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Policies & Practices > HMSO publications

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message 1: by Jozef (new)

Jozef Nakielski (jozef_nakielski) | 100 comments What's the policy on these publication. Do we put the publisher as HMSO?

I've also noticed that some use
Ministry of Transport And The Central Office of on formation

then others use
Driving Standards Agency
Dept.of Transport
Department of Transport

all are highways code or road signs orientated but can't be combined because the author is different.
Whilst I understand that not every copy of the Highway code is published HMSO or authored by a HMSO department the ones that are should be consistent, certainly the three above. Any thought ?


message 2: by rivka, Librarian Moderator (new)

rivka | 41062 comments Mod
Links to examples?


message 4: by rivka, Librarian Moderator (new)

rivka | 41062 comments Mod
Ah, this is a UK thing. Hopefully some of our UK librarians are familiar with this.


message 5: by Jozef (new)

Jozef Nakielski (jozef_nakielski) | 100 comments well dept.of transport is the same as department of transport regardless of whats on the book so it should be one or the other. Some have Driving Standards Agency on too, some also have Department of transport.

Basically Rivka its published by a Government department rather than an author. And is Controlled by Her Majesties Stationary Office like all our mapping is rather than a publisher.

Its very confusing.


message 6: by rivka, Librarian Moderator (new)

rivka | 41062 comments Mod
Jozef wrote: "its published by a Government department rather than an author."

That much I got. But in terms of what accepted nomenclature is, I have a hard enough time with ones from my country.


message 7: by Emy (new)

Emy (emypt) | 5017 comments Library wise, no one seems to agree. Not helped by it changing it's name again. Since the field isn't searchable in the same way as, say, authors, I'd put it as it shows on the cover/tp - ususally HMSO or H.M.S.O.

Author is not publisher on Off Pubs though. In a previous incarnation I was partially responsible for the damned things and it was always something of a stab in the dark to identify authors. With regards to the names of departments, I would be inclined to go with the LoC bit but without the "Great Britain" in front of it for here, if Rivka agrees.

e.g.
LC: Great Britain. Dept. of Transport
GR: Dept. of Transport

BUT downside is whether that would then attribute publications to Depts from other (English speaking) countries which have the same names?


message 8: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (librovert) | 2459 comments Emy wrote: "BUT downside is whether that would then attribute publications to Depts from other (English speaking) countries which have the same names?"

Since it agrees with the LoC and because of this reason, I think it needs to stay Great Britain.

I would format it as Great Britain Department of Transport, I think the period after Great Britain is weird.


message 9: by Lesley (new)

Lesley | 59 comments Vicky wrote: "Emy wrote: "BUT downside is whether that would then attribute publications to Depts from other (English speaking) countries which have the same names?"

Since it agrees with the LoC and because of ..."


That period after Great Britain is correct. The publication is 'authored' by laws enacted by Great Britain with the Department of Transport being the controlling body.

The same applies to the HMSO. No matter how it appears on the publication,or where for that matter, a library cataloguer would use the authorised heading of Great Britain. Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. The created authority record for this heading also would contain see references to prior forms of the heading used, abbreviations etc.

Using authorised (accepted form) is done in an endeavour to ensure all works created by a corporate/personal/group are linked to each other.


message 10: by Emy (new)

Emy (emypt) | 5017 comments Ella's Gran wrote: "The same applies to the HMSO. No matter how it appears on the publication,or where for that matter, a library cataloguer would use the authorised heading of Great Britain. Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. The created authority record for this heading also would contain see references to prior forms of the heading used, abbreviations etc."

HMSO: Depends whether it's publisher or author, as I said above. As author also depends on age since HMSO is now TSO, but struggling to think of an example where either is AUTHOR not publisher.

Vicky wrote: "I would format it as Great Britain Department of Transport, I think the period after Great Britain is weird. "

Are many non-specialist librarians likely to shelve/fix OffPubs? If yes, then using a GR style no . seems logical, but if not I'd say sticking to the COUNTRY. DEPT formation would be less jarring to them. Whichever needs a Lib Note though so we don't get fix merry-go-rounds :)


message 11: by Jozef (last edited Jun 06, 2013 06:56AM) (new)

Jozef Nakielski (jozef_nakielski) | 100 comments I have no idea what you are on about. What is LoC, LC, GR.
What is a GR style no.

The publisher for most of these is HMSO.
The authors seem to vary But department of transport and dept of transport should be either one or the other. and as I've never seen it written as dept. in the books I'm not sure as to why it would be that way.

unless of course when its not published by HMSO but by a private publisher under licence. such as Select All.


message 12: by Emy (new)

Emy (emypt) | 5017 comments GR = GoodReads!

LC / LoC = Library of Congress - the source for most authoritative descriptions used by English speaking libraries internationally.

The issue here Jozef, as I see it, is whether you are speaking about a Publisher or an Author.

A publisher isn't a fully indexed field and therefore can be entered as seen.
An Author links to a GR Author page and therefore needs to be uniform.


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