UK Amazon Kindle Forum discussion

64 views
Author Zone - Readers Welcome! > How do you choose your title?

Comments Showing 1-50 of 55 (55 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments More specifically, do you check to see how many books out there already have the same title?

I just did a search for a book and had to wade through a few pages of titles before I found the one I wanted.


message 2: by Anne (new)

Anne Ullah | 75 comments Originally I was going to call my book Rigid Bones's Diary because the heroine lives on Twitter and her name on there is @RigidBones. Also, she was created as a character on a comedy website and her column was called Rigid Bones's Diary. However, just before I self published, I had a change of heart and decided to call the book Trouble At Toff Towers which is what it is about, even though it is written in diary format. Some people have commented I should have stuck to the original title. Too late now! I'm working on the sequel and I was using Trouble At Toff Towers II - Another Heap as a working title but have decided to stick to it. Putting the original book on free promo tomorrow...fingers crossedI get some downloads!

AU x


message 3: by Shaun (new)

Shaun (shaunjeffrey) | 2467 comments 'Sir' works best for me. Sometimes I like 'Sire' though. It all depends what game I'm playing.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Shaun wrote: "'Sir' works best for me. Sometimes I like 'Sire' though. It all depends what game I'm playing."

Not Lord?


message 5: by Shaun (new)

Shaun (shaunjeffrey) | 2467 comments Not tried that one out. I'll have to see how it sounds when said aloud.


message 6: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 25061 comments just don't follow it with 'Luvaduck'!


message 7: by Shaun (new)

Shaun (shaunjeffrey) | 2467 comments Lol. But it does roll off the tongue, Ignite ;)


message 8: by David (last edited Jun 07, 2013 05:32AM) (new)

David Staniforth (davidstaniforth) | 7939 comments Fuel to the Fire was going to be "Seperated Elements" right up until 3 weeks before publishing. The title I went for is a major theme in the book and I felt it just sounded better and had a cetain ambiguity (also relevant to the story). When I searched there was only non fiction with similar titles.

Alloria was always going to be titled as such. I didn't bother searching as I had thought that I'd invented the name. Fortuately there isn't much containing the name anyway.


message 9: by Karen (new)

Karen Lowe | 2333 comments Interesting question.
I did Google my titles before they became fixed, but I've always had the problem with Death in the Physic Garden that people misread it as 'psychic' garden - no amount of googling was going to spot that!


message 10: by Geoff (new)

Geoff Woodland | 140 comments For my novel Ice King, I used the main character’s name and the product that got him out of a jam (ice does not refer to drugs, but frozen water). I wanted the title to be short and easy to remember. I should have Googled the title, but at the time I was so green it didn’t occur to me. It is now being republished by a UK publisher and they have changed the title to Triangle Trade, which does feature in the book, but as the back drop to the story, not the main theme. This time I did Google the various names that were put forward for the new publication, and in the end agreed on Triangle Trade. Creating the new name is a story in itself. :-o)


message 11: by Darren (new)

Darren Humphries (darrenhf) | 6980 comments Titles are the hardest thing to come up with for me. Sometimes they just pop into my head straight out of the story (An Orc Not Like Others) but others took forever (The Great Rock N Roll Doomsday Tour). I'm still not happy with Penny Kilkenny Saves The Day as a title, but I knew that it had to have her name in it.

I always check for other books with the same title, but mine tend to be so off the wall that there isn't a lot of competition.


message 12: by Michael Cargill (new)

Michael Cargill Cargill (michaelcargill) | 2994 comments I just try to think of something that vaguely fits the story without having to be explained.

I don't ever bother searching for books with the same title. I think you're on a hiding to nothing going down that route, there's only so many different titles you can use.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments I agree it has to fit the book, Michael. But don't you think using the title to make it stand from other books is also important?


message 14: by Michael Cargill (last edited Jun 08, 2013 04:44AM) (new)

Michael Cargill Cargill (michaelcargill) | 2994 comments To a degree, yes, but you're far more restricted with what you can do with the title.

