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message 1: by R.A. (new)

R.A. White (rawhite) | 131 comments Hi, everybody.
I recently read a thread where someone mentioned that he (I think it was a he) had done a book signing at B. and N. and it had gone very well. I've been thinking about it for a week or so, and decided I want to look into it some more. Does anyone here have any experience with this? I can't remember where I read about it originally.
Any help would be appreciated.


message 2: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Rockefeller (laurelarockefeller) | 31 comments R.A. wrote: "Hi, everybody.
I recently read a thread where someone mentioned that he (I think it was a he) had done a book signing at B. and N. and it had gone very well. I've been thinking about it for a week ..."


I have not done a signing at anything so big, but I do know, at least when I asked about it with Books a Million, that getting a signing requires that the store carries your book in stock. This is extremely difficult to get for independent authors. At least with BAM, it involves you personally mailing out books to their warehouses, taking returns (at your cost), and so forth -- the sort of inventory and investment geared towards traditional publishing where they print x number of thousands of books -- then try to sell them.

At least with BAM, it is really incompatible with print on demand. So despite the local manager at BAM wanting to carry my books and have me doing a signing event, it was not possible.

So instead, I'm working through local clubs and organizations. I have a book signing event this Saturday as part of a multi family yard sale going off, a sort of neighborhood block party. Really looking forward to it. I will be wearing a blue linen kirtle that is not only what my ladies in my books wear, but also, because of the particular blue of this particular linen, uncannily similar to the gown wore by Merida in "Brave."


message 3: by R.A. (new)

R.A. White (rawhite) | 131 comments Laurel wrote: "R.A. wrote: "Hi, everybody.
I recently read a thread where someone mentioned that he (I think it was a he) had done a book signing at B. and N. and it had gone very well. I've been thinking about i..."


Thanks.
It seems like the person who was talking about it didn't have trouble with the instock issue-he just had to promise a certain number of sales-but that is something I was wondering about, along with everything else. I am working with my library and hope to do some community events, but was hoping for something larger scale. Not good at this.
Thanks again.


message 4: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Rockefeller (laurelarockefeller) | 31 comments R.A. wrote: "Laurel wrote: "R.A. wrote: "Hi, everybody.
I recently read a thread where someone mentioned that he (I think it was a he) had done a book signing at B. and N. and it had gone very well. I've been t..."


Everything I read about signings is that they generate do NOT result in that many sales at the event. Their real contribution is getting you physically seen and therefore offering some more name recognition -- and perhaps an invite or to to give a talk to a local group.

I am hoping for better than average response this weekend by dressing the part. One positive aspect of applying my 20+ years as a medieval re-enactor to my books is that my characters wear clothing that you readily might find at one of our re-enactments. So buying or sewing a costume is doable for such an event without going to insane amounts of trouble. :)


message 5: by R.A. (new)

R.A. White (rawhite) | 131 comments I know I always like seeing people really get into their roles. I'm not sure how that would work for me, though. I probably COULD dress like one of my characters, but I'm not sure it would be a positive thing, at least not at the library. Maybe at a community festival or something, where things are a bit lighter. then again, what do I know?


message 6: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Rockefeller (laurelarockefeller) | 31 comments R.A. wrote: "I know I always like seeing people really get into their roles. I'm not sure how that would work for me, though. I probably COULD dress like one of my characters, but I'm not sure it would be a pos..."

it depends on what your characters are wearing. :) Here again, going the medieval route for my story helps. After all, that was before lotion sunscreens when the way to avoid melanoma was ... hats, gloves, and fully covered bodies!


message 7: by R.A. (new)

R.A. White (rawhite) | 131 comments Well, my characters where plenty of clothes, it's just that they wear mostly woodsman uniforms, kind of like camo, or very plain woodsman clothes. I'm not the type to wear a suit, or anything, but I don't think I'm ready to wear something that looks like I've been playing out in the swamp. Maybe i just need to develop a little more self-confidence, first. Of course, when and if I do decide to make the change, we have plenty of swamps around here that I could use for authenticity's sake. Delaware is fairly flat, and wet.


message 8: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Rockefeller (laurelarockefeller) | 31 comments R.A. wrote: "Well, my characters where plenty of clothes, it's just that they wear mostly woodsman uniforms, kind of like camo, or very plain woodsman clothes. I'm not the type to wear a suit, or anything, but ..."

lol, and here I thought a woodsman wore a kirtle (for men's it's a renaissance shirt) under a leather doublet! :)


message 9: by R.A. (new)

R.A. White (rawhite) | 131 comments I think that is pretty standard for a lot of fantasy. 'Kergulen' is definitely fantasy, but the people in the country Kergulen wear more modern kinds of clothes. The women wear pants, for example. Dresses are fairly ungainly in the forest, and since the Kergulenites have toilettes, the women don't need to wear skirts.
On a personal note, I am SO glad squatting is largely a thing of the past!


message 10: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Rockefeller (laurelarockefeller) | 31 comments R.A. wrote: "I think that is pretty standard for a lot of fantasy. 'Kergulen' is definitely fantasy, but the people in the country Kergulen wear more modern kinds of clothes. The women wear pants, for example. ..."

Dresses are not ungainly in any environment, speaking as someone who wears ONLY skirts and dresses. My thighs and hips make trousers rather uncomfortable (I am just not proportioned to wear them). Skirts, however, have dozens of silohettes, allowing pretty much any body type to handle them well.

Last year when my baby cockatiel flew away (right over my head while I was moving), I had to search for her in a nearby forest. My skirts were not the issue -- the uneven ground and my sight loss were!

Just food for thought!


message 11: by Lana (new)

Lana Axe (lana_axe) | 45 comments I've thought about contacting my local B&N as well as some indie shops about doing a signing once my second novel is finished. However, I might chicken out. I definitely won't be appearing in costume.... ;)


message 12: by R.A. (new)

R.A. White (rawhite) | 131 comments I've been working out some local things and having fun getting it set up. I've since learned that signing on with Barnes and Nobel means an automatic minimum price increase, since they will take a chunck, and so I haven't gone any farther with that. But I'm on the agenda for three nearby libraries and an independant book shop, to start. Today I went to a festival and handed out a bunch of my cards. Who knows, maybe it will be the beginning of something big?
Oh, and I would start the signings BEFORE the second novel is finished. It can take a long time to get things lined up, and wouldn't it be great to have things in place for the debut? Or just have the first novel and then go back later with the second. Everyone who sees your first book is a potential buyer for the second, as well.
Anyway, that's where I am with it.
And no costumes.


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