SciFi and Fantasy eBook Club discussion

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Member Chat > The Great Free Book Debate

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message 1: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments I often see people arguing over the merits (or otherwise) of authors offering books for free for promotion purposes. Some people use it as a good marketing tool and some people see it as akin to satan's work. I also see readers snapping up free books left, right and centre and some who avoid them and would never read a free book.

I have decided to host a debate, both camps can put forward their views, including readers. Questions will be asked and opinions can be vented but it will not get nasty.

If you think you might like to be involved, either as an author or a reader please email me at libraryoferana@yahoo.co.uk stating:

Author - for freebies.
Author - against freebies.
Reader - for freebies.
Reader - against freebies.

If I get enough responses it could be a regular thing.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

See I'm a reader that's a little for and against. I've picked up some good freebies and discovered some decent authors by reading one freebie and then moving on to others. Mainak Dhar and Daniel Arenson are both examples of that.

But, if I'm looking specifically at free books, I have to wade through a sea of dreck to find these good authors. There is so much that just looks like yet another stock book in a particular genre or, when sampled, is in need of a good editing and sometimes even just a good spell check and grammar check.

So, I like browsing through the freebies for the goodies I've found, and I hate it because there's so much to weed through to find those goodies.


message 3: by Chris (new)

Chris Nielsen | 48 comments I personally think price is a terrible way to choose a book. If a book has good reviews I will happily pay for it


message 4: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments That could be said of all books free or not. There is plenty of dreck which people charge for. I tend to only download books which I would actually think about reading.

Just because a book has a price doesn't mean it is any good.


message 5: by Jo (new)

Jo Sparkes (josparkes) | 3 comments I'm an author who's made my money writing for many years -- but have only just ventured into the self-published area this month.

VERY interested in all of your views here. Having been told that the freebie offering is a great way to market a book, I wonder if it does bring in folks who otherwise might not risk the 99 cents?

I know the key is getting the word out, but how best to do that is a mystery to me :)

(Book is The Birr Elixir -- http://birrelixir.com/)


message 6: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments That is the ultimate question;)


message 7: by LastWordIn (new)

LastWordIn (qazak) | 1 comments This is a great topic, and as a reader I am very interested in seeing the authors' point of view on this.

As far as I am concerned as a reader, if a book is free or $100; if it is too long or too short; or if it is having a great cover or a simple one, none of this affects my decision to read it. What I do care for is if the book blurb/description has been able to capture my interest or not. If I can not care for the story from the description the author has provided me, there's no reason for me to buy it or even get it as a freebie.

These are just my two cents. Looking forward to see what everyone says.
-qaz


message 8: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments My plan is to run the debate via google docs as there are people from different forums and threads involved. When people who want to be involved email me I will add them to the list and send out instructions (when I have some). The actual debate will be run on the Mythic Scribes Blog which has a really big readership but as some of you aren't MS members that is why I decided on Google docs. We can then collaborate and the final debate gets posted when it is edited. I suspect there will be repetitions and the usual meandering which goes on. I will of course link back to where it can be found when it gets posted.

There is no reason why there can't be discussions here also but anyone who wants to participate on the official one please email me.


message 9: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 99 comments I'm a reader and definitely in the 'like free downloads' camp.

Pre-Kindle, my exposure to new-to-me authors were limited to what I found at the library or in second hand bookshops. Reading is almost my only entertainment, don't watch TV or go to movies. However, I am a fast reader plus have limited bookshelf space, so my full-price book purchases have been limited. I only buy books/series that I know I am going to enjoy enough to want to keep and re-read. Pre-Kindle, I had just six authors (nine series_ that were auto-buy for me. After my Kindle, in just 18 months, I have added six more authors to my 'auto-buy' list. I'm definitely finding more authors I like via the Kindle free downloads and these are, as far as I know, authors I would not have found otherwise.


message 10: by Massimo (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments Sharon wrote: "I'm a reader and definitely in the 'like free downloads' camp.

Pre-Kindle, my exposure to new-to-me authors were limited to what I found at the library or in second hand bookshops. Reading is almo..."


Would you be more selective, thus more probable to find a good new author with only $0.99 books?


message 11: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 99 comments Massimo wrote: "Would you be more selective, thus more probable to find a good new author with only $0.99 books?"

