The Fall The Fall discussion


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Was he talking to himself?

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Fran Globlek What do you think, was Clamence talking to himself the entire book?
If nothing was true, even us - the person he's talking to - that'd fit his character. Everything a lie, but one that brings us closer to the truth.

In the end of the book, was he about to jump in the water? Saying it's too late now - absurdly - and then jumping, like that woman he chose to ignore back then. Was the entire book a thought, a looking back while going to a bridge and jumping. Or not jumping?
That's what I think - how about you?


Geoffrey I also assumed he was talking to the bartender.


Fevzi Kalem I thought that he was talking to a stranger coming out of the city.


Courtney I love that idea. I did think he was talking to a stranger that he knew had a similar regret.


SARAH i thought he was talking to stranger,some one like him...and i thought the whole book is about conscious..and about lie that we tell to our self to ignore reality.i love that book it was o bright so honest....


Conor Ryan He addressing you; a stranger. You are some random person a bar


SARAH Conor wrote: "He addressing you; a stranger. You are some random person a bar"

well maybe thats true.


Conor Ryan Excuse me" "at a bar" :p


Dave It doesn't matter who he's talking to. It's a confessional - that we choose to take the easy way out of self-awareness. We will always have a convenient reason to not become who we ought to be. .. so the bridge at the end was not him thinking about jumping - he was saying that it's too late to react to the past, to be the type of person that would have saved the woman, the person who isn't continually remorseful about his past. And luckily, he'll never have to face that exact situation again, so he can excuse himself for not living a fully aware life.


message 10: by djt (new) - rated it 3 stars

djt Fran wrote: "What do you think, was Clamence talking to himself the entire book?
If nothing was true, even us - the person he's talking to - that'd fit his character. Everything a lie, but one that brings us c..."


What a great perspective on this book. I hadn't thought about this at all before. However, now that you brought this up, it probably is part of what was intended. Although I think, while Clemance was definitely speaking to the bartender, it was in a more, or less abstract manner; as if after a while, he definitely was just "talking to himself", even though the bartender was there, and also probably not really listening, or grasping, the full meaning of Clemance's words; just as a sounding board, as bartenders often are. I did'nt, though, get the feeling that he was standing on the bridge thinking about jumping. He seemed too impressed with himself to take his own life, but certainly had come to a point of reflection and possibly some remorse.


message 11: by Fran (new) - rated it 5 stars

Fran Globlek You know, first I thought Clamence was talking to just a stranger (to me!), but then there were slight nods that I'm also a lawyer, just like he was (and a few more, but I can't recall now - maybe that I was a Parisian, too?).

So why not? The 'dialogue' has a start, but no real ending - me leaving and him saying goodbye, for instance. Not even hints at a goodbye any time soon. Why would I follow the guy around all the time and then what, just run away?

It's a long shot, but I think the book can be viewed in that light too. Maybe 'mon cher compatriote' is just a curious person, of course.

d. jean wrote: "I did'nt, though, get the feeling that he was standing on the bridge thinking about jumping. He seemed too impressed with himself to take his own life, but certainly had come to a point of reflection and possibly some remorse."

Well, neither did I until the end. I think he was walking around, first really being in the bar, near the end in his apartment, but at the very end I really got that feeling. Saying he jumped is really pushing it (or even that he killed himself in some other way), but it's very easy to view the entire book as final thoughts to oneself. Wish Camus lived to be 100 so I could ask him.


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

I felt he was talking to me, I mean it sounded like he managed to make me feel that I am the partner he was talking to, just to let me play the role and to make me think about his thoughts, in the end I merged completely and become the character, I become even him, Clamence. So yes, he was talking to himself, even when he was talking to others.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi,
This is not relating to the theme of the novel, it's more of a technical question. I have a Robin Buss translation of The Fall and it has certain words that seem to be footnoted, but those footnotes are not to be found anywhere. Is this commonplace in all editions/translations? Many thanks.


