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Wool Omnibus (Silo, #1)
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2013 Reads > Wool: Lukas (Full Spoilers)

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Andrew Stadler | 7 comments What do you think you would of done if you were Lucas? You learn what is really going on, but are tasked with the burdon of keeping the Silo safe. If you go against convention then you risk the Silo and it could end up like Silo 17. While I dont like a lost of the decisions that IT makes I think it's hard to just say you are going to risk everyone's life because you don't like the methods.

Personally I think I would stick with the book. Am I a bad person for putting the needs of the group higher?


Julia | 180 comments The issue I had was that I didn't see that what IT was doing was actually keeping anyone safe. A lot of actions that were taken seemed more likely to antagonize the other sections. Understandable with Brenard's rather odvous classism, not so odvous with Lucas.


Ulmer Ian (eean) | 341 comments There's no reason to think the IT manager in Silo 17 didn't go by the book.

I mean the book says "Failed cleaning? Prepare for war." THANKS. The whole system is very fragile.


Royce Pipkins | 2 comments The notion seems to be that the book is a scientifically researched playbook. So given that I can understand Andrew's leanings. However, the output of the playbook makes it a little hard to suspend disbelief. It's hard to imagine research arriving at that social structure as the optimal structure for maintaining the people in the silo.

Just off-hand, throwing 'idea people' out the air lock door doesn't seem much in keeping with any sort of notion of eugenics. I guess there is some drug in the next series that helps paper over some of these problems, but I haven't read those.

Still, I enjoyed the book.


Ruth (tilltab) Ashworth | 1702 comments Personally, I would agree to go by the book, but plan on being much nicer than Bernard, plan on making things better whist seeming to comply. The trouble with that is, I have a suspicion Bernard may have begun his role in the same way.


Julian Arce | 71 comments Uhmm, the psychology of people on close quarters (even if they are as big as the silo) can be complicated. It is not close to my area of work, but I do remember reading something about the biospheres and other type of experiments... and things can get ugly quick.

I think it makes sense to keep the silos isolated, since information and ideas, if they jumped from silo to silo, could bring down the species.

But the whole cleaning thing seemed stupid... in fact, the whole denial of the outside seemed weird. If I had to design such a place, I would try to give it some sense of purpouse; having people know that all their efforts would eventually mean the preservation of the specie... even if only their grandkids grandkids would get there... otherwise, you have a time bomb ticking... which is essentially what happened.

Interesting book


Buzz Park (buzzpark) | 238 comments I grudgingly found some of Bernard's explanations compelling. There definitely was some logic and reasoning behind keeping the silo's isolated and the truth hidden.

However, the power of such knowledge and the control that the IT head had was obviously a very corrupting influence as indicated by Bernard's behavior. What's the saying, "ultimate power corrupts ultimately"? While some of the reasoning behind the silo's design, those reasons did not justify Bernard's murderous behavior.

Also, I believe one of the "morals" of the book may be that the ultimate result of the silo's social and structural design (forced isolation and enforced ignorance) is the descent of the society into casts and the moral corruption of those wielding the power. Wouldn't most of us like to believe that knowing the truth will ultimately have the best results?


Shaina (shainaeg) | 165 comments Has anyone figured out why IT was trying to get more power by putting one of their own in the Sheriff position? It seems like they're already running the place secretly, did they really want the position, or did they now want Juliette in it? I know they do a bunch of surreptitious killings, but why kill the Mayor? These events set off most of the conflict in the book, I just don't understand why they happened in the first place.


Neil | 165 comments Shaina wrote: "Has anyone figured out why IT was trying to get more power by putting one of their own in the Sheriff position? It seems like they're already running the place secretly, did they really want the p..."

Well there were 3 positions of power in the Silo; the head of IT, the mayor and the sheriff. If you are trying to deceive all of the people in the silo having control of all these positions is going to make that easier. It is always going to be easier to cover up murdering people if the person in charge of investigating them is part of the conspiracy.

With Bernard taking over as Mayor with Lukas backing him up in IT and their guy as sheriff they would be able to get away with a lot more.