I don't think so. I screen the free downloads as it is, select just from the genres I like to read plus try to avoid some of my 'pet peeves' when I can identify them in the description. I probably average about 60 free downloads a month and I definitely would not buy that many "unknowns" a month even at $.99 a book.


message 12: by Massimo (last edited Jun 10, 2013 12:13PM) (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments Well, from your reply it seems you would be more selective if you're not going to buy those many 'unknown' writers a month.

What would you consider additionally on a $0.99 book that you care not with a freeby? The cover? The blurb? The reviews?


message 13: by Sharon (last edited Jun 10, 2013 12:33PM) (new)

Sharon Michael | 99 comments Massimo wrote: "Well, from your reply it seems you would be more selective if you're not going to buy those many 'unknown' writers a month.

What would you consider additionally on a $0.99 book that you care not with a freeby? The cover? The blurb? The reviews? ..."


I would probably rely more (again) on books from the library or from library downloads. I would probably limit my buying to something like 10 books a month rather than 60m I think that was about my budget for unknowns in my pre-Kindle years with paperbacks from the used bookstores.

I don't look at the covers at all. With freebies as well as library books and used bookstore books, I read the blurb and discard a lot of them from that. That's mainly what I use for my try/don't try decision on any book.

For the few new to me authors I do buy to try, I will go to the reviews and skim through those first although I typically pay more attention to the 2,3 and 4 star ratings than 1 and 5 star. Usually the 1 star tends to 'hated it' with not much substance and a lot of the 5 stars are the same thing at the other end of the spectrum. I find the 'middle' ground a better balance of what the reader liked and didn't like, gives me a better idea of whether I'd like the book or not.


message 14: by Massimo (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments Sharon wrote: "Massimo wrote: "Well, from your reply it seems you would be more selective if you're not going to buy those many 'unknown' writers a month.

What would you consider additionally on a $0.99 book tha..."


Thanks, Sharon, for sharing.


message 15: by Fayley (new)

Fayley If not for the Baen Free Library I would never have discovered Lois McMaster Bujold - so I'm all for free books to "sample" authors new to me.


message 16: by E.D. (new)

E.D. Lynnellen (EDLynnellen) | 64 comments I'm also new to self-publishing, and also undecided on whether a "free" promotion is viable in building readership. Any longtime Kindle authors have any personal stories to share?


message 17: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments I think it really is one of those situations where what works for one doesn't work for another. It tends to be better with more than one book but that said a lot of people do find it useful with one.

My experience - the first one - not that much. Second one, much better, got a few reviews, had sales in Canada, and Germany after BUT that said it coincided with my book being nominated as book of the month.

It is a good way to get your name out there, but how many people read the book...that is another matter.


message 18: by Massimo (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments I agree, Alexandra. A totally different matter how many people actually read a free download.

To me, free is $0.99 ;) Then a reader will read it, or not download at all.


message 19: by Randy (new)

Randy Harmelink | 714 comments I'm a free book junkie.


The only books I have paid for in the last year were later books in series where I had gotten one or more books for free (or used Kindle Lending to read).

As it is, I have so many free books, there's no reason to pay for a book unless it's from a known author.

But I do leave reviews on most of the stuff I read. What determines what I read right away is the book description. What keeps me away is having to search for an actual description of the book, by having to wade through reviews and other promotional junk. I just ignore them, and usually ignore the book as well.


message 20: by Massimo (last edited Jun 16, 2013 01:24AM) (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments Randy wrote: "I'm a free book junkie.


The only books I have paid for in the last year were later books in series where I had gotten one or more books for free (or used Kindle Lending to read)..."


Randy, I think your comment describes why FREE is, in part, bad.


message 21: by Randy (new)

Randy Harmelink | 714 comments I don't disagree.


It's good for the authors that can catch my attention enough to make me want to read their stuff immediately.

But for the others, the books will just sit there unless some outside influence reignites my interest.


message 22: by Massimo (last edited Jun 16, 2013 02:11AM) (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments Randy wrote: "I don't disagree.


It's good for the authors that can catch my attention enough to make me want to read their stuff immediately.

But for the others, the books will just sit there unless some outs..."


