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Writing > Literary Agents

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message 1: by Jodi (new)

Jodi Woody (jodiwoody) Hi all I am new here. I have selfpublished three books, two Christian Romance and an adult fairytale/allegory. I am wondering about using a literary agent. If you could answer a few questions for me that would be great.
Do you use an agent?
How did you find them?
What benefit have they provided (not promised)?
Thank you,
Jodi Woody


message 2: by Kingdom (new)

Kingdom (kingdomexpansion) | 69 comments Hi Jody.

You might Google those very questions, as there is a lot of information about that online ...

You might also contact Smitty at CBM Christian Book Marketing at kingdomexpansion1@gmail.com with regards to expanded author promotions and book marketing.


message 3: by Jodi (new)

Jodi Woody (jodiwoody) Kingdom wrote: "Hi Jody.

You might Google those very questions, as there is a lot of information about that online ...

You might also contact Smitty at CBM Christian Book Marketing at kingdomexpansion1@gmail.com..."


Thanks


message 4: by Lee (new)

Lee Harmon (DubiousDisciple) | 17 comments In my experience, it's harder to entice a good agent than it is a publisher. Agents are sort of the new editors, so they don't want to put all the work into you unless they smell a winner. But if you can, go for it!


message 5: by Carlene (new)

Carlene Havel (chch) | 29 comments I do not have an agent. My publisher is a small press focused primarily on ebooks. However, the longer works are available in trade paperback format also. I think the cutoff point is at/about 50,000 words. It's PrismBookGroup.com, where you'll find a tab for frequently asked questions and another for submisisons guidelines.
Here's a website where you can check out the reputation of publishers, agents, etc. http://pred-ed.com/pubwarn.htm They also list some of the red flags to be aware of.
If your goal is to be published, I think the small epublishers are your best chance. Big, famous, established print publishers often refuse to deal directly with authors - thus, you have to have an agent to get your foot in the door with those folks. The tradeoff is, if you do manage to make that connection you will probably have more exposure to potential readers through brick & mortar bookstores. I hope those stores are not a dying breed, but have seen lots of them go out of business in the past few years.


message 6: by Jodi (new)

Jodi Woody (jodiwoody) Lee wrote: "In my experience, it's harder to entice a good agent than it is a publisher. Agents are sort of the new editors, so they don't want to put all the work into you unless they smell a winner. But if y..."

Thanks for the reply


message 7: by Jodi (new)

Jodi Woody (jodiwoody) Carlene wrote: "I do not have an agent. My publisher is a small press focused primarily on ebooks. However, the longer works are available in trade paperback format also. I think the cutoff point is at/about 50..."

Thank you for the advice.


message 8: by Alex (new)

Alex Adena | 1 comments Jodi:

When I was a screenwriter, I did have an agent but she was most useful as a story editor. You can hire that person separately without paying a commission on every sale.

As a novelist, I don't have an agent and I think most writers don't need one early in their careers. You can build a following solely through ebooks these days. When an agent comes in handy when you're selling 50,000 books a year and someone wants to buy the audiobook or foreign language rights. Then an agent can be worth every penny if they negotiate a good contract for you. But until then, I wouldn't worry about it.

Alex


message 9: by Jodi (new)

Jodi Woody (jodiwoody) Alex wrote: "Jodi:

When I was a screenwriter, I did have an agent but she was most useful as a story editor. You can hire that person separately without paying a commission on every sale.

As a novelist, I don..."

Thanks for the reply.


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