I think the cover offers more freedom to make a book stand out.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments True, if you're talking about a book on a shelf amongst others. But what about if you're discussing or recommending the book?


message 16: by Michael Cargill (new)

Michael Cargill Cargill (michaelcargill) | 2994 comments I personally can't imagine being swayed by the title of a book in that type of scenario.

Obviously there's degrees involved - I probably wouldn't think highly of book about Stalin's purges that was titled 'Poo' - but I think it's a very minor consideration overall.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments That would be a memorable title though! Lol!


Gingerlily - The Full Wild | 36808 comments That would signify a different type of purge...


message 19: by David (new)

David Staniforth (davidstaniforth) | 7939 comments No, I didn't consider that as a title for one of my books. Just getting in first!


message 20: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments I like the idea of one word titles - it makes them snappy, plus they're very popular in YA literature. But at the same time, all the good words have already been used a million times. Added to that I wanted a series of similar-sounding titles (Wanted / Hunted / Cheated / Splatted / Farted / Jilted / Executed...) Okay, maybe not Jilted ;)

For a time I tried adding a prefix, so it was Kingsmen:Wanted. Which was dead easy to find, since the searches came up with it right away, but everywhere shortened the listing to just Kingsmen, and when you've got a series starting all with the same word, that's a bit useless.

So then I went with a suffix. Flick Carter Book 1, book 2 etc. So a search on "Wanted Flick" will get it every time. And that has the added (dis)advantage that in a poor light and with the "wrong" font, the LI sometimes looks like a u...


message 21: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hill | 1603 comments I wrote about Maureen going to Venice so I called the book 'Maureen goes to Venice' ;)


message 22: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21702 comments In 'Dead Man Riding East' the phrase occurred in the book and I decided I thought it would make an interesting title.
'Swords for a Dead Lady' occurred to me after four pints and still seemed good next day.
'The Flames of the City' highlights an incident within the story.

The problem is, I don't know if they're good titles, they're merely titles that I liked and used :-(


message 23: by D.D. Chant (new)

D.D. Chant (DDChant) | 7680 comments I came up with Broken City (BEFORE the film!!!) about half way through the book. It was on a short list with 'The Other Brother' and 'The Lost Boy'.
The Promise is quite a common name but I have a good reason for going with it anyway. The next book in the series is called The Vow. ;-P
I knew I wanted to call my 3rd book Fracture almost from the start. As Tim said I like one word titles, all three books in the series will have one word titles.
The next book in the Broken City series is called Broken Truce, keeping the theme of the first book. It took me a little while to decide on though.


message 24: by Andy (new)

Andy Elliott | 1524 comments The Remarkables, both the name of my book and the titular group of heroes featured within, was named after the spectacular range of mounrains in New Zealand. It was originally called Reaching Out, until another author suggested that it wasn't a particularly enticing title. Didn't stop me from using it for its follow up though.


message 25: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments Andy wrote: "The Remarkables, both the name of my book and the titular group of heroes featured within, was named after the spectacular range of mounrains in New Zealand. It was originally called Reaching Out, ..."

So is it set in New Zealand? That's got me intrigued...


message 26: by Andy (new)

Andy Elliott | 1524 comments Tim wrote: "So is it set in New Zealand? That's got me intrigued......"

I'm afraid it's set in boring old blighty, and takes in such glamorous hotspots such as Oxford Circus station, Tintagel and Tring. The follow up is far more globe trotting, and does indeed include a trip to Aotearoa, so watch this space...


message 27: by Sara (new)

Sara Boyd (saraboydauthor) | 1412 comments 'NEM' was a mistake because I didn't check, or better said, when I checked or how I checked, there was no book with the same name, but when I published it, it turns out there's like four or five with the same name. So I researched it a bit better for the short story. Second novel I haven't got a clue, but will try and research so that not many other books have the same name.


message 28: by Darren (new)

Darren Humphries (darrenhf) | 6980 comments Andy wrote: "Tim wrote: "So is it set in New Zealand? That's got me intrigued......"

I'm afraid it's set in boring old blighty, and takes in such glamorous hotspots such as Oxford Circus station, Tintagel and ..."