Not only this, Randy. Many, too many so called writers also use FREE as the excuse for poorly written material and FREE has played a role in the junk Amazon is currently listing. After all, it's free... "What? you also ask for it to be well written?"

Free promotions, I'm not against it but the file should have a life-span. You get a book for free, it is in your kindle only for a week before self-deleting. THEN, free would serve the purpose of allowing writers who are plugging their way to get noticed and use free as a way to be discovered.

I'll never put my work permanently FREE, I don't want it to languish forgotten in a kindle and be deleted to make room for other FREE material. To me, $0.99 is the new FREE.


message 23: by Randy (new)

Randy Harmelink | 714 comments Massimo wrote: "Free promotions, I'm not against it but the file should have a life-span. You get a book for free, it is in your kindle only for a week before self-deleting. THEN, free would serve the purpose of allowing writers who are plugging their way to get noticed and use free as a way to be discovered."

You just described Amazon's Prime lending program. But it is only one book per month.

However, the authors DO get compensated for their lent out books. For the last few months, it was over $2 per book.

And, BTW, if the free book I do read has a lot of typos and grammatical errors, it will be noted in my review. I had one short story that averaged 3 or 4 errors per Kindle page. I also note if I think the regular price is too high, although that won't affect my rating.

There are a lot of short Kindle books out there that are less than 10 pages. Definitely not worth $0.99.

I complained to one author that described a "book" as part of a trilogy, even though it was only 17 pages long. Geez. Just write all three parts and publish it. It'll STILL be a short story, maybe a novella.

BTW, I only download to my Kindle what I expect to read soon. Everything else stays in the Amazon Cloud. Right now, I only have 7 pages of books on my Kindle, even though I have over 4000 books in the Cloud. And I have 238 books on my GoodReads "Must Read" shelf as my second tier of priority.


message 24: by Steph (last edited Jun 16, 2013 04:01AM) (new)

Steph Bennion (stephbennion) | 84 comments I have mixed feelings about this, but do offer sci-fi short stories for free, including direct from my own website. I'm not convinced they work well as a promotional tool. The vast majority of my freebies have been downloaded via Sony and B&N, but I've yet to sell any novels through those retailers. On the other hand, the anthology I have on KDP Select has generated the odd sale following a free promotion.

EDIT: I had a review (on B&N) that actually said, "Thank you for the free entertainiment." It was my pleasure!


message 25: by Massimo (new)

Massimo Marino | 34 comments Randy wrote: "Massimo wrote: "Free promotions, I'm not against it but the file should have a life-span. You get a book for free, it is in your kindle only for a week before self-deleting. THEN, free would serve ..."

But to be in the lending program you have to be on KDP Select, ie, you cannot sell your book with other programs or be in other retailers like Apple, Nook, B&N, etc. Amazon binds you in an exclusivity agreement.

No thanks :)


message 26: by E.D. (new)

E.D. Lynnellen (EDLynnellen) | 64 comments This is a great discussion. It appears to be one of those "they know that I know that you know that they know that you know that I know they know" circles. Seems to be a painting a wall with jello conundrum. I'm going to pray to George Carlin, and hope for intercession. :}


message 27: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments Downloading a book simply because it is free and you are never going to read it seems a bit pointless. I admit I download free books, but I don't download books I wouldn't be interested in anyway. I will also happily buy books.


message 28: by Charles (new)

Charles (nogdog) AUTHORS: Please keep self-promotion out of this thread, or it will be moved to the "Authors" forum. While it is nice to have a conversation between authors and readers on a subject of mutual interest, it is not nice to take advantage of the situation to sell your wares.

Moderatingly yours...


message 29: by Randy (new)

Randy Harmelink | 714 comments Alexandra wrote: "Downloading a book simply because it is free and you are never going to read it seems a bit pointless."

Geez. You'd be downloading 500-800 books per day if you did that.


message 30: by Charles (new)

Charles (nogdog) I don't think I ever downloaded a free e-book that I knew I would never read, but I've certainly downloaded quite a few (not hundreds, though!) that I thought I just possibly might want to read, do I downloaded then and there to get it while it was still free -- knowing full well the likelihood was not too high. In many cases, it ended up just being a full-length free sample that convinced me I would not, in fact, read it. :-)


message 31: by E.D. (new)

E.D. Lynnellen (EDLynnellen) | 64 comments I communed with Carlin and he asked me if I have a drawer filled with those tiny packets of "horsey" sauce. Anyone here interpret delusions?


message 32: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments Yes, sorry will try and keep the promo to a minimum.


message 33: by Steph (new)

Steph Bennion (stephbennion) | 84 comments Alexandra wrote: "Yes, sorry will try and keep the promo to a minimum."

