjoyed both and my parents wer..."


I can honestly say I did only play with boys' toys. I mean who wants a doll when you can have a robot that turns into a car :)


message 7: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments Patti (Ogre for Hire) wrote: "A friend has posted this on Facebook.


Interesting: Look for toys on amazon.co.uk and you find toys, sorted by age or interest. Look for toys on amazon.de and they are sorted by gender ("toys for ..."


I'm probably wrong on this, but isn't the gender thing something to do with the way the German language is structured rather than a 'normal' gender classification? Or am I barking up the wrong tree?


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Wrong tree there RMF

It's all about the way Amazon is gender stereotyping on the .de site.

Here's their piss poor excuse of a reply.

Thanks for taking the time to send us your comments on "gender stereotyping ". I have passed your message along to the team involved with future development of our Communities features. I know they will want to hear your thoughts and suggestions.

If you want to find out more about this or other Amazon.co.uk features, please visit our Amazon.co.uk Site Features Help pages:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/custo...

I hope this helps. We look forward to seeing you again soon.

Did I solve your problem?

If yes, please click here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/rsvp-y?c=txdv...

If no, please click here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/rsvp-n?c=txdv...

To contact us about an unrelated issue, please visit the Help section of our website.

Warmest regards,


Jay-me (Janet)  | 4325 comments That sounds almost the same as the reply I got yesterday about a kindle book that I returned - returned because there was only half of it there, & they were passing my comments on to a different team.


Re toys - I had a train set, cricket bat & one of my dolls was Virgil from Thunderbirds.


message 10: by Jud (new)

Jud (judibud) | 18537 comments I had my little ponies, puppy in my pocket, polly pocket I did enjoy playing with my brothers Lego though and his skaletrix (no idea how to spell it)


Rosemary (grooving with the Picts) (nosemanny) | 9058 comments We bought my girls lots of lego, plastic toolkits and a train set when they were little. They did play with them, but they liked their barbies better. Or the barbies were incorporated into the lego and transported around on the trains. They were also apparently magnetically attracted to anything Pink, despite my best intentions! Kids will figure it out for themselves.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Anyone else recalling the conversation we had with Maureen when she was unsure about buying a toy kitchen set for her son? :(

Now I'm pissed off and sad.

I miss her.


message 13: by Jams (new)

Jams Roses (jamesross) | 33 comments My boy's mum bought him a small pushchair and doll once, and I was a little surprised to be honest. But he loved that dolly, and the pushchair made a great footrest when I sat on the sofa. I love being a dad.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Boys need to learn nurturing through play just as girls do.


message 15: by Jams (new)

Jams Roses (jamesross) | 33 comments Patti (Ogre for Hire) wrote: "Boys need to learn nurturing through play just as girls do."

Indeed. And Mani (my son) is lovely, and loving and caring, but this doesn't come from his toys, this comes from me and his mum, his environment.


Rosemary (grooving with the Picts) (nosemanny) | 9058 comments At nursery school, the child who most enjoyed the play house in the classroom (tidying the kitchen, setting the table, "cooking") was a boy - he was the son of the local (Italian) chip shop owner. He was also the most popular little boy with the girls!
Recently I've seen quite a few wee boys pushing along dollies in buggies.


message 17: by Beverley (new)

Beverley Carter | 199 comments I don't think this sort of stereotyping is restricted to Amazon, although theirs does seem particularly blatant. When my daughters were small, I was fascinated to see how the youngest one always went straight to the section she wanted in the Argos book - this is before she could read. I asked her how she did it and she replied that it was simple - she just looked for the pink pages. I hadn't even noticed that the pages had different colour backgrounds, but she had and she had also learnt that the toy babies and teddies were all in the pink pages, so she didn't bother looking elsewhere.

All was not lost though - she did go through a Bob the Builder phase and had all the toys and duvet set to match, while her sister went through a Doctor Who phase, during which time she was most put out to find that there was an abundance of boys tops and pyjamas with Doctor Who on but nothing whatsoever designed for girls and she certainly was not going to start wearing boys clothes. She settled in the end for a Doctor Who schoolbag, only to have her classmates ask her why she had a boy's bag.

Where does it end?