Tring, I know it well. Well enough to avoid anyhow. Lol

Are you local to there?


message 29: by Andy (new)

Andy Elliott | 1524 comments Darren wrote: "Tring, I know it well. Well enough to avoid anyhow. Lol

Are you local to there? ."


No, it just happened to have certain geographical features that I needed for the plot to work (a canal, a train station, and a church). I could have used any number of different locations, to be honest, but I just kinda like the name Tring, it sounds almost onomatopoeic.


message 30: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Fish | 103 comments I generally like to start with a play on words and wait until my publisher insists it changes to something more mundane. So Erasmus Hobart and the Golden Arrow began life as Robin Who? as in who's this Robin Hood fellow?/who is he robbing? and - because it's about time travel - a nod to Doctor Who. I hope to make enough of a success to get as far as the fifth book, because I love the working title "Tea and Synchrony" - can you guess when that one's set?


message 31: by Kevin (new)

Kevin McLeod (vikingsapprentice) | 50 comments My book, The Viking's Apprentice, began life as Campbell's Cove. The original title that I stuck with almost right through the writing process told the reader the sum total of zero about what was in store for them.
The new title came from reading my own book through twice and a sentence containing the words The Viking's Apprentice jumped out at me and so I changed the name. If you have read the book you will agree it makes perfect sense now!


message 32: by Karen (new)

Karen Lowe | 2333 comments Haven't read it yet, Kevin, but you're right - I love that title!


message 33: by Robert (new)

Robert Spake (ManofYesterday) | 328 comments I'm pretty good with titles and it's one of my favourite parts of the writing process.

Angelic Hellfire came to me when I was watching some music videos and it just clicked.

Fraudulent was originally called something else for a long time, but then for some reason I thought of the world 'Fraudulent' and it fit the themes of the novel so I went with that, and actually used the other title for a book in the story.

I, Tomorrow? and Other Stories was originally Flight and Other Stories, but I saw there was another book with that exact title so I just used the title of one of the other stories in the collection. Sometimes I go for something poetic "Looking Beyond the Edge of the Universe", sometimes I go for a bit of a pun "The Hollow World."


message 34: by D.D. Chant (last edited Jul 10, 2013 04:02AM) (new)

D.D. Chant (DDChant) | 7680 comments Normally I'll have several titles, I short list them and pick the one I like best. 'Broken City' was on a short list with 'The Other Brother' and 'Lost Boy', and yes it was BEFORE the film!!! ;-P The next book in the series was only awkward to name because I couldn't decide whether to include the title of the series (Broken City) for clarities sake. But I always knew that the title would contain the word 'truce'. In the end I settled with 'Broken Truce'.

My second book was the easiest to name, (The Promise) it couldn't really have been anything else because it's part of a series with a continuing theme of promises. The next book is called The Vow.

My third is called Fracture, I had the title almost from the first page!!!


message 35: by Will (new)

Will Moore | 9 comments I just wait until something jumps off the page and grabs me. The trouble is, I don't like changing titles once I've decided. It's the same with character names - once I think of someone as 'Fred', changing it to 'Charlie' seems wrong.

--
Will


message 36: by Adam (new)

Adam (adammannan) | 133 comments It's good to hear other authors' thoughts on naming books and the processes they go through in coming up with a title. The title of my first novel places me in a curious situation, where I both regret choosing the title, but where I am also delighted by the consequences.

Like the contents of the novel I wanted to strike out from some of the conventions of Science Fiction Military Adventure, and as an Indie it's one of the great freedoms available. I picked Ripples In An Emerald Sea because I felt it reflected my story, I could understand how it fitted, and it wasn't the usual form for a title. As a title it came to me as I was doing an early proof. However, only a few of my readers understood it, and when that happens it can only be the author's fault. Some readers even pointed out that it suggests primary elements of the book are Romance. I perhaps should have followed Tim's suggestion for one or two words and simply called it... [I'll save that one for later].

The following are the reasons why I might have published it under a different title:
a) It has a form and language that suggest a different genre of work
b) It's rather long to fit nicely on a cover
c) The connection with the story seem to be insufficiently strong for almost everyone but me.