Ditto (and apologies). It struck me that I have read a fair few freebies that were book one of a series, but I can't think of any that grabbed me enough to buy book two. The indie authors I now look out for, awaiting their next book, are all ones I've spent money on. I'm wondering if the act of making a payment means I automatically value those author's works more.


message 34: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 99 comments Steph wrote: "It struck me that I have read a fair few freebies that were book one of a series, but I can't think of any that grabbed me enough to buy book two. "

I've found several that I've bought the second book in the series and now have five authors that are on my 'auto-buy' list, which is actually quite limited.

Pre-Kindle, I had six current authors on my 'auto-buy' list from years of reading. These were books I felt certain before ever reading that they would be books I would want to keep to re-read, series or authors I was familiar with and who had a track record with my reading preferences. These were culled exclusively from library books, which was my primary source of new-to-be authors. I simply do not buy books by authors I'm not familiar with and never have.

Post Kindle, not yet a full two years now, I have added five new-to-me authors to that list of 'auto-buys', all of which originally from 'free download' lists. In most cases the first book was free, sometimes the second book as well, though more usually $.99 or $1.99 and I think with all five authors, there was at least one more and usually two or more books available in that series or stand-alones by that author.


message 35: by Judy (new)

Judy Goodwin | 42 comments There are some who will take advantage of free downloads and never pay for a book--but back when music started to go digital, there were also those who never paid for downloaded music either. I think free promotions are still valuable because it gets your name and your book out there. I can't tell you how many albums I bought based on a FREE song someone sent me. I've also done about 10-20 free Kindle downloads, and some of those books I've enjoyed and bought the next one.

Some people wouldn't pay for a book, at whatever price, so I don't see a free download as losing a sale, but gaining a possible reader. I just hope they spread the word if they enjoy it!


message 36: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 99 comments Judy wrote: "I don't see a free download as losing a sale, but gaining a possible reader. I just hope they spread the word if they enjoy it! "

If I read one of the free downloads from beginning to end, I do feel I'm obligated to leave a review of the book. I look at the review as my thank you for the free book.


message 37: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 37 comments Sharon wrote: "Judy wrote: "I don't see a free download as losing a sale, but gaining a possible reader. I just hope they spread the word if they enjoy it! "

If I read one of the free downloads from beginning to..."


Sharon, I think that is great. A lot of people don't leave reviews especially for free books. Even if you don't like the book a review is useful.

Of the free books I have read it is certainly the case some were substandard but that can also be said about the books I have paid for.


message 38: by Nathan (new)

Nathan Preedy | 3 comments There is no better publicity than word of mouth and promoting your book for free for a few days will aid that. I use the KDP Select program and, around a couple of weeks or so after a free day ends, I notice a sudden surge in purchases before it dies back down again.

As I am doing no advertising of the book (other than a banner ad here on Goodreads) I assume that this sudden uptick is due to people who downloaded the book for free finishing their reading of it and recommending it to their friends.

As somebody said further down this thread, each free download could result in more sales. It only takes one person to like a book and recommend it to their friends for word of mouth to start generating a sales buzz.


message 39: by Al "Tank" (last edited Jun 18, 2013 12:10PM) (new)

Al "Tank" (alkalar) | 231 comments Sharon wrote: "If I read one of the free downloads from beginning to end, I do feel I'm obligated to leave a review of the book. I look at the review as my thank you for the free book. If I read one of the free downloads from beginning to end, I do feel I'm obligated to leave a review of the book. I look at the review as my thank you for the free book. "

Sharon, if you want to read just about anything for free, all you have to do is promise to review it. You'll be inundated. I work for AKW Books, and like most publishers both legitimate and self-published authors, we're hungry for reviews. For instance, you could ask for any book from our catalog in return for a review.

Just about any publisher of books that aren't currently swimming in reviews will happily do that, especially eBooks.

