Dystopia Land discussion

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message 1: by Jill (new)

Jill | 4 comments Has anyone read this, and is your reaction? Would it be considered dystopian?


message 2: by Bittman (new)

Bittman  (bittman) | 8 comments I wouldn't call it dystopian. Also, all the praise it receives is making it seem overrated. It's not as great as is talked about, but still worth a read at least once.


message 3: by Bron (new)

Bron | 5 comments I was initially enthralled by it. This quick wore off as it started meandering around the story line. I had to push to get through it at all in the hope it would be worth it in the end. It wasn't.
I will admit I was intrigued by the many and varied eclectic references within the book.
Some people may consider this book dystopian.


message 4: by Chris (new)

Chris Ward (chriswardfictionwriter) | 77 comments I like Murakami but find him frustrating, so I'm kind of put off by the length. I recently read Sputnik Sweetheart, and while I liked it I got kind of annoyed when it fell into the unexplained plot twist territory of Kafka on the Shore. I guess I'm just not suited to surrealist literature. I absolutely loved Norwegian Wood, though. I really wish he'd write more like it.


message 5: by Empress, Seeker of wonders (new)

Empress (the_empress) | 1215 comments Mod
I was wondering if I should read IQ84 and Kafka on the shore, but I really don't know what to expect from surrealistic literature. I'm not sure I ever read something surrealistic and that I would like it.


message 6: by Morgan (new)

Morgan (sputnik74) | 6 comments I LOVED the Wind Up Bird Chronicle and really liked Kafka. I have bought IQ84 but have been to scared to start - its a bit intimidating!


message 7: by Sue (new)

Sue Perry | 4 comments I also was intrigued at first but ultimately found it painful and annoying. More than once I reacted, "Really? *That* is where you decided to take this?"


message 8: by Bittman (new)

Bittman  (bittman) | 8 comments Morgan wrote: "I LOVED the Wind Up Bird Chronicle and really liked Kafka. I have bought IQ84 but have been to scared to start - its a bit intimidating!"

What makes it intimidating?


message 9: by Morgan (new)

Morgan (sputnik74) | 6 comments just the sheer size of it.


message 10: by Hákon (new)

Hákon Gunnarsson | 36 comments I really liked Sputnik Sweetheart. It's the only Murakami novel I've read so far, but it has got me interested in him.


message 11: by Bittman (new)

Bittman  (bittman) | 8 comments Morgan wrote: "just the sheer size of it."

Despite that it was actually a very quick read, I feel.


message 12: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I actually loved this book. I read it and then later listened to the audio. A friend and I were discussing it and laughing about the fact that we would never feel comfortable recommending it to anyone because as soon as you try to explain the plot is sounds stupid.

I think you read Murakami for his writing, not for the stories he is telling if that makes sense.


message 13: by Stuart (new)

Stuart Ridgway | 23 comments This was certainly an epic in terms of size but was slower than his other books. Dystopian? Not really. He has also begun repeating themes which is disappointing and whilst I realise he has a thing for cats and wells this book reworks some broader general themes.

He's really more of an alternative universe/reality kind a guy. Sputnik Sweetheart, The Wind Up Bird Chronicle and After Dark being my favourites.


message 14: by Empress, Seeker of wonders (new)

Empress (the_empress) | 1215 comments Mod
Stuart wrote: "Dystopian? Not really."

Thanks for that. It is difficult sometimes to know beforehand which book is actually dystopian.


message 15: by Arun (new)

Arun Iyer (aruniyer) | 9 comments I have read it and while book 1 generated a lot of excitement, but it died down with book 2 and book 3 was a disappointment. By the end, the only character that stood out was probably Ushikawa.

And although the book is hailed as a dystopian novel, I would hardly consider this as dystopian. Yes, there is violence in the novel, but they are singularities; exceptions rather than the norm. Yes, there is an organization intending to spread their faith throughout the world and exhibit control over everyone, but they are no more or less menacing than any political/religious organizations that we have today. We do live in a fairly dystopian world, so I guess the book qualifies as a dystopia in that sense. However, the book really doesn't explore the organization itself in the story, rather its impact on 2 specific individuals. We get glimpses of atrocities committed by the organization, but the book failed to show me how dangerous the organization really is. At the end of the day, the story is simply about 2 people fated to meet and they do so in a somewhat supernatural conditions by overcoming several trials both from outside and from within. In my opinion, this book while discussing a global event fails to convey the impact of the global event and ends up being a surrealistic romance story. Can anybody really call this as a dystopia?


message 16: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I don't consider this book dystopic at all for all the reasons you mentioned, but I still loved it.

I agree that books 2 and 3 were less "exciting" than book 1, but I really read Murakami for the way he writes, not what he writes about.


message 17: by Arun (new)

Arun Iyer (aruniyer) | 9 comments Kandice wrote: "I don't consider this book dystopic at all for all the reasons you mentioned, but I still loved it.

I agree that books 2 and 3 were less "exciting" than book 1, but I really read Murakami for the..."

Fair Enough.


message 18: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 7 comments I've read Sputnik Sweetheart and 1Q84. I think there was a lot of critical backlash to 1Q84 because of how much this book was hyped right from the start. I think the backlash made it sort of trendy to be overly critical and consequently also overrate retroactively some of his other novels. I thought it was marvelous, the writing itself is beautiful and Murakami brought all the seeming disparate plot strands together in a poignant and ironic ending.


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