Reasons why I went with the title:
a) It's distinctive for the genre and within search engines
b) It captures the essence of Ripples In An Emerald Sea's story (self delusion!?!... of course not!... well, perhaps... maybe... Moving on!)
c) [Appended] I've received a couple of great e-mails with theories about the title which have grown into a small e-mail discussion group about my book and it's puzzles. Some of the other mysteries, including Shiori, or the 'Green star' drew in some of the participants, but three very likeable people were met just from the title. Even if I could act on hindsight, I wouldn't give up their acquaintance.

As an Indie it's feasible to change the title, though I don't know what havoc that would reap on sales. I'm not, however, contemplating a title change, as I'm not quite alone in getting the title and it has become quite fun replying to reader theories. Nevertheless, it has been several more lessons on the learning curve of being an Indie.


message 37: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Lawston (andrewlawston) | 1789 comments I try and think of a witty title (Throwing Up With the Joneses), or a pun title (Pierrot le Who, Jake the Pig), and failing that I go with a boring title that's broadly descriptive. Or, obviously even better, all three: The Frag Prince.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments in my opinion, Indies come up with much better titles than those authors enslaved to trad publishers.
how many wonderful titles have we seen trashed after the book has been 'discovered'?

makes me wanna cry


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments oh and ripples on an emerald sea is absolute magic as a title


message 40: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments Actually, the full title of my novel is

WANTED: A Title for my Flick Carter Novel All Suggestions Welcome Please Reply Below

Which is great for a thread title, but not so hot for a book. And as it turned out, no one replied to the thread or suggested anything else, so I just truncated it.


message 41: by Philip (new)

Philip Whiteland | 3101 comments As I use old sayings of my mum and dad's more often than not, I'm usually pretty safe from accidental identical volumes (except for Jambalaya, of which there are quite a few)


message 42: by Adam (new)

Adam (adammannan) | 133 comments Patti (Beach Bunny) wrote: "oh and ripples on an emerald sea is absolute magic as a title"

Thank you, Patti. You're a gem!


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments i'm an emerald. :-)


message 44: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments Patti (Beach Bunny) wrote: "oh and ripples on an emerald sea is absolute magic as a title"

No it's not! :)

'Mutant turnips attack Bristol.' That's a title!


message 45: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21702 comments R.M.F wrote: "Patti (Beach Bunny) wrote: "oh and ripples on an emerald sea is absolute magic as a title"

No it's not! :)

'Mutant turnips attack Bristol.' That's a title!"


Yes but the news story only made page four of the Daily Mail


message 46: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments Jim wrote: "R.M.F wrote: "Patti (Beach Bunny) wrote: "oh and ripples on an emerald sea is absolute magic as a title"

No it's not! :)

'Mutant turnips attack Bristol.' That's a title!"

Yes but the news story ..."


News story? That's the title of my next horror novel. I predict it will sell well...


message 47: by Karen (new)

Karen Lowe | 2333 comments Patti (Beach Bunny) wrote: "in my opinion, Indies come up with much better titles than those authors enslaved to trad publishers.
how many wonderful titles have we seen trashed after the book has been 'discovered'?

makes me ..."


Yep, as with Mary Fitzgerald's retitled books. Whatever are the publishers thinking? She had the titles spot on.


message 48: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 4128 comments Never mind the titles - most book covers on crime novels these days seem to be utter brown stuff!

Yeah, crime novels need to look dark and edgy, but some of the black and white covers you see are cringe worthy.


message 49: by Andy (new)

Andy Elliott | 1524 comments Jim wrote: "Yes but the news story only made page four of the Daily Mail ..."

Half-inching titles from newspaper headlines never did Pink Floyd any harm.


message 50: by Jim (new)

Jim | 21702 comments Andy wrote: "Jim wrote: "Yes but the news story only made page four of the Daily Mail ..."

Half-inching titles from newspaper headlines never did Pink Floyd any harm."


I well remember the Times headline 'Ummagumma' :-))


« previous 1
back to top