Free offers from publishers (at least on Amazon) are there for several reasons. Reviews are one of them. "Chumming the waters" for a series is another (yes, we're guilty of that), and to improve a book's position in later paid lists (although Amazon seems to have watered down that method quite a bit). We publish such events in the appropriate places on GoodReads (one coming up this weekend).

For the reader (yes, I'm one in my "free time" -- whatever that is), free stuff is nice if only for the opportunity to read something different. But of course, the price is nice too. I usually preview the first chapter online (same as I would for something I was thinking of buying) to see if it grabs me. After all, my time is worth something to me, same as most people, and I don't want to waste it on a lousy book (there are a LOT of those today, as others have pointed out). Since I do this in my job, I can weed out a bad book in the first few paragraphs -- most of the time.

So, free or paid, make use of the preview options on Amazon and other retailers. You'll save both time and money on a "bad read" in many cases (not all, but it improves your odds).


message 40: by E.D. (new)

E.D. Lynnellen (EDLynnellen) | 64 comments As I keep coming back to this discussion, I see great points being made that convince me the "wind blows both ways" in the Land of Free Books. Good and bad, viable and non. Great to see it bantered by both readers and those who want to be read. Thanks Alexandra.


message 41: by Randy (new)

Randy Harmelink | 714 comments Nathan wrote: "There is no better publicity than word of mouth and promoting your book for free for a few days will aid that."

Which is why I found the recent associate decision by Amazon to be puzzling. It basically shut down several of the sites that listed free book offers on Amazon. For you, that was free advertising that your book was available for free. So your free offerings should be less effective than they used to be.

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 42: by Lazlo (new)

Lazlo Ferran (lazloferran) | 9 comments If this is the wrong place to mention this I apologize.

Too Bright the Sun is 'Blade Runner meets Paths of Glory!' I am currently doing the Amazon KDP FREE Promotion for the book so you can get it FREE until the 28th June http://bit.ly/12dmjUv
Please, please feel free to download and give me your feedback. Reviews most welcome!


message 43: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Weaver (goodreadscomandrew_weaver) | 8 comments I have done a few promotions, and my book is currently free just now.
I have given away 1000+ books, and in return have received only a handful of reviews so its very much a hit & miss thing.
I am still in the 'time will tell' camp...


message 44: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 99 comments Andrew wrote: "I have given away 1000+ books, and in return have received only a handful of reviews so its very much a hit & miss thing."

Out of curiosity, I checked my Amazon reviews and I have 270 reviews up of books I've read since I got my Kindle about 18 months ago. The big majority of those books were free downloads, probably 80% to 90% of those.

I have no idea how many free books I've actually downloaded to read/review those 270 books, but I do try to review every one I read from beginning to end, though I'm sure I've missed a few.

I don't have any idea how many free books total I've downloaded. I do screen them and only download those in the genres I prefer and books I think I will enjoy based on the blurb. I don't have a lot of patience for books that don't catch my interest, however, so there are many free books that don't get read past the first few chapters and thus not reviewed.

I used the same 'method' when the introduction to all of my new-to-me authors were via library books. Even there, with books that definitely went through the traditional editing/publishing process to be issued in hardback, I probably didn't finish more than half or 2/3 of the books I checked out. I do know the percentage of books I finish from the free downloads is even lower than the library books because of the proliferation of indie-published books but not sure by how much.


message 45: by Ben (new)

Ben Rowe (benwickens) Cory Doctorow rightly states that the biggest problem an author faces is obscurity rather than people reading their work for free.

There are so many books available for free, new and old that merely offering your work for free is no longer a method that will guarantee getting buzz, fans and reviews. I think there is a huge difference between short and novel length works. With short SF and fantasy there are loads of superb online stories for free legally. These include Tor.com, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Lightspeed and Clarkesworld. These magazines produce fiction that is at least as good and interesting as can otherwise be accessed by paying for them. Indeed Lightspeed and Clarkesworld depend to a point on subscriptions and doing so enables you to choose between reading online (minor inconvenience) and paying a small amount to have easier access to the stories. That means people who are short of cash are not deprived the fiction and they can help promote it to those who dont. However I can see it would be exceedingly hard to try to publish anything new (like a collection of stories) in this market at the moment as there is so much highly regarded stuff that is available for free there are huge barriers to be noticed. Really I would think you would either need to have superb marketing, superb connections, or you would be better getting stories sold to magazines first.