Andrew Stadler | 7 comments Something else that intrigued me was how long they have been in the silos. I don't remember for sure but I think they said a couple hundred years! America has only been around 237 years and yet they have kept people ignorant for a long long time. Even if we hate what they are doing only losing a handful of Silos in that amount of time is quite the feat.


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Anna | 19 comments Shaina wrote: "Has anyone figured out why IT was trying to get more power by putting one of their own in the Sheriff position? It seems like they're already running the place secretly, did they really want the position, or did they now want Juliette in it? I know they do a bunch of surreptitious killings, but why kill the Mayor? These events set off most of the conflict in the book, I just don't understand why they happened in the first place. "

I thought they were trying to kill the deputy: it was his water she drank. That was what the mayor thought anyway. I thought they were trying to get rid of him, because he was the one suggesting sheriffs to the mayor, so he was not exactly in power but had a lot of influence. Why they wanted to kill him was not clear to me, this is just my own speculation.


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Amy | 6 comments Anna wrote: "I thought they were trying to kill the deputy: it was his water she drank"

If you read the part when they are in Bernards office on their way down to Juliette:

"She signaled to Marnes, who turned so she could grab his canteen from his pack. Then she turned so he could grab hers as well. Bernard waved to one of his workerd to come fetch them and fill them up, but the entire time he kept his eyes on this curious and intimate exchange"

Bernard knew all to well which bottle she would be drinking from.


Sandi (sandikal) | 1212 comments Great observation, Amy! One of the things I really liked about this book was the way Howey could say so much in so few words. Blink and you miss an important detail.


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Neil | 165 comments Sandi wrote: "Great observation, Amy! One of the things I really liked about this book was the way Howey could say so much in so few words. Blink and you miss an important detail."

I missed that too until it was pointed out in a thread on here. I thought he was keeping an eye on the exchange as he was going to be a stereotypical lonely IT nerd that wasn't familiar with normal acts of friendship like that. I didn't think it was because he was an sneaky murdering bastard.


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Anna | 19 comments Amy wrote: "Bernard knew all to well which bottle she would be drinking from."

Thanks for pointing this out! It does make more sense now... I totally missed that. Like Neil, at the time I just thought he was observing as an outsider seeing that they have a relationship. Not that he was trying to murder her...


Emmanuel Parfond (frenchdude) | 45 comments Amy wrote: "Anna wrote: "I thought they were trying to kill the deputy: it was his water she drank"

If you read the part when they are in Bernards office on their way down to Juliette:

"She signaled to Marn..."


Oooooh I hadn't noticed that !


Josh Ryther | 5 comments Royce wrote: "The notion seems to be that the book is a scientifically researched playbook. So given that I can understand Andrew's leanings. However, the output of the playbook makes it a little hard to suspend..."

Im in the process of reading the next book, please tag spoilers at the beginning of comments where you give stuff away.


message 18: by Ruth (tilltab) Ashworth (last edited May 28, 2013 04:18AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ruth (tilltab) Ashworth | 1702 comments I don't think there was anything in his comment that wasn't in the wool omnibus, Josh.

Edit, unless you mean the drugs comment, but he was merely speculating.


Josh Ryther | 5 comments Ruth wrote: "I don't think there was anything in his comment that wasn't in the wool omnibus, Josh.

Edit, unless you mean the drugs comment, but he was merely speculating."


Well hearing from a friend isnt really speculating. The only reason I said it was I was at the part (in shift) where they take the pill but it hadn't explained it yet. Kind of ruined it for me.


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Neil | 165 comments Josh Ryther wrote: "Well hearing from a friend isnt really speculating. The only reason I said it was I was at the part (in shift) where .... Kind of ruined it for me. "

I can't see that Royce said that they had heard anything from a friend. They said "I guess..." which sounds like speculation to me. Where you were confirming outright something that happens in Shift that would have been a good place for those spoiler tags you were talking about.


Josh Ryther | 5 comments Neil wrote: "Josh Ryther wrote: "Well hearing from a friend isnt really speculating. The only reason I said it was I was at the part (in shift) where .... Kind of ruined it for me. "

I can't see that Royce sai..."