Stosch i thought it was a big gorilla, figment of his imagination. maybe hes dying and hallucinating


Paul Martin I always assumed he was really talking to a stranger he met at Mexico City, but I have to admit that I didn't really think about it.

Not a bad interpretation though, with the "it's too late" and the bridge!


Renis Hyka In fact he was talking with everyone of us . He was talking with the reader


Eryc Tri Juni S In my opinion, this book represent Camus himself at the time. Because Jean Paul Satre really kick his ass at the time. I think the correct tittle for this book is the indirect confession of Albert Camus. Ha-ha.


Aksel Strandbygaard Eryc Tri Juni wrote: "In my opinion, this book represent Camus himself at the time. Because Jean Paul Satre really kick his ass at the time. I think the correct tittle for this book is the indirect confession of Albert ..."

Have you ever read Exile and Kingdom? The short story named "Jonas or the Artist at Work" would probably use Camus himself as the narrator


Eryc Tri Juni S To Aksel Strandbygaard :

I'm not yet read it. Probably you were right. Anyway it shows to us that The great philosopher as Camus caliber still using his subjectivity. IMHO, This because telling a naked truth is never been easy. Simple but not easy. Whatever is it, his work really inspiring me.


Aksel Strandbygaard Eryc Tri Juni wrote: "To Aksel Strandbygaard :

I'm not yet read it. Probably you were right. Anyway it shows to us that The great philosopher as Camus caliber still using his subjectivity. IMHO, This because telling a ..."


I agree! The Fall is a great work, it really is! Have you ever read Sartre's "Nausea"? The main character, Antoine Roquentin, doesn't seem to appear as Sartre himself, but if you like the inner monologue and complicated sentences from The Fall you would like Nausea too!


message 21: by stig (new) - rated it 3 stars

stig @Eryc&Askel: If you like 'The Fall' and 'Nausea', you might also like Hamsun's 'Hunger'. (Just throwing it out there in case you haven't read it.)


Eryc Tri Juni S To Aksel Strandbygaard :

Hmmm, sound interesting. I'm gonna check that out. Nice info, thank you.

To j:

Probably I'll try your recommendation too. Thank you.


Aksel Strandbygaard J: I know that book, but haven't read it.. When I've finished Nausea I'm going to read a new book, and Hunger will be in my considerations, but I would also like to read Crime and Punishment or The Karamazov Brothers.. Have you read one of those two?

Eryc: You're welcome! ;) Nausea is a bit more philosophical, it's pretty much a way to explain Sartre's philosophy from Being and Nothingness in fiction.


Eryc Tri Juni S Anyway The Karamazov Brothers remind me about "Stockholm Syndrome". That was something that blowing up my mind, how come the hostage being afraid to be free? Very interesting case. I think Aksel would be interest to deduct that case with his philosophical point of view. Happy reading dude !


message 25: by stig (new) - rated it 3 stars

stig Aksel: Haven't gotten into Dostoevsky. Tried a novella ('The Gambler'), found his style tiresome (which might have been the translator's fault).


Aksel Strandbygaard Thanks Eryc! I Haven't read Stockholm Syndrome - Is that a good book?

J: Probably the translator's fault as you said!
You should try one of the books I mentioned instead ;)


Eryc Tri Juni S No, that isn't a book title bro, but it's a psychological case that occur at The Karamazov brothers story. Just read that book bro, you will understand exactly what I mean.


Aksel Strandbygaard Haha, I'll do it when I'm done with Nausea


Özlem Güzelharcan Eryc Tri Juni wrote: "No, that isn't a book title bro, but it's a psychological case that occur at The Karamazov brothers story. Just read that book bro, you will understand exactly what I mean. "

There is book titled "Stockholm Syndrome" though :p

Aksel wrote: "Thanks Eryc! I Haven't read Stockholm Syndrome - Is that a good book?

J: Probably the translator's fault as you said!
You should try one of the books I mentioned instead ;)"



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