There are types of people who will NEVER buy something if they can get it for free. They will only read free ebooks for instance. With this sort of person you are not going to get purchases from them but you might perhaps get good reviews. As has been mentioned there are loads of books that you can get for free in exchange for a decent review and that is perhaps something that is more clearly reciprocal than just offering free downloads (without any other purchasing options) for the books.

I think there is a huge difference between a well known writer like Cory Doctorow or some of the writers in what was Baen Free Library offering their works for free and some unknown author. Within self publishing there are many, many books that are just terrible. Even if the book has the potential to be good they have not benefited from the professional editing and copy editing that is the difference between a professional book and a non-professional book. I am not a professional editor but within reading 2 paragraphs I can pretty much tell if this is something that is badly written with poor editing and bereft of original ideas (90+ percent of what is out there) or something that might be worth persisting with.

For a new writer offering your work for free is perhaps an easy way of getting people to read it and get some reviews but I think that there are far more meaningful ways of developing relationships with readers. If you can engage with people and connect with people you are more likely to get the benefit of reviews, the reviews you get will be more substantial and you may also benefit from honest feedback that hones your writing craft.


message 46: by A.C. (last edited Sep 16, 2013 01:58PM) (new)

A.C. Kavich (ackavich) A.L. wrote: "I often see people arguing over the merits (or otherwise) of authors offering books for free for promotion purposes. Some people use it as a good marketing tool and some people see it as akin to sa..."

This debate is intriguing! The world of e-publishing is evolving so quickly, it's hard to keep abreast of the latest developments. Its great to have a place like this where individual experience can become collective wisdom.


message 47: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 233 comments I'm an author who thinks free books are...only sometimes...worth doing. Granted, I've only got one Kindle Direct book out there now, and have only generated 17 sales in the first month it's been available...

However, from what I've read on blog posts elsewhere, written by people who have been doing eBooks for years and who have had some success at it, free eBooks only make sense in some cases:

1) If the work is part of a larger series, it does make sense to make the first one free so that people who download it and like it will be more inclined to purchase the rest of the series.
2) You have multiple books in your catalog and you want to do a short promotional offering.

Otherwise, it doesn't make much sense. First of all (talking strictly Kindle here), free books don't help your book's ranking unless you're generating 20,000+ downloads. They changed the algorithm so that you don't really get a bump for free book sales. Which means that even if you give away several thousand copies, your book's still going to be hard to find on amazon.

Secondly, there are a LOT of people who download nothing but free books, books they never intend to read, in all genres (even ones they do not like) simply because it is free. I would expect the free book junkies here not to be among that group, because I seriously doubt those kinds of people are passionate enough about books to be Goodread members. BUT, these people will never buy your other books. They don't help your rankings, and . . .

Thirdly, there are people out there who will give 1-star reviews simply because they don't like the genre of your book. "I picked up this book because it was free, but it turns out to be a stupid SF book. I hate SF. Waste of time." 1-star. Do we really want those people trolling our ratings?

My pricing philosophy is this: Any well written novel is worth at least the cost of a Starbucks drink. I see people shell out over $4/day on those coffee flavored cream and sugar drinks. They chug them down in 15 minutes. So surely a 60,000 word novel is worth $4. Novellas, $2 to $3. Anything shorter, $1.

But when I get more done on a series? I'm likely to make one of the early works free or cheap just to give people a full dose of what I write. If they like it, then I'm sure they'll have no problem with paying for the rest.


message 48: by Jim (new)

Jim | 418 comments I think your pricing policy is nicely done :-)


message 49: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 233 comments Jim wrote: "I think your pricing policy is nicely done :-)"

Thanks, Jim. When I get to be a bestseller, I'll jack up the price to a more self-important premium. ];)


message 50: by Ken (new)

Ken (kanthr) | 165 comments For me, a great story is worth whatever the sticker says. $1, $100, $1000. If it's the best possible copy of this story, and the story is amazing, I will pay anything for it. To that end, as a reader, I'm not affected much by freebie offers. I'd read a free book or buy an expensive book.

From an author's perspective, I think it can be a great way to promote.


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