Lol Well Im not trying to come off as a jerk, just disappointed that part got spoiled for me. And the way he is saying it just sounds like he heard it from somewhere(I was wrong on it being a friend. Didnt reread the comment before I posted the last one), which isnt really speculation but relaying information. Anyways, I dont want to ruin this thread anymore so lets just stop it here.


Ruth (tilltab) Ashworth | 1702 comments Josh, you just gave away a massive, obvious spoiler! Dude, and you did it in reply to me! >.< Meanie! :P


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Rik | 777 comments Here is what I'll say about Lukas. If you go on to read Shift you'll understand the motivations of the IT folk a lot more. A non spoilerish summary of Shift is that its several different stories featuring different characters, some of which are IT, that eventually loosely connect telling the history of the Silos and how they came to be.


Rodrigo Castañeda (drniebla) | 4 comments Andrew wrote: "What do you think you would of done if you were Lucas?
I don't think you are a bad person for sticking with IT, actually the whole idea of IT was to protect the human race, the down part of that is that it got corrupted, they pass from protecting the silo to destroying anyone that thinks diffent, and the question there is: will IT will be willing to kill the hole mechanical level just because they wanted answers, I mean, mechanics don't grow in trees and it seems that they play a very important part in the silo live.
Now, reagarding Lukas, I don't know, maybe what really make me mad is that he choose neither side, he was just there, waiting, hearing people getting killed, know his friend, and sweetheart, was sended to death, knowing that Bernard was a murderer, and he did nothing, nothing. In the end Peter showed more backbone than Lukas.
Salutations :-)



Jonathon Dez-la-lour (jd2607) | 173 comments The power structure within Silo 18 is very similar to a lot of the dictatorships throughout the 20th and 21st centuries - Stalinist Russia, Maoist China, Fasist Italy and Nazi Germany. Control of everything: the police, information, money, food, medicine etc. all lying in the hands of a select few with little to no oversight. It's ended badly every single time that situation has arisen throughout history and it's the height of hubris to think that because they have the Order that they'll do any better.

I can't help but feel as though under Bernard and his predecessor's regimes, the subsection of humanity left within Silo 18 has lost too much - they know nothing of their history or culture - and have no purpose other than merely surviving.

I'd like to think that with Lukas and Juliette in charge, they'll find a better way to unify and focus the population of their Silo, perhaps by giving them a common goal as opposed to keeping them under control through breeding segregation and animosity.

I also think that perhaps knowing that there are other people out there, and what's happened and what's been lost and taken from them over the years might help create a better functioning society in the long run. To quote George Santayana "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" - if Lukas does the same as Bernard it may keep the residents of Silo 18 alive but what happens when the outside world is habitable again? Will they be too afraid to go out? Or will they go out, see people from the other Silos and start warring with them and end up killing each other to the point where the human race can't maintain a stable population? IT's past policies may be a short-term fix, but in the long run it'll probably do more harm than good.


William | 4 comments Shaina wrote: "Has anyone figured out why IT was trying to get more power by putting one of their own in the Sheriff position? It seems like they're already running the place secretly, did they really want the p..."
I think Bernard was motivated by ensuring that Juliette didn't get a close look at a cleaning suit he just overplayed his hand with the Mayor.


Scott | 312 comments While I think "following the book" might be good utilitarianism, there is old adage that "Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely." I agree with a number of people that various IT chiefs may start out idealistically thinking they won't be so despotic, but eventually they become drunk with the power of being almost god-like authority wise.


Julian Arce | 71 comments Uhmm, some had made the point that the silo structure of power resembles that of a dictatorship... and most mean it in a negative way. But, for a small group of humans, on survival mode, would a democracy be the better option? Or would it be better to delegate all power on "those who know best"?

The structure of the silo seems to make a point that in order to survive, is necessary for IT to have the power and knowledge it has, but also to work as shadow power while keeping the ilussion of choice and democracy.

I think that if Lukas would had more time on IT, or if Juliette hadn't been part of the equation, he might have come to believe the importance and pre-eminence of IT


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