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Previous BotM--DISCUSSIONS > THE NIGHT CIRCUS: Finished -- BEWARE!! SPOILERS LIKELY!!

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message 1: by Nick (new)

Nick (doily) | 977 comments Please tell us your impressions of The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern.

BEWARE!! SPOILERS LIKELY!!


message 2: by Helen (last edited Jun 01, 2013 02:03PM) (new)

Helen I read this about a year ago. The imagery is wonderful. I covet the clock.


message 3: by Shel, Moderator (new)

Shel (shel99) | 2388 comments Mod
I read it back in February and loved it. My review is here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Looking forward to hearing what everyone else has to say!


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

The novel's nonlinear and often confusing timeline has been a point of contention for many critics. Some claim that the novel is unnecessarily complicated, and that a traditional structure would have served the story just as well, if not better. Others argue that the fragmented structure is critical to Morgenstern's representation of history and time as cyclic. There is no sense of time within dreams, and therefore this must be reflected in the circus' constructed dream world. The theme must also, then, be highlighting within the novel's structure, referencing the way the past, present, and future are intertwined.


message 5: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 20 comments I loved this book. It was one of the most original stories that I have ever read. It was almost a visible feast for the eyes.


message 6: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne | 98 comments I agree that it was original. I would LOVE to visit the circus! What was your favorite tent? I loved the wishing tree and the cloud maze.


message 7: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 20 comments Suzanne wrote: "I agree that it was original. I would LOVE to visit the circus! What was your favorite tent? I loved the wishing tree and the cloud maze."

Yes me too. I loved the black and white theme and the clock.


message 8: by Allen (new)

Allen (allenblair) | 2 comments NYKen wrote: "The novel's nonlinear and often confusing timeline has been a point of contention for many critics. Some claim that the novel is unnecessarily complicated, and that a traditional structure would ha..."

For me, I think the nonlinear method works well to keep reader interested, tease me so to speak. Sometimes when a chapter occurred in the future, I couldn't wait to get back in time - in the next chapter or two - to discover what led to those events or changed the characters.

That's why I like the dream analogy. In some ways, I experienced the entire read that way because of its structure. Like remembering parts of a dream when you wake, then later on in the day seeing something that sparks yet another memory from that same dream - my mind was constantly piecing together the puzzle, and I found myself understanding it more and more, even after I put the book down.

Also, early impressions: I enjoyed the more realistic approach to magic (if I can say it that way) in that it's something that spans a significant amount of time, and has deep-rooted consequences regardless of when you use it or intend for an action to happen. Seems more "magical." Circuses? Who doesn't love the "magic" of one. Ideal playground for Morgenstern's ideas in this novel. And, while not a total fan of romances, I liked the way the romantic element evolved - the building of dreams for each other. Even the themes seem cyclical in this book.

My favorite element is the nature versus nurture debate that it seems to evoke through the main characters. I mean, can one be taught magic or is it innate? Can one be taught love, hate, compassion, romance, patience, etc., or is it innate - and if it's innate, what happens if we have no talent for love, or hate? All questions I found myself pondering. Anybody else? Anyone find any answers?


message 9: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 20 comments Allen wrote: "NYKen wrote: "The novel's nonlinear and often confusing timeline has been a point of contention for many critics. Some claim that the novel is unnecessarily complicated, and that a traditional stru..."

Allen lovely summation. Yes I was also captivated by similar questions but then the nature/nurture thing is something I have often pondered.


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