PS - I loved my Scalectrix. I had the minis which were faster than my brother's formula ones. I also had a lovely Hornby train set and made some great plaster buildings and bushes out of painted bits of sponge. I've got three younger brothers and I can remember us all sitting around the dining table at weekends making Airfix kits. After making a really bad job of a spitfire, I ended up sticking (quite literally) to dinosaurs, which my dad used to take out into the garden and pose on the rockery for 'realistic' prehistoric photographs. Ah, how the years sailed by!


message 18: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Pearson | 259 comments On a similar topic, the reviews on this are hilarious!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/BIC-For-Her-M...


message 19: by D.D. Chant (new)

D.D. Chant (DDChant) | 7680 comments Never really played with dolls myself... I had a baby sister to practise being 'mummy' on!!! ;-P
Actually, now I come to think of it I didn't really 'do' toys...
If we wanted to play we usually draped a sheet over the table so we had a little tent, stuffed it full of pillows and had a picnic in there. And books, lots and lots of books!


message 20: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments Judging by the replies on this thread, it's no wonder this country is going downhill! Boys need to know how to change spark plugs, or re-wire a plug, or know the 4-4-2 formation inside out, or how to defeat a bear in a knife fight. They don't need cookery sets or prams!! :)


message 21: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments R.M.F wrote: "Patti (Ogre for Hire) wrote: "A friend has posted this on Facebook.


Interesting: Look for toys on amazon.co.uk and you find toys, sorted by age or interest. Look for toys on amazon.de and they ar..."


I'm confident amazon have a team working 24/7 to resolve the problem :)


message 22: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 25061 comments Girls need to re-wire plugs to - I can, but I didn't 'learn through play' and it was nowt to do with what toys I had. (My favourite was a fort)


message 23: by M.T. (new)

M.T. McGuire (mtmcguire) | 7586 comments My favourite toys were Pippa dolls, but they had a space base and they were secret agents. I also had a sword and have not had any qualms about giving my boy a pushchair, all kids like toy pushchairs because they spent a lot of their time in one. He has kitchen set, too, which was one of the best things I ever bought him. He loves cooking with it and brought me a nice plastic saucepan full of 'action figures stew' only last week.

And those bic 'for her' reviews...? Class.

Cheers

MTM


message 24: by Elle (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments Patti (Ogre for Hire) wrote: "Anyone else recalling the conversation we had with Maureen when she was unsure about buying a toy kitchen set for her son? :(

Now I'm pissed off and sad.

I miss her."




The other day I started reading The Night Circus and less than 5% in I was a sobbing mess. I'm not sure I will ever get through that book. I miss her a lot.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments We'll certainly be raising a glass to her at the get-together Peanut.


Simon (Highwayman) (highwayman) | 4698 comments I just asked Amazon a question.... look at my reply....

Thanks for taking the time to send us your comments on "The best place to buy real ale in Biggleswade". I have passed your message along to the team involved with future development of our Communities features. I know they will want to hear your thoughts and suggestions.

If you want to find out more about this or other Amazon.co.uk features, please visit our Amazon.co.uk Site Features Help pages:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/custo...

I hope this helps. We look forward to seeing you again soon.

Did I solve your problem?

If yes, please click here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/rsvp-y?c=txdv...

If no, please click here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/rsvp-n?c=txdv...

To contact us about an unrelated issue, please visit the Help section of our website.

Warmest regards,
----------------
I think something might be goin gon here :)


message 27: by D.D. Chant (new)

D.D. Chant (DDChant) | 7680 comments Victoria wrote: "On a similar topic, the reviews on this are hilarious!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/BIC-For-Her-M..."


I want one!!! Sooooo Prettyyyyyyyy! And they're BIC, I LOVE BIC pens!!! They are the only pens in the world that that write properly!!!


message 28: by Sadie (new)

Sadie Forsythe This kind of thing drives me crazy for two reasons. One, as you mentioned, boys get stimulating, often creative toys while girls get gender reinforcing toys (dolls, kitchens, etc). I think it's always been this way a little bit, but it's getting worse as even those are becoming so much more girly. It's pretty well known that girls will play with boy toys more often than boys with girls toys. Our cultures drive the male stereotype into boys pretty hard and heavy early one. So, the pinking of everything further reinforces that boys can't play with dolls or play house or pretend to cook, etc. This pict has popped up on my FB a number times lately.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...


message 29: by Jud (new)

Jud (judibud) | 18537 comments Patti (Ogre for Hire) wrote: "Anyone else recalling the conversation we had with Maureen when she was unsure about buying a toy kitchen set for her son? :(

Now I'm pissed off and sad.

