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Literary Fiction > Contemporary Urban Fiction

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message 1: by Selena (new)

Selena Haskins (booksbyselena) Welcome to Contemporary Urban Fiction!

I am Selena Haskins, and I write contemporary urban fiction. I would to discuss contemporary urban authors new and established, especially indies in this genre. If you enjoy the works of authors such as Connie Briscoe, Margaret Johnson-Hodge, Carl Weber, Omar Tyree, and J. California, than this is the group for you! We can exchange ideas, thoughts, and talk about various subjects within our urban communities. You are welcomed to tell us about your favorite authors who write urban fiction and also recommend their books. Selena Haskins


message 2: by Selena (new)

Selena Haskins (booksbyselena) Contemporary Urban Fiction is not the "street literature" of today's Urban Fiction which is very explicit, violent, extremely vulgar and sexual, profanity and definitely has no limits. Whereas Contemporary Urban fiction is a watered down version so-to-speak of urban life. It also focuses more on a better outcome and a rising above triumph. It also focuses on the middle-class African Americans or the carerr-driven African-Americans. This genre is fighting to stay alive right now because so many young African-Americans are attracted to the gritty and the dirtier the better. It doesn't matter if there is a real plot as long as all the vulgarities are there.

I have been talking with some of my favorite authors via email and Facebook and we were just saying this is a sad case for African -American writers because we have so much more to say and so many real stories to tell. Gone are the 90s when Terry Mcmillan set the tone for contemporary urban fiction, but we are trying to keep that genre alive. It is up to new writers like me, they said, to keep telling inspirational stories of triumph and not fall into the status quo.

Sorry this is so long, but this is an issue I'm very passionate and concerned about.

I think your book crosses into two separate genres-mystery and suspense.


message 3: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Dunlap I was just trying to define my genre earlier (I write family sagas) but most categories don't allow for that. I spoke with a fellow author and determined I was both contemporary and urban, but not to the extent of street lit. I steer clear of that area. So I love this coupled definition you've made, Selena. It's like the difference between watching a Tyler Perry movie which still gives values and supports AA that are in the middle class etc as you've put.


message 4: by Selena (new)

Selena Haskins (booksbyselena) Hi Nicole,

Yes we are similar. I tend to write family sagas too, but also romance and drama. I like to compare my stories to Connie Briscoe. She is listed under Contemporary Fiction. The reason I added "urban" into the mix was that Contemporary Fiction is still broad, and most of the time if you do a search it will bring up contemporary authors from the 19th century like Jane Austen.


message 5: by Selena (new)

Selena Haskins (booksbyselena) I just put it under Contemporary Fiction like the authors I mentioned did, and sometimes Literary Fiction.


message 6: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Dunlap Oftentimes when I Google for research and want to collaborate with others some of them are more prone to the hardcore street fiction.So, how do you find book clubs and reviewers that enjoy contemporary urban fiction?


message 7: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Dunlap Hi I haven't looked into meet up for book clubs (I found my critique group there over a year ago) good idea. I usually google book clubs with African American Fiction or Urban Fiction. Oftentimes Urban ends up urban fantasy, which is all wrong. But thanks for the idea.
Dianne wrote: "Nicole, I would be curious as to how you do specific a certain audience market in book clubs. I pulled up "MeetUp," actually spoke to a couple of their groups and they have some specific groups, su..."


message 8: by Christopher, Founder (new)

Christopher Shields (wealdfaejournals) | 171 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "Hi I haven't looked into meet up for book clubs (I found my critique group there over a year ago) good idea. I usually google book clubs with African American Fiction or Urban Fiction. Oftentimes Urban ends up urban fantasy, which is all wrong."

All wrong, Nicole? I don't follow. Can you expound? Are you saying that Fantasy set in a city environment should not be classified as Urban Fantasy?


message 9: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Dunlap I'm not implying that at all. When I indicate urban fiction which is a sub African American genre sometimes Urban fantasy comes up. I ready some fantasy by the way, but the Internet hasn't fully gotten its separation of these two genres down. (Or something like that...I really have no answer)


message 10: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Dunlap My last comment is to Christopher.

I think Urban Fantasy is called as such because of the fantasy of different make believe characters and that is us set in a urban/ city location. I don't think the name is to pretty. Sometimes the book covers are with models who probably wouldn't be in that situation. But this is all open to debate.


message 11: by Christopher, Founder (last edited Jul 23, 2013 11:19AM) (new)

Christopher Shields (wealdfaejournals) | 171 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "My last comment is to Christopher.

I think Urban Fantasy is called as such because of the fantasy of different make believe characters and that is us set in a urban/ city location. I don't think ..."


To clarify, Nicole, the characters in Urban Fantasy are not created from any model of urban dwellers, but typically are oriented toward either Young Adult fantasy models or Paranormal Romance fantasy models. They aren't typically drawn from realistic urban social makeup, but are fantasy, usually erotic, characters dropped into urban settings, not urban culture per se. That's the typical makeup of an Urban Fantasy. There is really no crossover between what is considered the substance of Urban Fantasy and the substance of Urban Fiction. Two distinctly different variations on the urban setting. One taking the setting only, and one capturing the setting and culture to develop the scene and characters.


message 12: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Dunlap Thanks for the advice Selena. I list it as Drama> USA on kindle for one category. If you have kdp.amazon.com you should be able to switch it around anytime and it takes affect in a few days. I've done that with all my books to see which gives best exposure.

By the way Selena, I just noticed you as a member of the Summer Book Bash... Wow we've been going back and for with these urban fiction definitions this long :)


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