I miss her."


Me too Patti, I'd forgotten about that. I remember telling her to go for it cause my pals wee boy got one for Christmas and he loved it.


message 30: by Elle (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments While I do like pink nowadays, as a child it was legendary my hatred for it. My Mother says I wouldn't go near ANYTHING pink and it gave her a huge headaches as I loved Polly Pockets and she struggled to find non-pink ones. Also dressing me was horrid as she never found anything 'non-girly'.

I find the same problem now though. It's hard to find female clothes that aren't overly girly but still nice.


message 31: by Jud (new)

Jud (judibud) | 18537 comments My bedroom used to be completely pink when I was little so I got a bit sick of it after a while and used to hate it. Didn't take me long to learn to love it again once I had a much needed make over for my room


Vanessa (aka Dumbo) (vanessaakadumbo) | 8703 comments I had striped wallpaper with flowers on it when I was young. As soon as I could I had it painted light blue and then I put a load of motor bike posters up.
I was more a tomboy than a girly girl. I never was keen on pink, although in past times pink was a boys colour.


message 33: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Hallowell | 55 comments R.M.F wrote: "Judging by the replies on this thread, it's no wonder this country is going downhill! Boys need to know how to change spark plugs, or re-wire a plug, or 4-4-2 formation inside out, or how to defeat a bear in a knife fight. They don't need cookery sets or prams!! :) "

I taught my wife to change diapers, and she'll tell you that, of the two of us, I'm the better cook. I've also worked as an automotive mechanic, and I've rewired more houses than I care to think about. I played football in my youth, and I could tell you some stories about knife fights...and bears.

As a man who is initiated into all of these mysteries, I see no reason to hamstring my son and make him dependent on someone else to feed him and care for his children when he gets older. I see no reason to make my daughter dependent on someone else to fix her car, install her ceiling fans, or defend her against an attack. Specialization is for insects, and I find the idea of "boy toys" and "girl toys" ridiculous.


message 34: by Elle (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments This thread reminds me of those PATHETIC tool kits you get for women. Good grief.


message 35: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21716 comments Elle wrote: "This thread reminds me of those PATHETIC tool kits you get for women. Good grief."

When my daughter bought herself a motorbike, I put together a toolkit for her! All tools I'd have bought for myself so I agree with you entirely.

To follow on from JD my daughters have picked up a wide array of skills, really according to personal preference. They can all cook, two are at a level with mechanics that they are more competent than their boyfriends.

But looking at the whole gender stereotyping debate, girls look to their mothers for role-models, if only because they are the adult female they spend most time with. If the mother spends three times as much as the father on 'personal grooming products' and clothes, what lesson does that pass on to the girl?
From what I can see, mothers can set a good example up until about 12, by which point peer pressure takes over and girls wear what other girls expect them to wear. From that point on there isn't much a mother can do really, other than temper things with wise advice and well placed ridicule.


message 36: by Sara (new)

Sara Boyd (saraboydauthor) | 1412 comments I am surprised that people are surprised about this. It's ALWAYS been like this, not only for toys but for everything else. At least in my experience. Fashion: God forbid your body doesn't conform to the 'standard' shape. Good luck finding clothes if it doesn't.
Children's fashion: When we moved to England I couldn't find clothes for my daughter that weren't a)PINK, which she disliked and b)sparkly/shiny. So little girl's fashion is just what you would choose for a child prostitute, complete with high heels and a sparkly handbag to carry the condoms. Boys: either football or skulls. My boy doesn't like either.
Feet too big? Well, you should have a standard foot, how dare you not??????
I could go on and on for ever, with everything.
What I've been doing since I can remember is get what I need/fits/is comfortable from wherever it's sold, regardless of gender/age or social acceptance. You won't find me dead with a handbag because, to me, nothing screams 'old lady' like a handbag does, no matter the size, colour, make, or what spectacular model has it on the picture.

And I think nothing, NOTHING, makes me cringe more than a pink screwdriver.


message 37: by Sara (new)

Sara Boyd (saraboydauthor) | 1412 comments Also, my wall was cream and green and I always liked photography, so my wall had pictures of landscapes I took. No movie star, no rock band, no Barbie poster, nothing of the sort.


message 38: by Andy (new)

Andy Elliott | 1524 comments A similar thing was spotted in the toy section at Boots, but they did the right thing.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/...


message 39: by Sara (new)

Sara Boyd (saraboydauthor) | 1412 comments Andy wrote: "A similar thing was spotted in the toy section at Boots, but they did the right thing.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/..."


The best toys are the boys section!!!!


message 40: by Elle (last edited Jun 10, 2013 10:49AM) (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments Jim wrote: "Elle wrote: "This thread reminds me of those PATHETIC tool kits you get for women. Good grief."

When my daughter bought herself a motorbike, I put together a toolkit for her! All tools I'd have bo..."


I want to pick up a point on your last comment. My Mother spends a ludicrous amount of money on personal grooming products and clothes, yet can still beat something (bears included - they would run the other direction) to the ground in about two seconds, fix a car and do all the DIY she wanted to.

I really dislike when people assume that when a woman spends money on looking good, she is somehow an absolutely idiot who cannot do anything else. I spend money on looking good and I can do anything a man can do and more (while wearing heels and having my nails done).


When I have a child they will get the impression from me that there is absolutely no need to be shamed into feeling bad about looking after yourself as long as you are a capable, confident and intelligent child. Be anything you want to be even if its mean 'conforming', just be yourself.


message 41: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments Vanessa wrote: "I never was keen on pink, although in past times pink was a boys colour. "

Traditionally it was always pink for boys; blue for girls. Blue is seen a gentle, feminine colour; it's the colour associated with the Virgin Mary. Pink is masculine; it's a "young red", associated with blood and aggression.

Only really since WWII did the gender associations get reversed. Many attribute that to the pink triangle symbol from Nazi concentration camps (now a symbol of gay pride).


message 42: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 1674 comments My Dad used to cook the sunday roast and other meals when my mum was at work. A couple of times his mates asked him why my mum didn't do it. he would say she was either at work or deserved a rest. He wanted some dinner and he wanted mum to have a hot meal to come home to. No cooking meant he had no roast and my mum had to cook when she got home.

He doesn't sew, but to be fair he is partially blind and he can't see to do it and doesn't enjoy stabbing himself in the finger. My Mum was the seamstress.
I had 3 dolls - 1 was a family heirloom I hid in the cupboard, 2 were Cindies I didn't play with. I had fluffy toys, mostly home made, plants, pet worms/spiders/catapillars. I was usually in the garden, sticky or covered in mud. I love "helping" in the garden and watching things grow. Oh and writing and reading.

I can sew, badly. I can cook passably. I could change a plug if I needed too. Cars - no idea I don't have one.

My nephew is a really good cook, likes drama and drawing but my neice is a right little girl.


message 43: by Elle (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments My Father is the seamstress! My Mother can do it but my Father actually is better since his days in RAF he had to learn or go around with holes.


Our house is full of foodies so we never had 'cooking' is a female thing. It was more 'cooking' is a human thing we do because we need to eat.


message 44: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Pearson | 259 comments We have always been pretty easy going about what our kids play with (but then I do most of the "man" jobs around the house anyway), my boys both played with baby dolls (Eldest is really good with babies now, I have always wondered if that was why), my daughter loves her lego (why is lego a "boys" toy??), and my youngest son spent about a month when he was three refusing to wear anything other than a pink tutu, yellow vest and pink tinkerbell wellies. Now that they are older and in school they have fallen into the traditional gender stereotypes a lot more, but they are still pretty clear about what they do and don't want to play with.
I think when it comes to toys the only distinction that should be made in shops is between kids toys and adults toys.


message 45: by Elle (last edited Jun 10, 2013 11:34AM) (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments Victoria, Victoria, Victoria!!!

Noooo.

Definitely not.

Adult toys & just plain toys ;-) (for all the big kids who love to play too)


(I say the no's in jest ;))


message 46: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Pearson | 259 comments lol


message 47: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Pearson | 259 comments good point, because just after saying that I remembered that I bought Hubby a lightsaber for christmas.

From the kids toys section!!! Honestly.


message 48: by Elle (new)

Elle (louiselesley) | 7913 comments I have my eyes set on a new slingshot :D


Rosemary (grooving with the Picts) (nosemanny) | 9058 comments I'd like a lightsabre, a real one.

It'd be handy in the kitchen for slicing and so on.


message 50: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 25061 comments Hey - just noticed that Jim's got a face!


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